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Hugh de Acovere

circa late 1150s - aft 1215

Father Ralph son of Orm
Mother a daughter of Robert de Blore ?
Wife unknown
Children Robert


Hugh was probably born in Okeover (1) around the late 1150s (2), the son of Ralph (4)(20)(31). He had an elder half brother Richard (20)(31), a younger brother Geoffrey (12)(20)(33), and probably a sister Alice (39). He may also have had another younger brother William (9).

Whilst Hugh was still a minor his half brother Richard, having already married and been granted part of the family's lands at Snelston, died young, thus making Hugh heir apparent to his father (20).

Around 1280, he was granted his father's old lands in Okeover from Burton Abbey (3). He also held lands in Ilam and Calton (4). Similarly the Earl of Derby granted him the manor of Caldelowe, which his father had held before him (5). He also inherited lands in Snelston (12).

He bought the manor of Shene from Bertram de Verdun, Baron of Alton, in about 1189 (6). (His brother Geoffrey was a witness to the transaction), and it was confirmed to him by Bertram's son Nicholas at the start of the 13th century (7). He is also shown as holding it at around the same time in the Burton Cartulary (8).

At the turn of the 13th century, he was responsible for the upkeep of some un-named woodland (10)(11), although its not clear where - it could have been in Atlow, where he also had lands (13)(36), or possibly in Stretton, which had links to Bromley Wood (37).

Hugh granted most of the remainder of the family's lands in Snelston (that which had not formerly belong to his half-brother Richard), to his brother Geoffrey (12) (after which Geoffrey was sometimes called "Geofrey of Snelston" (13)). Hugh retained control of two thirds of Richard's prior holding, which he rented to Richard's widow Margaret, who held her third as dower. He also seemingly retained a small amount of the estate himself (33). Its not clear how long this division of the lands had been in place when in 1204 William de Montgomery, a distant cousin of Margaret, started legal proceedings against both Hugh and Geoffrey over all the Snelston lands. This suit dragged on until 1207, when it was found in favour of Hugh (20)(21)(28)(22)(23)(24)(25)(26)(27)(29)(30)(31)

At the same time as Hugh was in dispute over Snelston, he was also in dispute with Ralph de Blore over lands in Swinscoe (14)(15)(16)(17)(18)(19)(21)(28)(22)(23)(24)(25)(26)(27)(29)(30). It's possible that this case stems from Hugh's mother being the daughter of Robert de Blore, and bringing the Swinscoe lands with her on her marriage (38). Whatever the background, Hugh won the case in 1207 and Swinscoe remained in the family (31).

Hugh appears to have been knighted towards the end of his life, as no record of him being a knight is found before 1208, when he was styled a knight when testifying on the health of someone who missed court appearance due to ill health (32). He was given a similar task again in 1212, but then failed to appear in court himself. The sheriff was ordered to arrest him (34), and so a month later he appeared and gave his evidence (35).

His only known child was a son Robert , who became the "landlord" of Hugh's lands at Atlow, having had the rents granted to him as a marriage settlement (36).

He was still alive in 1215/16, when he came into possession of some more land in Stretton, that had previously been held by his sister Alice (39), who had presumably died without an heir. Nothing more is known of him after this date, but it seems likely he was dead by 1220 when his son Robert was summoned onto a jury (43), presumably having succeeded him.


Brief details of his children:



Sources:

  1. Okeover was seemingly his father's main residence, so it seems likely that Hugh was born there.
  2. Hugh's date of birth cannot be estimated with any great degree of confidence. However, as he was granted the manor of Okeover sometime between 1178-1182 (3), it is highly likely that either his father died or Hugh reached adulthood, sometime shortly beforehand. As no record of his father is found after the early 1160s, I tend towards Hugh being born around the late 1150s
  3. "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", New Series, Vol 7, 1904. "An account of the family of Okeover of Okeover - Okeover Deeds", no 8, on p132 reads:
    Sciant, etc., quod ego Rogerus Abbas, etc., Burtonie, etc., confirmavimus Hugoni filio Radulfi de Acoure et heredibus suis terram et tenuram suam quam habet in Acoure in feudo et hercditate, de nobis tenendam ita libere et quiete sicut Radulfus ejus pater tenuit, reddendo nobis annuatim duas marcas argenti ad festum Sancti Martini. Testes Willelmus Decanus de Tattunhull, Robertus de Stapenhull, Ailwinus capellanus, Robertus de London, Galfridus Salvagius, Radulfus filius Radulfi, Richerus frater ejus, Robertus de Greseleia et Henricus frater ejus, Henricus de Lega, Nicholaus filius Johannis de Wilintone, Ricardus de Lega, Reginaldus de Sancto Albano, Simon Pugil, Matheus frater ejus, Jordanus de Povele*
    * Okeover Chartulary, Bodleian Library. The Abbot Roger was elected in 1178, and died in 1182.
    Of the witnesses, Geoffrey Savage held Tissington under the Earls of Ferrers. Robert de Gresley was the head of the house of Gresley, which held three knights' fees of the Earls of Ferrers at Lullington, Gresley, Linton, and other places.
    Henry de Lega was the tenant of the Abbot at Leigh in Staffordshire.

    A transcript also appears in "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", Vol 5, Part 1, 1884. "The Burton Chartulary", page 40.
  4. "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", Vol 5, 1884. "The Burton Chartulary", entry in folio 68, on p69 reads:
    Omnibus etc. Hugo de Acovera salutem etc. Noverit etc. me et heredes meos tenuimus Abbati et Conventui etc. pro villa de Acovera et de Ylum et terra de Casturne quas de eis tenemus in duabus marcis argenti fldeliter persolvendis in die Sancti Martini attornato eorum apud Ylum sicut persolvere consuevi apud Burtonam sine difficultate etc.
    In the margin is a duplicate transcript of the grant of Acovera to Ralph, son, of Orm, by the Abbot Robert; the witnesses are given at full length in this copy ; they are Jordan, Prior, Briennius, Willelmus de Sanato Albano, et ceteri monachi Ecclesice predictę. Deinde Galfridus de Bakepuz, Radulfus de Mongomery, Galfridus de Tatenhulle, Willelmus de Wynsulle, Godewinus de Brontiston, et Leufricus.
  5. "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", New Series, Vol 7, 1904. "An account of the family of Okeover of Okeover - Okeover Deeds", no 9, on p132-133 reads:
    Carta Willehni de Ferrariis Comitis Derbeye facta Hugoni de Acouere de villa de Caldelowe
    Sciant omnes presentes et futuri quod ego Willelmus de Ferrariis comes Derbeye concessi et hac carta mea confirmavi Hugoni de Acovere et heredibus suis totam villam de Caldelovve cum omnibus pertinentiis suis sine omni (
    sic) diminutione et decremento tenendam de me et heredibus meis sibi et heredibus suis jure hereditario libere quiete et integre. Reddendo inde annuatim mihi et heredibus meis xxti sex solidos firme albe et unam marcam argenti de cremento de denariorum numero et preterea xxti denarios per annum ut ipse Hugo et heredes sui et omnes sui quieti sint de omnibus defectibus in murariis de Wapintake scilicet unam medietatem totius illius firme ad pascham et aliam medietatem ad festum sancti michaelis et faciendo sectam molendini de Wyrkeswurth et sectam de Wapintake de Wyrkesworth ad quelibet placita rationabilia de Wapintake sicut antiquitus fieri solet et unam arruram per annum de omnibus carucis de villa de Caldelawe ad cibum meura salvis et quietis prefato Hugoni et heredibus suis propriis carucis suis et unam scuram (sic) per annum similiter ad cibum meum. Quando vero dominus Rex talliabit sua dominia et maneria per Angliam predictus Hugo vel heredes sui persoluent mihi vel heredibus meis dimidiam marcam argenti pro omni tallagio et tali exactione. Concessi etiam eidem Hugoni et heredibus suis libertatem emendandi villam de Caldelawe omnibus modis ad majorem profectum suum et heredum suorum. Hiis testibus Roberto filio Walclini Roberto de Pir(ario) Willelmo de Staunton, Galfrido de Acouere, Waltero de Rideware, Rogero de Wednislega, Rondulfo de Alsop, Galfrido de Bee, Roberto de Thorp, Jordano de Sniterton, Hugone de Meleburi, Ricardo de Benetle, Hugone Morel, Roberto de Huncedon et multis aliis.
    From the Okeover Chartulary, Wood MS., Bodleian Library, fol. 32. Respecting the witnesses, Geoffrey de Acovere was brother of Sir Hugh de Acovere, and occurs in a suit of 7 John (1205), Vol. III, Staffordshire Collections, p. 133.
    Walter de Rideware was of Ridware, co. Stafford; Roger de Wednislege (Wendesley) held half of Mapleton under the Earl.
    Geoffrey de Bee held a moiety of Hilton and Somersall.

    On pages 9-10 of the same volume, the following commentary is also given:
    "Hugh also obtained from William, Earl of Ferrars, a confirmation of the grant of Caldelowe, but in curious contrast to the original grant which left the tenure quite indefinite, the service due is detailed with unusual minuteness. The deed states that Hugh and his heirs were to render 26s. annually "firme albe," i.e., in dealbated or purified money, and a mark of increment viz., an increased rent in money by tail (numero) (as distinguished from pure money) and twenty pence annually in addition, for which he and his heirs were to be quit of all demands for defensive works (murariis) within the wapentake, but they were to do suit to the mill of Wyrkesworth and also to the wapentake of Wyrkesworth for such reasonable pleas of the wapentake as was formerly done. He was also to give a day's ploughing with all the ploughs of the vill towards the Earl's support (ad cibum meum), but his own ploughs were to be exempt from this service, and he was also to give a scuram[1] annually for the Earl's support (ad cibum meum). When the King raised a talliage throughout his demesne lands, the said Hugh and his heirs were to pay to the Earl and his heirs half a mark of money, and the Earl conceded finally that he and his heirs might make what improvements they pleased within the vill of Caldelowe, by which is meant that they might enclose the waste lands of the manor [2] As Mr. Oswald Barron well remarks in his account of the Okeovers, "these tenures give us something of the life of these old knights; the king's writ and the lord's summons ran here and there calling them to war, council or services, and the furthest township stirs with a life unguessed by those who would take their pictures of old England from the dull round of such villages as have in our day escaped the factory, or the builder of 'the residential neighbourhood.'"
    [1] Probably "scour," i.e., for the cleansing or weeding of the land
    [2] The presence of Robert de Gresley as a witness to this deed shows it must be anterior to 1183 ; see "the Gresleys of Drakelowe," Vol. I, New Series of Staffordshire Collections, p. 32
    " Note that Wrottesley claims this confirmation was prior to 1183 by virtue of the mention of Robert de Gresley. However as far as I can tell Robert de Gresley has nothing to do with this deed. Nevertheless, I would expect Hugh to have come into all his father's old lands at around the same time, so this may well have been just prior to 1183.
  6. "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", New Series, Vol 7, 1904. "An account of the family of Okeover of Okeover - Okeover Deeds", no 13, on p135-136 reads:
    Carta Bertrami de Verdun facia Hugoni de Acoure de terra de Schene.
    Bertramus de Verdon omnibus hominibus suis et amicis tarn presentibus quam futuris salutem Sciatis me concessisse et hac presenti carta mea confirmasse Hugoni de Acoure et heredibus suis totam terrarn de Schene cum omnibus pertinentiis suis in bosco et in piano in pratis et pascuis in viis et semitis in aquia et in moris, et in communis et in omnibus locis et rebus ad eandem terram pertinentibus. Ad tenendum de me et de heredibus meis liberam et solutam et quietam ab omni exactione et servicio mihi et heredibus meis pertinente: Reddendo annuatim mihi et heredibus meis triginta sex solidos et octo denarios pro omni servicio ad duos terminos scilicet decem octo solidos et quatuor denarios ad Pascham floridum et decem octo solidos et quatuor denarios ad festum Sancti Michaelis. Concessi autem eidem Hugoni et heredibus suis hanc libertatem tali conditione quod nulli homines religionis neque averia hominum religiorum recolligent in terra sua de Schene sine concensu meo vel heredum meorum. Retinui vero michi et heredibus meis Wartpeny et Peterspeny de predicta terra et quod idem Hugo et heredes sui venient ad efforciamentum curie mee, sed tamen ad meam. rationabilem summonitionem vel Senescalli mei. Idem autem Hugo dedit mihi pro hoc fine libertatis hujus quem ei concessi et heredibus suis centum solidos et unum palefridurn. Hiis testibus Thoma Abbate de Valle Sancte Marie de Crokesdena, Ada de Aldethlega, Roberto de Verdon, Ernaldo Senescallo meo, Ada filio Ade de Aldithlega, Henrico de Prayers, Rogero Bagot, Willelmo Panton, .Willelmo de Ippestanes, Willelmo filio Radulfi, Herberto fratre Willelmi de Ippestanes, Milone de Verdon, Norrrianno Panton, Galfrido de Acovere, Henrico de Wutton et multis aliis.*
    * From the Okeover Chartulary, Bodleian Library, Oxford. Wood MS. No. 6.
    The donor is Bertram de Verdun, the head of the baronial house of Verdun of Alton, now represented by the Earls of Shrewsbury. He joined the Crusade of 1190, and died Governor of Joppa in 1192. Adam de Aldithlega, the first lay witness, was the head of the house of Audley, and held Audley, Heley, and other places under Bertram ; all the other witnesses can be readily identified from the Staffordshire Collections. William Panton was nephew of Bertram, his mother Aline de Verdun, sister of Bertram, having married his father Ivo Pantulf. Norman Panton was brother of William and therefore another nephew of Bertram, William de Ipstanes was a third nephew, being the son of Herbert, brother to Bertram. Vol. I, Staff. Coll., p. 75.

    On pages 10-11 of the same volume, the following commentary is also given:
    "In 1189 King Richard and his Barons who had assumed the Cross were raising money for the Crusade. Amongst the latter was Bertram de Verdun, the Baron of Alton, who obtained from the monks of Burton a sum of money by selling to them the manor and advowson of Stapenhill [1], and from Hugh de Okeover he obtained a further sum of money and a palfrey by the sale to him of the manor of Shene in co. Stafford. For this grant, however, Hugh was to render annually 36s. 8d., and he and his heirs were to appear at the Barons' Court for the reinforcements of the Court "ad efforciamentum Curie" at the reasonable summons of himself or of his steward[2]. Bertram also reserved for himself and his heirs, wardpenny and Peterspenny from the land, and there was a curious proviso that no men of religion or their cattle should be allowed on the lands, without the consent of Bertram or his heirs. After the death of Bertram, who died at Joppa in 1192, his son Nicholas de Verdun confirmed this grant to Hugh with an additional clause acquitting him and his heirs of any scutage appertaining to the land [3].
    [1] Burton Chartulary, pp. 42, 43.
    [2] Deed No. 13. The reinforcement of the Court would be;required on the occasions of the trial of a thief or when the King's writ of right was sent to the Court. The latter writ was issued on the appeal of a litigant in the court, who complained that justice had not been done to him, and was so called from the words "de recto defecisse," which occur in the writ. It is sometimes called the lesser writ of right to distinguish it from the King's writ which permitted himself to be sued in a Court of Law.
    [3] Deed No. 15 (7)
    "
  7. "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", New Series, Vol 7, 1904. "An account of the family of Okeover of Okeover - Okeover Deeds", no 15, on p137 reads:
    Sciant omnes presentes et futuri quod ego Nicholaus de Verdun concessi et presenti carta mea confirmavi Hugoni de Acouere et heredibus suis totam terrain de Schene cum omnibus pertinenciis habendam et tenendam de me et heredibus meis sibi et heredibus suis. Reddendo inde annuatim triginta sex solidos et octo denarios ad duos terminos scilicet ad pascha floridum xviii solidos et iiij denarios et ad festum sancti michaelis xviii solidos et iiij denarios pro omni servicio et exactione mihi vel heredibus meis pertinente et cum omnibus libertatibus et liberis consuetudinibus sicut carta domini patris mei Bertrami de Verdun testatur. Et preterea ego Nicholaus de Verdun et heredes mei quietclamavimus et adquietabimus predictum Hugonem de Acouere et heredes suos ab omnibus scutagiis et ab omni exactione scutagii predicte terre pertinentibus. Hiis testibus Willelmo Panton Radulpho filio Jordani Roberto de Campafl Willelmo de Ippistanes Henrico de Denstone Henrico de Wottori Elya clerico Milone de Verdun Willelmo de Warewic Thoma de Stantona et multis aliis.*
    * Okeover Chartulary, Bodleian Library, fol 7. Nicholas de Verdun succeeded his brother Thomas, in 1200 or 1201 (Pipe Rolls, Vol. II, Staff. Collections).
  8. "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", Vol 5, Part 1, 1884. "The Burton Chartulary", folio 29, on page 45 reads:
    De Advocatione Gapellce de SCHONA.[1]
    Universis etc. Hugo de Acoura salutem. Ad universitatis nostrse noticiam volo pervenire me nicbil juris habere in advocatione Capellffi de Scona neque Capellse de Acoura nee aliquem antecessorum meorum unquam habuisse quse quia sunt et semper fuerunt Capellse Ecclesiae de Ylum. Ecclesia autem de, Ylum Abbati et Conventui Burtonensi in proprios usus canonice appropriata est cum omnibus capellis suis et pertinentiis. Et si aliquando presumptive dixerim me aliquid juris habere in advocatione Ecclesise de Ylum sive alicujus capellse suse etc. ego dicto juri advocatione et appellatione spontanefi, voluntate renuncio etc.

    [1] Shene in Staffordshire was given or sold to Hugh de Acoure by Bertram de Verdun temp. H. II., or early in Ric. I, (Dugdale's MSS.)
  9. "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", Vol 2, Part 1, "Staffordshire Pipe Rolls", entry on page 74 reads:
    10 Richard I (1197-98)
    Nova Oblata.
    ... Et de dimid. marc, de Hugone de Acoure de misericordia. ...

    An entry from the Derbyshire Pipe Roll from the same year is also given on page 75 :
    Willelmus de Acov'e debet dimid. marc, pro falso clameo.
    "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", New Series, Vol 7, gives the following commentary on these entries on page 11 :
    On the Staffordshire Pipe Roll of 10 Ric I. (1197-98) 'Hugh de Acoure is returned as owing half a mark for a misericordia, i.e., for a fine imposed upon him in some legal proceedings, and on the Derbyshire Roll of the same year a William de Acovere, who is probably his brother, is returned as owing half a mark for a false claim.
  10. "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", Vol 2, Part 1, "Staffordshire Pipe Rolls", entry on page 95 reads:
    2 John (1199-1200)
    De Placitis Forestę per Hugonem de Nevill
    ... Hugo de Acovere ii. marc, pro quodam mendatio de foresta sibi imposito. ...

    "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", New Series, Vol 7, gives the following commentary on this entry on page 11 :
    On the Staffordshire Pipe Roll of 2 John (1199-1200) Hugh de Acoure is returned as owing two marks for a repair in the forest (mendatio de foresta), which had been imposed upon him. The fine was paid in the following year5 but it is difficult to understand, for there is no forest in Staffordshire in the neighbourhood of Okeover.
    [5] Staffordshire Collections, Vol III, p 130
  11. "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", Vol 2, Part 1, "Staffordshire Pipe Rolls", entry on page 103/4 reads:
    3 John (1200-1201)
    De Placitis Forestę per Hugonem de Nevill
    ... Hugo de Acoure r.e. de ii. marc, pro quodam mendacio sibi imposito In th'ro lib. E. Q. E. ...
  12. "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", New Series, Vol 7, 1904. "An account of the family of Okeover of Okeover - Okeover Deeds", no 14, on p136-137 reads:
    Sciant presentes et futuri quod ego Hugo de Acouere dedi concessi et hac carta mea confirmavi Galfrido fratri meo pro homagio suo et servicio totam terram meam in Snelliston que fuit Ricardi fratris mei cum omnibus pertinentiis suis et libertatibus sicut antecessores mei melius earn tenuerunt excepto quod in manu mea et heredum meorum retineo servicium Roberti de Stanton de terra quam Colbanus tenuit in eadem villa cum omnibus pertinentiis et libertatibus ad eandem terram pertinentibus et cultura juxta molendinum que est inter dominia et veterem cursum Duve salua semper sede et stangno molendini cum parua insula predicto Galfrido et heredibus suis tenendam de me et heredibus meis. Et si forte predicta cultura per predictum molendinum vel stangnum ad detrimentum meum vel heredum meorum iminuatur per visum legalum virorum ex utraque parte mihi vel heredibus meis emendetur. Hanc vero terram concessi predicto Galfrido et heredibus suis tenendam de me et heredibus meis in feudo et hereditate libere et quiete et honoriffice ab omni servicio et consuetudine ad me vel ad heredes meos pertinente saluo forinseco servicio. Reddendo inde annuatim mihi et heredibus meis decem solidos argenti ad festum sancti Martini. Si autem contigerit predictum Galfridum sine herede de carne sua exiente abiisse tota terra memorata cum omnibus pertinentiis ad me vel ad heredes meos reuertetur. Ut autem hec mea donacio et concessio et confirmacio processu temporis locum firmitatis optineant presentem cartam sigilli mei munimine roborari dignum duxi. Hiis testibus Willelmo Comite de Ferrariis Willelmo de Rideware tune senescallo, Galfrido Saluagio, Jordano de Tolka, Rogero de Ridewar, Galfrido de Costenton, Radulpho filio Jordani, Roberto de Appelby, Willelmo de Grendon, Radulpho filio Nicholai, Johanne filio Herberti, Henrico de Breillsford, Nicholao de Cariland, Eytrop de Ossemundeston et pluribus aliis*
    * Okeover Chartulary, Bodleian Library, fol 24.
  13. "Okeover of Okeover" archive at Derbyshire Record Office. Item ref D231M/T131, catalogue entry reads:
    Release by Herbert de Merle and Margaret his wife of all their right of common in a wood of Lord Hugh called Winnedun in Mulneclif who undertake that if the said Hugh wishes to make a fishpond or park, they will not prevent him, according to the agreement made when they received the land of Atlow by gift of Lord Hugh
    Witnesses: Robert de Ferrars, Hugh de Brailesford, Robert de Stanton, William de Stanton, Geoffrey de Snelleston [Shelston], William de Grid, [?Grindon], Ralph de [Bakepus], Roger de Wednesle [Wensley?], Ralph Alesop, Jordon de Snitt[ert] on, Robert de Bradburn [Bradbourne], William de [Tissington] clerk, Robert de Thorp and many others

    An abstract and transcript also appears in "Descriptive catalogue of Derbyshire charters", Jeayes, as entry 135. In this Lord Hugh is identified as "de Okeover", and it is dated to the late twelfth century.
  14. "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", Vol 3, Part 1, "Staffordshire Suits - Assize Roll", entry on page 87 reads:
    5 John
    Staffs. Radulphus de Bloie versus Hugonem de Acoure, de placito terrę, per Johannem Pachet.
  15. "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", Vol 3, Part 1, "Staffordshire Suits - Assize Roll", entry on page 109 reads:
    5 John
    Staffs. Assisa venit recognitura si Hugo de Acovere injuste et sine judicio dissaisivit Radulfum de Blora de communa pasturę sua in Swinescho, quę pertinet ad liberum tenementum suum in Blora post coronationem domini Regis apud Cantuar. Et Juratores dicunt quod ita dissaisivit eum: Ideo Judicium: Radulfus habeat seisinam suam, et Hugo in misericordia. Dampnum xij. d. misericordia (sic).
  16. "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", Vol 3, Part 1, "Staffordshire Suits - Assize Roll", entry on page 117 reads:
    5 John
    Staff. Assisa venit recognitura si Radulfus pater Hugonis [de Okovre] seisitus fuit in dominico suo ut de feudo de viij. acris terrę cum pertinentiis in Swinestoh. die qua obiit, etc.; quam terram Radulphus de Blore tenet. Et Juratores dicunt quod ipse ita obiit seisitus de ij. acris illius terrę, et non de pluribus; et ideo Hugo habeat seisinam de illis ij. acris terrę; et Radulphus in misericordia, et Hugo similiter in misericordi& pro falso clameo.
  17. "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", Vol 3, Part 1, "Staffordshire Suits - Assize Roll", entry on page 120 reads:
    5 John
    Staffs. Radulphus de Blore petit versus Hugonem de Akoure L acras terrę cum pertinentiis in Blore.
  18. "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", Vol 3, Part 1, "Staffordshire Suits - Assize Roll", entry on page 121 reads:
    5 John
    Staffs. Radulphus de Blore petit versus Hugonem de Acoure, j. acram terras cum pertinentiis in Blore, ut jus suum et Hugo petit inde visum. Visum habeat. Dies datus est eis apud Hereford a vigilia Sancti Michaelis in xv. dies et interim flat visus. Preceptum est Vicecomiti, etc.
  19. "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", Vol 3, Part 1, "Staffordshire Suits - Assize Roll", entry on page 128 reads:
    5 John
    Radulphus de Blore optulit se versus Hugonem de Akoure, qui se essoniaverat de malo lecti de placito terręe, et ipse non venit, nec iiij visores; scilicet, Oliverus filius Nigelli, Willielmus de Ypestanes, Robertus de Fereres, Willielmus de Oheteleton, et ideo attachientur quod sint in octobis Sancti Yllarii ad testiflcandum visum suum et qua die, etc.
  20. "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", Vol 2, Part 1, "Pipe Rolls", entry on page 129/30 from the Notts and Derby Pipe roll reads:
    7 John (1204-1205)
    Nova oblata.
    Hugo de Acoure r.c. de xx.s. pro habenda loquela coram Rege inter ipsum et.Willelmum de Mungumeri de tenemento de Snelleston. In th'ro lib. E. Q. E.

    "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", New Series, Vol 7, gives the following additonal information on page 12-14 :
    "On the Derbyshire Pipe Roll of 7 John (1204-5) Hugh de Acoure pays 20s that the suit between him and William de Mungumeri might be heard Coram Regi, i.e. in the King's Court, and the record of this suit is fortunately preserved upon an undated fragment of a "Curia Regis" Roll. It states that -
    Derby. Hugh de Akoure sued William de Mungumeri in a plea, that he should accept his homage and a reasonable relief for the freehold which he held of him in Snelleston, and William appeared and denied that Hugh held the freehold; Hugh replied that he was in seisin of the tenement, as warrantor for Margaret the wife of Roger Putrel, who held a part of it in dower, of the gift of Richard brother of Hugh, formerly husband of Margaret, because the tenement was the right and inheritance of the father of the said Hugh and his ancestors, and the father of Hugh had done homage for it to Walter de Mungumeri the grandfather of William, and Hugh himself had done homage for it to William the father of the said William. And he further said that Richard his brother by another wife had married Margaret with the consent of his father, so that his father had given the tenement to him for his support, and Richard had endowed her with a third part of it, and Richard had died in the life-time of his father, and Margaret had retained possession of the whole tenement, and the father of Hugh had served out a writ (here some words are illegible), and it had been covenanted between them that she should hold one-third of the tenement as dower and should hold the other two-thirds of him, rendering annually half a mark for it, and she had paid the half mark all the life-time of his father, and after his death to him, as heir of his father, and in this way he was in seisin of the tenement.
    "William stated that the tenement should revert to him through defect of heirs, because Walter his grandfather had granted it in marriage to Ralph the father of Hugh with Lettice his sister, by whom he had a son, viz., the said Richard, who had died without leaving any issue, and he asked for a great assize to determine which of them had the greater right to the tenement. A day was given to the parties at three weeks from Easter Day at Westminster."1
    The next appearance of the suit occurs in a sitting of the "Curia Regis" at Portsmouth on the morrow of Holy Trinity, 7 John (6 June, 1205)1 under the heading of Nottingham; it says that the suit between Hugh de Akoure and William de Mungumeri was respited sine die because the said William was in the service of the King in arms with the Earl of Ferrers, and the suit between the said William and Geoffrey de Akoure was respited for the same cause, and because one suit depends on the other, the suit between the said Hugh and Roger Putrel and Margery his wife2 - The rest of the sentence is illegible, but it will be perceived that two other suits had arisen out of the original plea between William de Montgomery and Hugh.
    A verdict was delivered in favour of Hugh de Okeover at Michaelmas 9 John (1207), the suit in the meantime having taken the form of an assize of "mord-ancestor": it is entered on the Roll as follows :-
    "Derby. An assize to determine whether Richard the brother of Hugh de Acoure was seised in his demesne as of fee of two carucates of land in Snelleslund (sic) on the day he died, which land was held by Walter de Mungumeri who had called William de Mungumeri to warrant it to him.
    "The jury found that he was so seised, and Walter was therefore in misericordia for an unjust detention, and Hugh was to have seisin of the land."3.
    Walter de Montgomery I conclude had been enfeofifed in the land by William de Montgomery, and had taken possession of it.
    During the same period, Sir Hugh was suing Roger Putrel and Margaret the wife of Roger for the land they held in Snelston. The Fine Roll of John states that Hugh de Acoure paid 10 marks that six freemen of co. Stafford and six of co. Derby might be elected to return a verdict between him and Roger Purcel (sic) and Margaret his wife respecting two carucates of land in Snelleston: and the Sheriffs of those two counties were ordered to elect six of each. This is one of the earliest notices of the election of a common jury which occurs on the Rolls.
    The suit came on at Hillary term 8 John (1207) at Westminster, when the Roll states that "an assize was formed to determine whether Richard the brother of Hugh de Acoure was seised of the service, as of fee, of one carucate of land and a half, in Snelleslund (sic) (Snelstoae) on the day he died, and which land was held by Roger Putrel and Margery his wife, who called to warranty William de Mungumeri, who appeared in Court and warranted the land to them, and called to warranty Walter de Mungumeri, and he asked for the assistance of the Court (to compel the attendance of Walter). A day was given to the parties at the octaves of the Purification."[4]
    No further notice of this suit remains, but it shows that Roger Putrel and Margaret had taken sides with the Montgomerys, and had refused to render any rent or service for the land to Hugh. The ultimate result of all the suits was to leave the manor in the possession of Hugh de Okeover.
    [1] Staffordshire Collections, Vol. III, p. 130.
    [2] Ibid., p. 133.
    [3] Ibid., p. 140.
    [4] Ibid., p. 138.

    The above cited entries from the Curia Regis Rolls are as follows:
    "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", Vol 3, Part 1, page 130-31 reads:
    ROLL No. 52. TEMP. JOHN.
    A fragment undated; probably Hillary Term, 6 John (13th January, 1205).3
    m. 4, apud Lichfeld,
    Derebi. Hugo de Akoure petiit versus Willelmum de Mungumeri, quod capiat homagium et rationabilem relevium suum de libero tenemento suo quod de eo tenet et tenere clamat in Snelleston, et Willelinus venit et dicit quod Hugo non tenet tenementum illud et ideo ad hoc breve, ut ei videtur, non vult ei respondere. Et Hugo venit et dicit quod ipse est in seisina illius tenementi, ut ille qui est warrantus Margaretę uxoris Rogeri Putrel, cujus dos pars tenementi illius est, ex dono Ricardi fratris ipsius Hugonis, quondam viri ipsius Margaretę, quia tenementum illud fuit jus et hereditas patris ipsius Hugonis et antecessorum suoram, ita quod pater ipsius Hugonis fecit inde homagium Waltero de Mungumeri, avo ipsias Willelmi, et ipsemet Hugo fecit inde homagium Willelmo patri predicti Willelmi. Dicit etiam Hugo quod Ricardus frater suus de alia uxore, duxit in uxorem predictam Margaretam per concessum patris sui, ita quod pater suus dedit eidem Ricardo ad se sustendandum totum predictum tenementum, et ipse dotavit earn de tertia parte illius tenementi . . . . . quod Ricardus obiit prius quarn pater suus, et uxor ejus Margareta tenuit se in totum tenementum, et pater ejusdem Hugonis perquisivit breve de . . . . . . convenitur inter eos quod ipsa haberet in dotem tertiam partem et duas partes teneret de eo reddendo per annum dimid: marc: ita quod illam dimidiam marcam patri suo reddidit tota vita sua et post . . . . eidem Hugoni qui heres est patris sui, et ideo ipse est in seisina ipsius tenementi, et Willelmus dicit quod tenementum illud debet ad eum revertere pro defectu heredis, sicut illud quod avus suus Walterus dedit in maritagium Radulpho patri ipsius Hugonis cum Letitia sua sorore, ex qua habuit filium, scilicet predictum Ricardum, qui sine herede de corpore suo obiit, et petit magnam assisam domini Regis ut recognoscatur utrum ipse majus jus habeat . . . . . . . . . . . Dies datue est . . . . . a die Paschee in iij. septimanis apud Westmonasterium . . . . . Rogerus Putrel et Margareta uxor ejus . . . . . . . (
    the rest illegible)
    [3]Hugh de Oakover's fine for this suit was paid before Michaelmas, 1205. See p. 130, vol. 2, of Collections,

    "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", Vol 3, Part 1, page 133-34 reads:
    Headed," Placito apud Portasmuth, coram domino Bege rotulata, in crastino Sanctce Trinitatis, anno septimo regni Regis Johannis" [6th June, 1205].
    Notingham. Loquela inter Hugonem de Akoure et Willelmum de Mungumeri, de audiendo judieio suo de terra, sine die, eo quod Willelmus est in servitio domini Regis cum Comite de Ferrariis, cum equis et armis. Loquela inter eundem Willelmum et Gaufridum de Akoure de audiendo judicio suo de quadam assisa novę dissaisinte, eadem de causa, et quia una loquela pendit ex alia et loquela inter predictum Hugonem et Rogerum Putrel et Margeriam uxorem suam de placito, quod clamat
    (rest illegible), m. 2, dorso.
    "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", Vol 3, Part 1, page 140 is below
    "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", Vol 3, Part 1, page 138 reads:
    ROLL No. 30. Headed, " Placita apud Westmonasterium in octabis . . . . regni Regis J. . . . . (rest illegible), Hillary term, 8 John 1 [January, 1207].
    Derebi. Assisa venit recognitura si Ricardus frater Hugonis de Acoure, saisitus fuit in servitio suo et de feodo, de i. carucata teme et dimid: in Snelleslund die quo obiit, etc., quam terrain Rogerus Putrell et Margeria uxor ejus tenent, qui vocaverunt ad warantum Willelmum de Mungumeri, qui venit et warantizat, et vocavit ad warantum Walterum de Mungumeri et petit auxilium curię.2 Habeat. Dies datus est eis in octavis Purificationis [9th February, 1207] coram Domino Rege, et omnes recognitores attachientur preter Walterum de Fuleford. Willelemus ponit loco suo Eobertum Walensem. m. 1.
    [1] This date is taken from the essoins on the same Roll. See further on [2] Petit auxilium curię, i.e., to enforce the attendance of Walter de Montgomery, the warrantor.
  21. "Curia Regis Rolls of the reigns of Richard I and John - 7-8 JOHN". Entry on p19 reads:
    [1204]
    Notingh'.- Loquela inter Hugonem de Akovr' et Willelmum de Mungumeri de clacito (sic) audiendi judicium suum de terra est sine die eo quod Willelmus in servitio domini regis cum comite de Ferrarriis cum equis et armnis (sic). Loquela inter eundem Willelmum et Gaufridum de Akovr' de audiendo judicio suo de quadam assisa nove dissaisine eadem de causa et quia una loquela pendet ex alia. Et loquela inter predictum Hugonem et Rogerum Putrel et Margeriam uxorem suam de placito quid clamant in terra unde predicta loquela ...... et quis est warantus ipsius Margerie inde similiter sine die .......... loquelis. Et sciendum quod Hugo ponit loco suo ............ quando resummonita erit.
  22. "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", Vol 3, Part 1, "Staffordshire Suits - Assize Roll", entry on page 130/18 reads:
    A fragment undated; probably Hillary Term, 6 John (13th January, 1205).[3]
    m. 4, apud Lichfeld,
    Derebi. Hugo de Akoure petiit versus Willelmum de Mungumeri, quod capiat homagium et rationabilem relevium suum de libero tenemento suo quod de eo tenet et tenere clamat in Snelleston, et Willelinus venit et dicut quod Hugo non tenet tenementum illud et ideo ad hoc breve, ut ei videtur, non vult ei respondere. Et Hugo venit et dicit quod ipse est in seisina illius tenementi, ut ille qui est warrantus Margaretę uxoris Rogeri Putrel, cujus dos pars tenementi illius est, ex dono Ricardi fratris ipsius Hugonis, quondam viri ipsius Margaretse, quia tenementum illud fuit jus et hereditas patris ipsius Hugonis et antecessorum suoram, ita quod pater ipsius Hugonis fecit inde homagium Waltero de Mungumeri, avo ipsius Willelmi, et ipsemet Hugo fecit inde homagium Willelmo patri predicti Willelmi. Dicit etiam Hugo quod Ricardus frater suus de alia uxore, duxit in uxorem predictam Margaretam per concessum patris sui, ita quod pater suus dedit eidem Ricardo ad se sustendandum totum predictum tenementum, et ipse dotavit earn de tertia parte illius tenementi . . . . . quod Ricardus obiit prius quam pater suus, et uxor ejus Margareta tenuit se in totum tenementum, et pater ejusdem Hugonis perquisivit breve de . . . . . . . convenitur inter eos quod ipsa haberet in dotem tertiam partem et duas partes tenereb de eo reddendo per annum dimid: marc: ita quod illam dimidiam marcam patri suo reddidit tota vita sua et post . . . . eidem Hugoni qui heres est patris sui, et ideo ipse est in seisina ipsius tenementi, et Willelmus dicit quod tenementum illud debet ad eum revertere pro defectu heredis, sicut illud quod avus suus Walterus dedit in maritagium Radulpho patri ipsius Hugonis cum Letitia sua sorore, ex qua habuit filium, scilicet predictum Ricardum, qui sine herede de corpore suo obiit, et petit magnam assisam domini Regis ut recognoscatur utrum ipse majus jus habeat . . . . . . . . . . . . Dies datus est . . . . . a die Paschee in iij. septimanis apud Westmonasterium . . . . . . Rogerus Putrel et Margareta uxor ejus . . . . . . . (the rest illegible), m. 4, dorso.
  23. "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", Vol 3, Part 1, "Staffordshire Suits - Curia Regis Rolls", entry on page 133/4 reads:
    Headed," Placito apud Portasmuth, coram domino Rege rotulata, in crastino Sanctce Trinitatis, anno septimo regni Regis Johannis" [6th June, 1205].
    Notingham. Loquela inter Hugonem de Akoure et Willelmum de Mungumeri, de audiendo judieio suo de terra, sine die, eo quod Willelmus est in servitio domini Regis cum Comite de Ferrariis, cum equis et armis. Loquela inter eundem Willelmum et Gaufridum de Akoure de audiendo judicio suo de quadam assisa novas dissaisinte, eadem de causa, et quia una loquela pendit ex alia et loquela inter predictum Hugonem et Rogerum Putrel et Margeriam uxorem suam de placito, quod clamat (rest illegible), m. 2, dorso.
  24. "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", Vol 2, Part 1, "Staffordshire Pipe Rolls", entry on page 137/8 reads:
    8 John (1205-1206)
    Nova Oblata
    ... Hugo de Acoura debet x. marc, per sic quod liberi homines eligantur ad faciendam recognitionem inter prędictum Hugonem et Reginaldum Purcel (sic) et Margaret uxorem ejus de ii. carrucatis terree in Swelvestona (sic). ...

    An entry from the Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire Pipe Roll of the same year is also given :
    Hugo de Acoure debet iii. marc, pro habenda recognitione de morte antecessoris de i. carucata terrse et dimid. cum pertinentiis in Fullestona (sic) versus Rogerum Putulf (sic) et Margaretam uxorem ejus;
    A note on page 140 states:
    In Hugh de Okeover's Fine, for "in Fullestona," we should read "in Snellestona;" and for "Rogerum Putulf," we should read "Rogerum Putrell." (See Placita Coram Rege, Easter Term, 7 and 8 John,' No. 29.)
  25. "Curia Regis Rolls of the reigns of Richard I and John - 7-8 JOHN". Entry on p88 reads:
    [1206]
    Derebi.- Dies datus est Gaufrido de Secheshal' et Thome Putrel, attornatis Rogeri Putrel et uxoris sue, et Hugoni de Akovr' de placito assise a die Pentecostes in xv. dies apud Wigorniam.
  26. "Curia Regis Rolls of the reigns of Richard I and John - 7-8 JOHN". Entry on p115 reads:
    [1206]
    Notingham.- Johannes dei gratia etc. justiciariis de banco salutem. Mandamus vobis quod recognitionem mortis antecessoris summonitam coram vobis inter Hugonem de Achovr' petentem et Rogerum Putrell' et Margaretam uxorem suam tenentes de j. earucata et dimidia terre in Snelleston' ponatis coram nobis in proximo adventu nostro in partes de Notingham et Derby : et habeatis ibi hoc breve et aliud breve. Teste S. de Pat' x. die Februarii etc.
  27. "Curia Regis Rolls of the reigns of Richard I and John - 7-8 JOHN". Entry on p200 reads:
    [1206]
    Derby.- Assisa mortis antecessoris inter Hugonem de Akovere petentem et Rogerum Putrell' et Margaretam uxorem ponitur in respectum usque in octabas sancti Michaelis de ij. carucatis terre cum pertinentiis in Snelloston', quia ipsi vocant ad warantum Willelmum de Mungumer'. Habeant eum ad eundem terminum. Et ipsi petunt auxilium curie. Habeant. Idem dies datus est recognitoribus qui venerunt: et ceteri atachientur. Hugo ponit loco suo Gaufridum filium Willelmi
  28. "Extracts from the Pipe Rolls for the Counties of Nottingham and Derby", Yeatman. Entry on p79/81 reads:
    Pipe No 51, r 19 - 7 John
    New Oblations
    ... Hugo de Acour 20s. for having a suit with William de Montgomery concerning Snelleston. ...
  29. "Extracts from the Pipe Rolls for the Counties of Nottingham and Derby", Yeatman. Entry on p83/84 reads:
    Pipe No 52, r 13 - 8 John
    New Oblations
    Hugh de Acover Assize for one carucate of land in Snellston v. Roger Pitcalf and Margt. his wife. ...
  30. "Curia Regis Rolls of the reigns of Richard I and John - 8-10 JOHN". Entry on p2 reads:
    [1207]
    Derby.- Assisa venit recognitura si Ricardus frater Hugonis de Acovre saisitus fuit in dominico suo ut de feodo de j. carucata terre et dimidia in Snelleslund' die qua obiit etc., quam terram Rogerus Putrell' et Margareta uxor ejus tenent, qui vocaverunt ad warantum Willelmum de Mungumeri : qui venit et warantizavit et vocavit ad warantum Walterum de Mungumery; et petit auxilium curie. Habeat. Dies datus est eis in octabis Purificationis coram domino rege : et omnes recognitores atachientur preter Walterum de Fuleford'. Willelmus de Mugumery ponit loco suo Robertum Walensem.
  31. "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", Vol 3, Part 1, "Staffordshire Suits - Curia Regis Rolls", entry on page 14 reads:
    ROLL No. 33. TEMP. JOHN.
    Headed, "Rotulus de termino Sancti Michalis, anno regni Regni J, nono" [29th September, 1207].
    Derebi. Assisa venit recognitura si Ricardus frater Hugonis de Acoure, seisitus fuit in dominico suo et de feodo, de ij. carucatis terrę cum pertinentiis in Snelleslund die quo obiit, etc., quam terram Walterus de Mungumeri tenet, quem Willelmus de Mungumeri vocavit ad warantum.
    Juratores dicunt quod ita obiit Eicardus seisitus, et ideo Walterus in misericordia pro injusta detentione, et Hugo habeat seisinam suam.[1] m. 1, dorso.

    [1] This suit is remarkable, owing to the verdict given upon it, and its bearing upon the history of the common law. The pleadings are to be found page 130, ante. From these it appears that Ralph de Okeover (living temp. H. II.) had married Lettice, the sister of Walter de Montgomery. Ralph obtained with his wife land in Snelston, and had by her a son Richard, who died in the lifetime of his father, without leaving issue. Richard's widow, Margaret, was endowed with one-third of the land, and occupied the remaining two-thirds as tenant of Ralph, paying him an acknowledgment for it of half a mark annually. She afterwards re-married Roger Putrel. Hugh de Okeover, son of Ralph by another wife, claimed the land as heir of his father; and the real point in dispute was whether Ralph succeeded to the property as heir of his son Richard and held it in fee. By the old Saxon law, a father could be heir to his son, but by the common law of England, as it was laid down by the judges subsequent to this date, he was absolutely excluded in the case of real estate. This so called common law, however, was of gradual growth, and the decision in the case now under review was given whilst the traditions of the old Saxon law still lingered in the country, and before the new "dictum" had obtained acceptation. The question has some archęological importance, as the reader will observe on referring to Mr. Eyton's "Domesday of Staffordshire." In page 107 of that work, Mr. Eyton has based his arguments respecting the descent of some of the Verdun estates upon the assumption that a father could not be heir to his-son, and in a case which seems to agree in every particular with that now under notice. Bertram, de Verdun had married Matilda, the daughter of Robert Earl of Ferrars, and had obtained with her four knights' fees. These four knights' fees are afterwards found in the possession of the descendants of Bertram, who had left a widow, Roes, who appears to have been the mother of his surviving children. To get rid of the difficulty, Mr. Eyton supposes that Matilda and Roes are identical, and that Matilda had changed her name to Roes on her marriage. A few instances of such changes of baptismal names are well authenticated; but a more probable solution of the difficulty will be found by assuming that Bertram, like Ralph de Okeover, had had a son by Matilda, who died in the lifetime of his father, and that Bertram had succeeded to the four knights' fees in question as heir to his son, and had transmitted them to his descendants by his second wife. (Editor.)
    A transcript is also given in "Curia Regis Rolls of the reigns of Richard I and John - 8-10 JOHN", on page 41.
  32. "Curia Regis Rolls of the reigns of Richard I and John - 8-10 JOHN". Entry on p151 reads:
    [1208]
    Staff'.- Nigellus de Luvetot per Gaufridum Cardun atornatum suum optulit se iiij. die versus Nicholaum de Verdun, qui se essoniavit de malo lecti versus eum : et Radulfus de Blore Hugo de Acovre Henricus de Deneston' Robertus del Bee, iiij. milites qui debuerunt testificasse visum infirmitatis sue, non venerunt etc. Et ideo attachientur quod sint a die Pasche in tres septimanas etc.
  33. "Okeover of Okeover" archive at Derbyshire Record Office. Item ref D231M/T2, catalogue entry reads:
    [Early 13th C] Covenant between Bartholomew Prior and the convent of Tutbury and Hugh de Acoure [Okeover], in witness of a grant by the Prior and convent to Hugh and his heirs of all their ploughland belonging to their demesne land beyond the bridge inclining in the direction of Acover between the road which leads from Maafelt [Mayfield] to Acover and the Dove, with three other selions contiguous to the above ploughland in the part towards Acover: (in exchange) the said Hugh granted to the Church of the Blessed Mary and the monks who serve there, all his ploughland situated between Snelston mill and the fields of Maafelt [Mayfield] on both sides of the Dove, which he himself retained in his own demesne, out of the land he gave to his brother Geoffrey de Acover in Snelston. Witnesses: William de Ferrars, Earl of Derbyshire, Reginald de Kard, bailiff of the Manor, Stephen, chaplain, John, chaplain, Henry de Braillefort [Brailsford], William de Grindon, Geoffrey de Acover, Nicholas de Cavveland, Robert de Syrefort, Robert de Bec, Robert de Lee, Henry de Daneston, William de Ippestones and many others.
    A full transcript is given in "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", New Series, Vol 7, 1904. "An account of the family of Okeover of Okeover - Okeover Deeds", as deed no 19, on p139-40. An abstract also appears in "Descriptive catalogue of Derbyshire charters", Jeayes, as entry 2125 (where it is dated at 1200-1225). Another complete transcript also appears in the "The Tutbury Cartulary", as entry no 319, which gives the following abstract:
    Exchange of lands between the priory and Hugh de Okeover, in which the Priory give up some of their land between Mayfield and Okeover for some land near Snelston on the other side of the Dove. Warrantey clauses (c. 1210).
    The full transcript reads:
    Hec est conventio facta inter B. Priorem et conventum de Totesbiri ex parte una et Hugonem de Aucoure et heredes suos ex altera videlicet quod predicti Prior et conventus dederunt et in perpetuum possidendam concesserunt predicto Hugoni et heredibus suis totam culturam suam que est de dominico suo ultra pontem pendentem versus Aucoure inter viam que ducit a Maafelt ad Aucoure et Dovuam (sic) cum tribus sellionibus incrementi contiguis predicte culture in partem versus Aucoure. Et predictus H. dedit et in perpetuum possidendam concessit Deo et ecclesie Beate Marie et monachis ibidem Deo servientibus totam culturam suam que est inter molendinum de Syleneston et campos de Maafelt ex utraque, parte Douve quam scilicet ipse retinuit in proprio dominico suo de terra quam dedit Gaufrido fratri suo in Sylenestona, etc Hiis testibus Domino Willelmo Comite Derbie, Raginaldo (sic) de Kard, Dapifero, Stephano capellano, Johanne capellano, Henrico de Braillefort, Willelmo de Grendon, Gaufrido de Aucoure, Nicholao de Cauveland, Roberto de Syrefort, Roberto de Bee, Roberto de Lee, Henrico de Danestofi, Willelmo de Ypestanes et multis aliis.
    (Two seals attached with very indistinct effigies on them; non-armorial.)
  34. "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", Vol 3, Part 1, "Staffordshire Suits - Curia Regis Rolls", entry on page 156 reads:
    ROLL No. 45. TEMP. JOHN.
    Headed, "In octabis Sanctę Trinitatis, anno cciiij." [27th May, 1212].
    Staff. Dies datus est Anselmo de Wasteneis petenti versus Willelmum Griffin et Aliciam uxorem ejus, et Hugonem filium Matilldę, et Willielmum. filium Nicholai, in proximo adventu domini Regis apud Notingham, eo quod unus militum, qui fecerit visum de Alicia et Hugonis et Willielmi, qui essoniaverunt se de malo lecti, nunquam venit vel se essoniavit, scilicet Hugo de Acoure. Idem dies datus est Roberto de Mere, Johanni de Acton, Rogero de Melewiz, et Vicecomes habeat corpus Hugonis. m. 1.

    "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", New Series, Vol 7, gives the following commentary of this on page 14 :
    On the Roll of Trinity term 14 John (1212) there is a note of a suit of Anselm de Wasteneys against William Griffin and Alice his wife and others in which three of the defendants had essoined themselves "de malo lecti" which means that they were too ill to attend, and according to custom, four knights of the county had been told off to report whether this was a valid excuse or not. One of these knights was Hugh de Okeover who had made a view of the parties, but was not present in Court to testify to it, nor had made any excuse for his nonappearance. Another day was given to the parties, and the Sheriff was ordered to arrest the said Hugh.
    A transcript is also given in "Curia Regis Rolls of the reigns of Richard I and John - 11-14 JOHN", on page 293/4.
  35. "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", Vol 3, Part 1, "Staffordshire Suits - Curia Regis Rolls", entry on page 157-8 reads:
    ROLL No. 45. TEMP. JOHN.
    Placita in crastino Sancti Johannis Baptistce [25th June, 1212].
    Staff. Robertus de Mere, Johannes de Acton, Rogerus de Merewich, Hugo de Acoure, milites missi ad videndum utrum infirmitates quibus Alicia uxor Willielmi Griffin, et Hugo filius Matilldse, et Willelmus filius Nicholai essoniavernnt se, de malo lecti versus Anselmum de Wasteneis de placito juris veniunt et dicunt quod languidi sunt, et quod posuerunt diem a sexto die Aprilis in j. annum apud Turrim Londoniensem. Idem dies datus est Willielmo Griffin viro suo ipsius (sic) Alicię, in banco, m. 13, dorso.

    A transcript is also given in "Curia Regis Rolls of the reigns of Richard I and John - 11-14 JOHN", on page 349.
  36. "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", New Series, Vol 7, 1904. "An account of the family of Okeover of Okeover - Okeover Deeds", no 21, on p140-141 reads:
    Carta Johannis de Chandoys et Margerie uxoris eius facta Roberto filio domini Hugonis de Acouere de x solidis annui redditus.
    Sciant presentes et futuri quod ego Johannes de Chandoys et Margeria uxor sua (sic) dedimus concessimus et hac presenti carta nostra confirmavimus Roberto filio domini Hugonis de Acouere in liberum maritagium cum Sarra filia nostra decem solidos annui redditus in villa de Attelowe quos percipere solebamus de predicto Hugone suisque predecessoribus et decem solidos annui redditus de terra Hugonis Besinge in Eginton quicunque earn tenuerit. Tenendum et habendum sibi et heredibus suis de predicta Sarra exeuntibus in feodo et hereditate. Reddendo inde annuatim nobis et heredibus nostris duodecim denarios quod si humanitus ante mortem dicti Hugonis de predicto Roberto contigerit predictus redditus predicto Hugoni omnibus diebus vite sue quiete remanebit qua finita nobis et heredibus nostris absolute reddebit Volumus etiam ut liceat dicto Hugoni pro firma sua predictam terram et heredibus suis distringere cum opus fuerit. Nos enim et heredes nostri predictum redditum predicto Roberto ut predictum est contra omnes homines warantizabimus. Et ut hac donacio concessio et confirmacio rata et stabilis permaneat huic carte sigilla nostra apposuimus. Hiis testibus Domino Rogero de Chandoys Richardo de Draycote Willelmo de Venables, Roberto de Bek, Galfrido de Bek, Magistro Johanna de Weston Willelmo de Bek et aliis.*
    * From the Okeover Chartulary, Bodleian Library, fol 26.
    The first witness, Roger de Chandoys, was the head of the baronial house of Chandos, and was living in 1196. (Liber Rubeus.)

    On page 15 of the same volume, the following commentary is also given:
    "John de Chandoys and Margery his wife granted to Robert the son of Sir Hugh de Acovere in frank marriage with Sarra their daughter, 10s. of annual rent from the manor of Attelowe, which they were accustomed to receive from the said Hugh and his predecessors, and 10s. of annual rent from the land of Hugh Besinge in Eginton. To be held by him and the heirs of the body of the said Sarra, and rendering to them and to their heirs 12d. annually, but the said Hugh was to receive the said rent (of 12d.) for his life, and after his death it was to revert to them and their heirs.
    Margery, who was cograntor in this deed, was the eldest daughter and coheir of Robert fitz Walkeline, who held two knights' fees of the Earls of Ferrers at Radborne, Murcaston, Egginton and Atlow in co. Derby, and it would appear by this deed that the Okeovers had held Atlow of the family of Fitz Walkeline before the date of this marriage. The probability is there had been a previous marriage between the two families, and that Robert de Okeover married a cousin. The first witness to the deed is " Dominus " Roger de Chandoys, the head of the Baronial House of Chandos, who held 13 knights' fees in capite in the cos. of Hereford and Shropshire, and who was probably the brother of John de Chandoys the grantor[2]
    [2] The pedigree of Chandos has not been clearly established, but the head of the house in 1166 was Richard de Chandos, who was succeeded by Robert de Chandos, living 1210, and who was succeeded by Roger, the witness of the above deed. The famous Sir John Chandos descended from the Sir John Chandos of the deed.
  37. "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", Vol 5, Part 1, 1884. "The Burton Chartulary", folio 29, on pages 45-46 reads:
    Quieta clamatio Roberti de Acoure de husbote et haybote in nemoribus de Soberhale et de Bromle et de duabus burgagiis in Burtona.
    Omnibus etc. Robertus de Acoure filius Hugonis de Acoure salutem. Noverit etc. me quietas clamasse omnes demandas pro me et heredibus meis Domino Abbati de Burtona etc. quas ab eis exigebam per breve Domini Regis in Comitatu de Stafford scilicet husbote, haibote in nemoribus eorum de Sobenhale et Bromlega et quieta clamavi duo burgagia quas ab eis exigebam in. villa de Burtona. Pro hac autem clamatione et pro xx. s. quos eis dedi in gersumam concesserunt etc. mini et heredibus meis clausturam ad proprias sepes meas de Stretona et virgam ad Wadluram propriarnm domorum mearum in predicts, villa de Stretona de subbosco nemoris sui de Sobenhale sine contaminatione quercus per visum forestarii extra liberas haias suas. Et ut habeam porcos meos de propria nutritura curias mess de Stretona in bosco de Bromlega extra liberas haias suas quietos tempore pannagii, scilicet a festo Santi Michaelis usque ad festum Sancti Martinii. Et dederunt mihi et heredibus meis unum burgagium in novo vico de Burtona, scilicet inter burgagium coquinarii sui et Radulfi Kidenot. Reddendo eis annuatim vi. d. etc.
  38. In his "An account of the family of Okeover of Okeover", published in "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", New Series, Vol 7, 1904, Wrottesly claims that Hugh's father Ralph may have married a daughter of Robert de Blore, but he offers no source for this claim, simply a few unsupported assertions, which whilst possible, are nothing more than educated guesses until better evidence is found.
    On page 9, discussing Hugh's father Ralph, he simply states: "By a second wife, who seems to have been a daughter of Robert de Blore, he left a son Hugh ... With his second wife, Hugh obtained half a knight's fee in Swinscoe (see p. 17).". On page 15 when discussing Hugh's son Robert, he states: "Robert the son of Hugh de Okeover was probably named after his grandfather, Robert de Blore, of Grindon and Blore". Finally, on pages 16 & 17, (which page 9 led us to believe would offer further details on how Ralph came into possession of Swinscoe via his claimed second wife), whilst discussing Hugh's grandson - also called Hugh, he states: "In 1248, by a fine levied at Lichfield he brought to a close a long standing dispute between him and his neighbour William de Audley, who had married Clemence the heiress of the neighbouring manors of Blore and Grindon. The dispute related to a claim for free chace in the park of Blore, and common of pasture over the unenclosed portion of the same manor. Hugh remitted his claim to both, for which William and Clemence granted to him and his heirs one fat buck and one doe in fawn yearly, and conceded that Hugh and his heirs and their men of Swyneskow might have common of pasture over all the arable land and meadow in Blore, for all manner of cattle after the hay and corn had been carried. William and Clemence also remitted half a mark of the annual rent which they formerly received from Hugh for half a knight's fee which they held in Swyneskow, so that Hugh should not render in future for the said tenement more than 2Os. annually for all services, and they gave to Hugh five marks of money.". His claim on pages 16 & 17 is confirmed by a final concord published in "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", Vol 4, Part 1, 1884. "Calendar of Final Concords", entry on pages 238-9, which reads:
    Date: Lichfield, 3rd February 1248
    Complainant: Hugh de Acovere.
    Tenant or Deforciant: William de Aldedeleye and Clemence his wife.
    Nature of Fine, and Result: Free chase in the park of Blore, and common of pasture in Blore. Hugh remits his claim to both, for which William and. Clemence grant to him and his heirs one fat buck and one doe in fawn yearly, and that Hugh and his heirs and their men of Swyneskow'may have common of pasture over all the arable land and meadows in Blore, for all manner of cattle, after the hay and corn have been carried. And William and Clemence remit half a mark of the annual rent which they formerly received from Hugh for half a Knight's fee, which William and Clemence hold in Swyneskow, so that Hugh shall not render in future for the said tenement more than 20s. annually for all services; and William and Clemence gave to Hugh 5 marks, (indorsed,"the Abbot of Roucestre put in his claim.")

    This however adds nothing to his claim about Ralph coming into possession of Swinscoe upon his second marriage.
  39. In the deed supposedly dated to 1215/16, Alice is named as his sister (40). However it has to be considered that the word may not have been used in the strictest sense, and that she could have been his sister in law. Perhaps she is the same Alice who granted lands in Caldelowe to Hugh in 1203, making her the wife of his otherwise unknown brother Peter (41)(42). On reflection I have ruled this out, as : 1) If that were the case I would expect the lands in Stretton to have been refered to as previously held by his brother, not his siter in law. 2) A cursory study seems to indicate that the Alice who granted the lands in Caldelowe, was actually a daughter of the Noel family of Northamptonshire (See "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", Vol 2, part 1, pages 34, 40, 41, 130 & 134).
  40. "Okeover of Okeover" archive at Derbyshire Record Office. Item ref D231M/T296, catalogue entry reads:
    Gift by Roger, Abbot of Burton, and the whole convent of the same place to Hugh son of Ralph de Acovere [Okeover] and his heirs of six bovates of land in Stretton with all appurtenances which his sister, Alice, held: to be held by Hugh and his heirs at an annual rent of 6s., to be paid in two terms at the Feast of St John the Baptist and the Feast of St Martin Witnesses: Bartholomew, prior of Tutesbir, [Tutbury], Herbert, canon of Lichfield, William de Vernun, Geoffrey de Acovere, Robert de Touke, William Burgemun, Nicholas de Hulton, Ralph de Fel, Thomas Fitton, Ralph de Wicheni, Henry Tison, Robert de Sypele and many others
    "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", New Series, Vol 7, 1904. "An account of the family of Okeover of Okeover - Okeover Deeds", no 16, on p138 gives a full transcript :
    Universis Sancte matris ecclesie filiis ad quos presens scriptum pervenerit Rogerus dei gratia Abbas Burtohie[1] et totus ejusdem loci conventus salutem. Noverit universitas vestra nos unanimi assensu et pari voluntate concessisse et hac presenti carta confirmasse Hugoni filio Radulfi de Aucoure et heredibus suis sex bovatas terre in Streton' cum omnibus pertinentiis. quas Aelicia soror sua tenuit 'in eadem villa de Streton Tenendas et habendas de nobis et successoribus nostris, etc. Reddendo nobis inde annuatim sex solidos, etc Hiis testibus Bartholomeo tune Priore de Tutesbiri Herberto canonico Lichefeldense, Willelmo de Vernun tune Senescallo domini Comitis de Ferariis, Gaufrido de Aucoure, Roberto de Touka, Willelmo Burgeinun, Nicholas de Hulton, Radulfo de Sele, Thoma Fitton, Roberto de Bersicote, Radulfo de Withem(ere) Henrico Tison, Roberto de Sypele et multis aliis.
    [1] This must be the second Roger, who was elected in 1215, and died in the following year.

    I am not as confident as Wottesly here that the deed must date to the time of the second Abbot Roger, and feel unable to rule out the chance that is could alternatively date from the first abbot Roger (1178-82).
    A transcript also appears in "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", Vol 5, Part 1, 1884. "The Burton Chartulary", page 45.
  41. "Descriptive catalogue of Derbyshire charters", Jeayes. Entry 2765, sub Mapleton, reads:
    Fine at Westminster dated 15 days after Easter [21 Apr], 4 John [1203], whereby Peter fil Radulphi and Alice his wife, by William de Dustun her attorney, convey to Hugh de Akovre sixteen bovates of land in the vill of Caldelawe, to hold at a rent of a sparrow hawk or two shillings for all services due to the manor of Wirkewrde. (P.R.O. Hunter's fines, p 25)
  42. "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", Vol 3, Part 1, "Staffordshire Suits - Curia Regis Rolls", entry on page 76 reads:
    Headed, "In xv. dies post Pascham, anno regni Regis Joiiannis iiij." [20th April, 1203].
    Derebi. De Hugone de Achoure dimid: marc: pro licensia concordandi cum Willelmo de Duston, posito loco Petri filii Radulphi et Alicię uxoris suę, de xvi. bovatis terras in Caldelawe, et sciendum quod positus fuit loco eorum coram Domino G. filio Petri. m. 1, dorso.

    A transcript is also given in "Curia Regis Rolls of the reigns of Richard I and John - 3-5 JOHN" on page 194
  43. See Robert's page



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