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John Statham

circa 1385 - 1453

Father Thomas Stathum
Mother Elizabeth Lumley
Wife Cecily Cornwall
Children John, Thomas, Henry, Nicholas, Goditha


John was probably born in the 1380s (1) in Morley, the son of Thomas and Elizabeth (4)(5). His family were involved in a long running dispute with John of Gaunt, the Duke of Lancaster, and his retainers (2). The earliest mention found of John shows that this dispute would have played a big part in his upbringing, as he was said to have been chased back from Derby to Morley by his family's enemies in 1390/91 (3), when he was still a child, and may even have been as young as 5.

He had an illegitimate son John (17)(19)(22) (who went by the nickname of Jenkyn), with Cecily Cornwall, who he then went on to marry (6). After their marriage, they had three more sons, Thomas (6)(22)(20), Henry (6)(19)(22) and Nicholas (6)(22), and at least one daughter Goditha (7).

His father died in 1416 , and in 1424, John was involved in a dispute over land which he had inherited from him (5).

In 1426, John bought some property in Caldelowe (Callow) (8), to add to that which he already held there. In 1431, he quitclaimed some land he held in Aston on Trent (9). A more complete picture of his holdings can be seen from an inquest of knight's fees taken in 1431/32, in which he was shown to hold the manor of Morley, half the manor of Callow, and other lands in Aston and Wilne (10).

In 1434 he was appointed as one of the collectors of tax for Derbyshire (11). In the same year he also appeared in a list of Deryshire men entrusted with keeping the peace (12).

The Stathum family was closely connected with the Foljambes, John's daughter Goditha having married Roger Foljambe, and in 1435, John was one of three men appointed to arbitrate on behalf of Thomas Foljambe (13), in a settlement of his dispute with Sir Henry Pierpoint (14).

John was also one of the principal supporters of Ralph, Lord Cromwell, whose influence probably lead to John's appointment as sheriff a number of times in the 1430s and 1440s (15). Cromwell was probably also behind (14) John, along with his eldest son, being granted the keeping of Horston Castle in 1439 (17). Its unclear how long they held Horston for. It was still in their possession in 1451, but they may not have held it continuously throughout the interim. (18).

In 1443 John appears to have paid 100 to Thomas Okeover for the manor of Caldelowwe (Callow) (21), but this is a little confusing, and needs more research (23).

His wife Cecily died in April 1444 (32). Later the following year John appears to have succesfully defended a claim against his ownership of some land in Alsop (24).

In 1453, realising he was nearing his end, John agreed to pay 7 marks to Breadsall Priory, towards the cost of repairs to the roof and windows, in return for daily prayers for his soul, along with the souls of his wife, parents and grandmother (30). This was presumably around the same time that he arranged for similar prayers to be said at Morley church (31). He died about a week later on 6th November 1453 (32).


Brief details of his children:



Sources:

  1. His parents are believed to have been married in the early-mid 1380s (2), whilst John was a child by 1390/91 (3), so he must have been born soon after his parents' marriage.
  2. See his father's page
  3. "Central England and the Revolt of the Earls, January 1400" by David Crooks, Historical Research, Vol 64, Issue 155, Feb 1987, pp 403-410. This work discusses the role of the Stathum family in the Revolt of the Earls in 1400. It shows how the family had become allied to the Earl of Huntingdon, and that they must have had advance knowledge of a plot to assassinate the king, and were preparing to raise forces to support the rebel Earls. This is a very well referenced scholarly work, by a highly respected historian and archivist at the PRO/TNA. The references I have checked (probably about 40% of them), are all accurate, so I am happy to accept those I haven't as reliable, especially as I am not relying on them for genealogical proof, but rather just for detail of the Statham family's activities. It can be found online here
  4. In the book "The Descent of the Family of Statham", by Rev S P H Statham, the following appears. I have not been able to confirm this with the source yet : "In 1434 an assize was held in Bedford to discover whether John de Buckingham, bishop of Lincoln (1362-98) had unjustly disseized Robert, son of John Avenel, of the manor of Holewell in Shitlington, Shefford and Henlowe. Elizabeth, wife of Robert Lumley, and secondly of Thomas de Stathum, was a relative of and heir to the bishop and therefore John her son was heir. Robert Avenel married the daughter of Robert Belknappe and Julianna, his wife (Curia Regis Rolls, Trinity, 12 Henry VI, m93)"
  5. In the book "The Descent of the Family of Statham", by Rev S P H Statham, the following statement is made. I have not yet been able to confirm the sources for this. "In 1424 reference is made to a suit between Thomas de Stathum and John Hernyll for 2 acres in Callow. It is therin stated that Thomas died on the Monday next before the feastof S. M..... in the year 4 Henry V (1415-16) [Curia Regis Rolls, 2 Henry VI, Derby]. The defence made by John, son and heir of Thomas , was that Henry, son and heir of John Hernyll released and quitted all his rights and lands etc to Thomas de Stathum by a deed dated the Feast of S. Laurence 1396.".
  6. A Statham pedigree drawn up in 1544, and presented in evidence to the Court of Requests (Ref REQ 2/26/48 no 5 @ The National Archives), has been transcribed, and commented on, on the National Archives website, as part of a guide to using the archives. See www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/familyhistory/guide/popup/req_2_26.htm
    The transcript given by TNA reads:
    Herafter followeth the pedigre of John Statham son of Willm Statham late of London Mcer deceased made the 24th day of October Anno dno 1544 and in the 36th yere of the reign of our soveraign Lorde Kyng Henry the eight made by the instructions of Henry Sachaverell of Morley in the Countie of Darby knyght That is to wytt there was one John Statham greate grandfather unto the said Henry Sacheverell by his mother syde the whiche John the greate grandfather begatt a sonne in Basse and was borne in Basse of one Sessly the Barne of Burffordes doughter and named the said Childe John after his owne name whiche John was after comenly called Jenkyn and in shorte tyme after the said childe was borne the said John the greate graundfather toke to wyffe the same Sessly and had Issue by her in wedlock 3 sonnes Thomas Henry and Nycholas As hereunder dothe appere and afterwardes the said John the greate graundfather gave unto the said John als Jenkyn his basse sonne certeyn landes and tentes to hym and to his heires Males for evermore by a dede of intaile whiche John the Basse sonne maryed and had issue in wed lock as herafter dothe appere.
    A representation of the pedigree given is here
    The explanatory summary reads:
    A Tudor pedigree, of the Statham family, drawn up by Thomas Merydale, of London, in 1544. He was the servant of Richard Jervys, the stepfather of the plaintiff, John Statham. His sworn deposition recalled his master personally going up to Derbyshire to collect rents on John's lands in Snelston, Alsop and Roston whilst he was abroad. The defendant (and one of the tenants), Sir Henry Sacheverell, had visited Jervys in London whilst John Statham was still overseas, and claimed he would be the next heir should John die without male issue. The pedigree was drafted on Sacheverell's instructions to demonstrate his assertion. The title deeds for the lands had come into the defendant's possession, and without these Statham could not seek a remedy at common law. The case started off in the Court of Requests, but by 1561 it had been transferred to the Court of Chancery, where a final decree was issued in Statham's favour. Sacheverell's successor as defendant had failed to turn up at the court as ordered or to furnish any documentary proof of entitlement to the land. Apparently the lands were to descend in tail male (for example, through the male line in their entirety) under a deed of 1453. The grantor, John Statham (at the top of the family tree), was to have them for life, after which his son Nicholas and his male heirs were to hold them; if his male line died out, another of John's sons, Thomas, and his male heirs were to enjoy them, failing which they were to pass to another son Henry and his male heirs. John made provision for his illegitimate son John alias Jenkyn Statham and his male heirs to inherit should the male line become extinct for all three sons. Henry Sacheverell was descended from the original grantor in the female line whereas the plaintiff (at the bottom right-hand corner of the pedigree) was the great grandson of Jenkyn Statham.
  7. "Collectanea Topographica Et Genealogica", Volume 1, 1834, includes "Notices of the family of Foljambe ... chiefly from the private charters of the family; by Nathaniel Johnston, MD, 1701", which is said to be "from a transcript among Mr Gough's MSS in the Bodlean library". Included, as No 74, on page 111 is :
    ... Roger and his brother Thomas died this year [28 Hen VI - 1449/50] without male issue, for I find the same year that John Sacheverill Esq, Robert Tickhill Esq, John Francis and William Norton, give to Godith Statham, daughter of John Statham, a mess. in Tideswell and other lands, which they held of the feoffment of Roger Foljambe, son and heir of Sir Edward Foljambe, which was intailed to the said Roger and his heirs male, and for want of such issue to Thomas Foljambe of Walton. And if the said Thomas Foljambe of Walton die without issue, then to the heirs of the aforesaid Roger Foljambe."
    On page 345 it states :
    The 26th Hen VI [1447/78]. Thomas Foljambe of Walton Esq, and Thomas his son. Whereas Godith Statham, daughter of John Statham Esq, holds for term of life three messuages and lands in Tideswell and Lytton, the remainder, after the death of Roger Foljambe , to the said Thomas and his heirs, he confirms the possession of Godith for life."
  8. "Derbyshire Feet of Fines 1323-1546", 1985, number 1070, reads :
    "Westminster. Michaelmas three weeks 1426. P[laintiff]: John Stathum of Morley. D[eforciant]: William Wygley of Werkesworth and Agnes his wife. Concerning 1 messuage, 2 tofts and 3 bovates of land in Caldelowe. John had these of teh gift of William and Agnes who remised and quitclaimed of, and warranted for, themselves and the heirs of Agnes to John and his heirs. John gave 100 marks of silver"
  9. A document held at Derbyshire Record Office (ref: D 779B/T 91) has the following catalogue entry:
    Quitclaim from John Stathu' [Stathum] of Morley to John Tykhull, son and heir of Thomas Tykhull, of all his right and claim to all those lands and tenements, which recently were of John ?Lanerok in the township (Latin 'villa') and territory of Aston sup[er] Trent. Witnesses, John ? Curson, John Bathe, Thomas Bradshagh and others. Dated at Aston sup[er] Trent, Thursday after Annunciation [29 March] 9 Henry VI. Seal on tag.
  10. The Feudal History of the County of Derby, by John Pym Yeatman, Volume 1, section 2, pages 506, 508 and 510 lists entries from an inquest of knight's fee taken in 10 Henry VI [1431/32]. This shows that "John Stathum of Morley Esq" held 6s 8d in Wilne, the manor of Morley for 26, 40s in Aston, half the manor of Callow for 10. The book "The Descent of the Family of Statham", by Rev S P H Statham, also refers to this inquest, but claims that it describes him as armiger. This seems to be another example of this book inflating the status of members of the Statham family, so unless other evidence supports this, I am trusting Yeatman's unbiased transcipt.
  11. "Calendar of the Fine Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office" Vol XVI, 1937, page 189-192, quotes from 1st February 1434 :
    "Commision to [various men of Worcestershire] to levy and collect from all cities, boroughs and towns, and from all secular lords of towns and other lay persons having goods and possessions, and from others both great and small, in the county of Worcester, and also from ecclesiastical persons in respect of goods forthcoming from lands acquired by them since 20 Edward I, the fiftenth and tenth which the commonalities of the realm, with the assent of the lords spiritual and temporal, in the last Parliament, granted to the king, for the defense of the realm ..."
    "Commission in like terms to the following, to levy and collect such fifteenth and tenth in the counties, cities and boroughs named..."
    [Derbyshire] "John Stathom of Morley, John Dethike of Newehall, John Chester of Derby, William Orme of Derby, John Barker of Dore, John Fitzharbert of Somersale, William Bonyngton of Berewardcote, Richard Barley of Melburne, William Hardwycke of Hardwycke, Thomas Jankynson of Thurliston, John Rafeson of Repyngton, Gilbert Heys of Spondon, Roger Knyght of Breydsale; in the county of Derby" "
  12. "Calendar of the Patent Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office, Henry VI, Vol VI", 1910, pages 370-412, lists, by county, the men "who should take the oath not to maintain peace breakers referred to in [a recent Act of Parliament]" dated May 1st 1434. Those listed under the county of Derbyshire include John Stathum.
  13. "Calendar of the Close Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office, Henry VI, Vol II", 1933, page 365 contains the following entries :
    "July 13 [1435] Hemry Perponde knight to Thomas Foljambe esquire. Recognisance for 1,000li, to be levied etc in Notynghamshire.
    Condition that the said Henry, his servants and tenants, and Margery Bradshawe shall abide and perform the award of Gervase Clifton, knight, William Hondforde and John Portyngton esquires by him chosen, Thomas Greseley knight, John Stathum esquire and Richard Byngham by Thomas Foljambe, or other like arbitrators, of of John archbishop of York, touching all appeals, causes, actions, debates etc between Thomas Foljambe, his tenants and servants and all appealed before the king for mayhem by the said Henry, and Henry Perponde, his tenants and servants and the said Margery, so that the award he delivered in writing under seal of arbitrators before Michaelmas next, or of the umpire before the feast of St Martin in winter.
    Cancelled upon the acknowledgment of Thomas Foljambe."
    "July 13 [1435] Thomas Foljambe esquire to Henry Perponde knight. (Like) recognisance, to be levied etc in Derbyshire.
    (Like) condition on behalf of the said Thomas, his servants and tenants and all appealed (as above).
    Cancelled upon the acknowledgment of Henry Perponde."
  14. "Political Society in Lancastrian England: The Greater Gentry of Nottinghamshire" by Simon J Payling, 1991, discusses, as the title suggests, the politics of Nottinghamshire and the surrounding area, mainly in the the 15th century. He covers the actions of Ralph, Lord Cromwell, his allies (which included the Stathams), and his feuds (against, amongst others, Henry, Lord Grey of Codnor).
  15. "Political Society in Lancastrian England" (14) stresses Cromwell's influence on John's appointment sheriff in 1435-6, 1437-8 (16), 1439-40, 1444-5 (25) & 1449-50 (26)(27). There is a suggestion he could still have been in office as late as 1453 (29).
  16. "Calendar of the Fine Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office" Vol XVII, 1937, page 10, notes an entry dated 23 Nov 1437 concerning the escheatry of various counties, which simply states :
    "John Stathum; Nottingham and Derby (vacated because nothing thereof was done)"
  17. "Calendar of the Fine Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office" Vol XVII, 1937, page 115, notes an entry dated 4 Dec 1439, which states :
    "Commitment to John Stathum, esquire, and John his son, by mainprise of John Tunstede of Wormele, co Derby, gentilman, and Robert Rasyn of Notyngham, co Nottingham, gentilman, of the keeping of the castle and lordship of Hereston, with all its appurtenances, co Derby; to hold the same from the time of the death of Richard Hastynges, knight, for 12 years, at a yearly farm of 11li; with proviso that if any other person shall be willing, byEaster next, to give more for the said keeping, then the said John and John shall be bound to pay such larger sum if they will have the keeping"
  18. Its not clear how long John held Horston castle. In 1439 it was granted to John Statham and his son John, from the death of Richard Hastings for 12 years (17). However four years later it was granted to John Statham, and his sons John, Thomas, Henry and Nicholas, for 40 years starting 5 years hence in 1448 (22). In 1451 it was again granted to John Statham and his son John, this time for 20 years (28), however, they surrendered it back to the king in July 1452 so that he could grant it to the Earls of Richmond and Pembroke (28). An article titled "Horston Castle; its Governors from the 12th to the 16th centuries" by F.N. Fisher in the Journal of the Derbyshire Archaeological and Natural History Society, Vol 59, lists John Statham and John his son, as governors from 1439-1443 and again from 1448-1453, with William Goureley in between.
  19. "Calendar of the Close Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office, Henry VI, Vol IV", 1937, page 30 contains the following entry :
    "William Sye of Henore co Derby, gentilman, John Perot of Underwoode co Nottingham, yoman, Richard Strete, husbondman, Richard de Draycote of Lescowe co Derby, husbondman, Walter de Draycote, husbondman, Luke de Draycote, colyer, John Stubley, laborer, and Richard Daucus, husbondman, all of the same, to John Stathum of Morley co Derby, esquire, Henry Stathum, John Stathum, both sons of John Stathum esquire, Nicholas Fitz William, Robert Fraunceys, Robert Barley, esquires, John Roley, esquire otherwise merchant, William Whityngton, William Bulloke of Onston, Robert Shoter, John Morten of Brayldeston, John Cruker of Twyforde, William Felde of Breyldeston, Richard Selyok of Norton and Thomas Prynce of Wyndley. Release of all actions of attaints and of decies tantum to this date. Dated 13 September 20 Henry VI [1441].
    Memorandum of acknowledgment at Chestrefelde on Saturday in the feast of Michaelmas before Thomas Fulthorp and William Ayscogh, by virtue of a dedimus potestatem which is on the chancery file for this year"

    Another similar entry on page 34 reads:
    "Richard de Hylton of Denby co Derby, nayler, John Coke of Selston co Nottingham, colyer, John Henryson, husbondman, John Bulker, laborer, Richard Turnour, turnour, John Baker, laborer, all of Selston, and John Geffrey of Sallowe co Derby, yoman, to John Stathum of Morley co Derby esquire, Henry Stathum and John Stathum, sons of John Stathum esquire, Nicholas Fitz William, Robert Fraunceys, Robert Barley, esquires, John Roley, esquire otherwise merchant, William Whityngton, William Bulloke of Onston, Robert Shoter, John Morten of Breyldeston, John Cruker of Twyforde, William Felde of Breyldeston, Richard Selyoke of Norton and Thomas Prynce of Wyndley. Release of all actions of attaints and of decies tantum to this date. Dated 13 September 20 Henry VI.
    Memorandum of acknowledgment at Chestrefelde on Saturday in the feast of Michaelmas before Thomas Fulthorp and William Ayscogh, by virtue of a dedimus potestatem which is on the chancery file for this year"
  20. "Calendar of the Close Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office, Henry VI, Vol IV", 1937, page 79 contains the following entry :
    "John Byroun knight, Robert de Clyfton, Henry del Bothe, Robert de Longley esquires, Peter de Longley paron of Prestwyche, John del Bothe and Thomas de Longley esquires to John Stathum esquire. Bond in 40 marks payable on Michaelmas day 1443. Dated Saturday the feast of St Thomas of Canterbury 20 Henry VI. [1st January 1442]
    Condition for voidance thereof, if Elizabeth daughter of Robert de Longley esquire shall before the day of payment die without issue male by Thomas son and heir of John Stathum esquire."
  21. "Derbyshire Feet of Fines 1323-1546", 1985, number 1095, reads :
    "Westminster. Easter three weeks 1443. P[laintiff]: John Stathum, esq. D[eforciant]: Thomas Okeover of Okover, esq. Concerning the manor of Caldelowe. Thomas acknowledged the manor to be the right of John and he remised and quitclaimed of, and warranted for, himself and his heirs to John and his heirs. John gave 100"
  22. "Calendar of the Fine Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office" Vol XVII", 1937, page 282, notes an entry dated 19 Nov 1443, which states :
    "Commitment to John Stathum, esquire, and to John, Thomas, Henry and Nicholas, his sons, by mainprise of Bartholomew Whitfeld of Heydour, co Lincoln, gentilman, and John de Carleton of Lyndryk, co Nottingham, yoman, of the keeping of the castle and lordship of Horeston (or whatever be the name by which they are known), co Derby, which were granted to Richard Hastynges knight, for the term of his life by Henry V, with reversion to the king and his heirs, and which are in the king's hand by the death of the said Richard; to hold the same from9 Setember 1448 for 40 years, at a yearly farm of 11li; for which answer has been made to the king, and an increment of 20s"
  23. John's grandmother Goditha owned the manor of Caldelowe, having survived a claim for it from the Okeover family; and in 1386, her son, and John's father, Thomas was named as heir apparent (2). According to "Derbyshire and the English Rising of 1381" by David Crooks, Historical Research, Vol 60, Issue 141, Feb 1987, pp 9-23, Thomas Okeover brought two more claims for the manor in 1407 and 1409. The outcome isn't known, but in 1431/32 John seemingly only owned half of the manor (10). The apparent purchase, by John, of the whole manor in 1443 (21), would seem to indicate that the manor eventually returned to the family, but exactly how much of it had been lost to the Okeovers, and for how long isn't clear.
  24. "Calendar of the Close Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office, Henry VI, Vol IV", 1937, page 236 contains the following entry :
    John Richardson, son and heir of Richard Jacson of Alsop, to John Stathum of Morley esquire and to his heirs. Quitclaim indented with warranty of all the lands etc in the town and fields of Alsop which Thomas Stathum [       *] of the said John Stathum, recovered from John Richardson at the assizes holden at Derby on Wednesday before St Chad 2 Henry VI [February 24th 1424], namely three tofts with three crofts adjacent called 'Overlauncrofte, Netherlauncrofte' and the 'Oleyarte', and five bovates of land, 8 acres of meadow and free rents, namely 14d a year of John de la Dale, 10d of the heirs of George de Sallowe, and 14d of the said John Richardson. Witnesses: Thomas de Alsope late of Alsope, John de Dale of Alsope, John Key of Colde Eyton. Dated Derby, the feast of St Margaret [July 20th] 22 Henry VI
    memorandum of acknowledgement at Derby 23 July before Ralph de la Pole, by virtue of a dedimus potestatem which is on the chancery file for this year.
    * A word erased, and not supplied
  25. "Calendar of the Fine Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office" Vol XVII, 1937, page 302-3 notes an entry dated 6 Nov 1444 listing John Stathum as sheriff of Nottingham and Derby.
  26. "Calendar of the Fine Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office" Vol XV9, 1939, page 145-6 notes an entry dated 11 Dec 1449 listing John Stathum as sheriff of Nottingham and Derby.
  27. "Calendar of the Fine Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office" Vol XV9, 1939, page 201, notes an entry dated 7 June 1451, which states :
    "Commitment to John Talbot, knight, by mainprise of John Wastnesse of Hedon, co Nottingham, esquire, and Thomas Nevyll of Darlyngton, co Nottingham, gentilman, of the keepimg of the manor of Bakewell, co Derby, which is in the king's hand by the death of John Helyon, tenant in chief of the king, and by reason of the minority of his heir; to hold from Easter last until the full age of the said heir, at a yearly farm of the 13li 6s 8d at which the said manor was extended before John Statham late esheator..."
  28. "Calendar of the Fine Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office" Vol XV9, 1939, page 239, notes an entry dated 4 Nov 1451, which states :
    "Commitment to John Stathum of Morley, esquire, and John Stathum, his son, by mainprise of John Bridde of Lokhawe, co Derby, gentilman, and Nicholas Stathum of Morley, co Derby, gentilamn, of the keeping of the castle and lordship of Horestone, by whatever name they be known, with all appurtenances, co Derby; to hold from Michaelmas last for 20 years, at a yearly farm of 12li
    [Schedule] Vacated, because on 4 July 31 Henry VI the king granted the said keeping to Edmund earl of Richmond and Jasper earl of Pembroke and to either of them, to hold to them and their heirs, under a certain form, and ordered that the chancellor should cancel the present latters, on their surrender into the Chancery for cancellation and that the keeper of the rolls of Chancery should annul the enrolment of the same, as appears by a certain petition presented to the king, signed by his hand, delivered to the said chancellor and filed in the Chancery. And the said John and John surrendered the present letters into the Chancery for cancellation. And so these letters are annulled and cancelled."
  29. "Calendar of the Patent Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office, Henry VI, Vol VI", 1910, page 6, lists a number of pardons, including an entry dated 26 January 1453, to :
    "Roger Brown of Snellyston, co Derby, husbondman, for not appearing before Richard Neuton and his fellows to answer John Stathum touching a debt of 40s."
  30. "The Descent of the Family of Statham", By Rev S P H Statham mentions an indenture dated 31st October 1453 made between John and the prior of Breadsall Park in 1453 [Additional Charters 5243, British Museum] ...
    in which it is agreed that for a sum of 7 marcs for the roofing of the priory church and for the glazing thereof the convent should henceforward say daily a "secretum", a collect, and a "post communion" for the souls of Godith, Thomas Elizabeth, Cecily and John, their heirs and successors for ever. It was also agreed that on the feast of the Eleven Thousand Virgins a Requiem Mass and other devotional exercise should be said.
    (The details match a similar description of this indenture given by Cox in "The Churches of Derbyshire", Volume 3, pages 71-2, sub Breadsall Priory; and also in the Victoria History of the County of Derbyshire, Volume 2, pages 54-66).
  31. "Notes on the Churches of Derbyshire", by J Charles Cox, 1875, Volume 4, page 329, within the chapter on Morley church, contains the following :
    The third memorial of John Stathum takes the form of a requiem plate, of most exceptional if not unique character, enjoying certain specific "benefactory prayers". It is most appropriately fixed against the south wall of the chancel, immediately over the piscina, so that the priest could not fail, whenever he approached the piscina for the ablutions, or to remove the cruets from the credence shelf within the niche, to be reminded of the obligations that were due from him to the memory of the pious family thereon enumerated. The following is the inscription :-
    ffor the sowles of Rafe Godyth Thoms Elisabeth Cecill and John & of theyr Successors & for all cristen Sowles Deyfundis &c : pater noster &c : Ave maria; et ne nos; reg et'nam &c : Due exandi oracoem : wt yis oriso Iuclina due &c : John Stathn ordyrd yis to be said and more writen in other divers bokis
  32. "Notes on the Churches of Derbyshire", by J Charles Cox, 1875, Volume 4, page 328, within the chapter on Morley church, contains the transcriptions of two commemorative brasses Firstly :
    "Orate pro anima Johanis Stathum Armigeri, quondam istius ville qui bene et notabilitier hanc ecclesiam egit qui obiit viio die Novembris Anno Domini Millesimo ccccliijo. Et pro anima Cecilie uxoris euis que obiit xxvo die Aprilis Anno Domini Millesimo ccccxliiijo quorum animabus propicietur deus"
    Secondly :
    Here lieth John Stathum Squyer somtyme lorde of this towne and Cecily his Wyfe. Which gat to yis Churche iii belles & ordyned iiis iiiid yerely for brede to be done in almes amonge pore folk of ys parisch in ye day of ye obit of dame Godith sometyme lady of ys towne. The said John died the vi day of November ye yere of our lord M cccc liiij and the said Cecily died the xxv day of April the yere of our lord M cccc xliiij of whos Sowles God have Mercy Amen.
    These two memorials differ as to the year of John's death - either 1453 or 1454. I am tempted to trust the brass which seems more likely to be contemporaneous, and gives the date as 1453, just a few days after John had agreed to pay Breadsall Priory for prayers for his soul. The wording of the other brass, seems likely to be a little later in date, and so less likely to have the correct date.



Notes:


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