<< Back to Ahnentafel list

Osbern fitz Richard

circa 1040 - after 1100

Father Richard Scrob
Mother a daughter of Robert the deacon
Wife Nesta verch Gruffyd
Children Hugh, Turstin, Agnes (aka Nesta)


Osbern (or Osbert), was probably born around the early 1040s (1), the son of Richard Scrob (11.a)(12.a)(12.c)(22).

He acquired his first lands in Leintwardine hundred in Shropshire prior to his father's death (and prior to 1066) (11.d)(11.f). He still held this land at the time of Domesday in 1086, along with a lot more besides, much of which had previously been his father's (11)(12)(13)(14)(15)(16)(17)(18), but some of which, having been held by his mother in law in 1066, had probably come to him via his wife (12.o)(15.b).

He married Nesta (7), the daughter of Gruffydd ap Llewellyn (2), and they had two known sons, Hugh (19)(21) and Turstin (21), and a daughter named either Agnes or Nesta (2).

By the middle of William I's reign, around the early 1080s he was seemingly one of the most important men in Worcestershire (9)(10), but after William's death, he opposed William II, and fought for Earl Robert in the rebellion of 1088, when he attacked Worcester (8).

He was still alive in December 1100 (23), but nothing more is known of him.


Brief details of his children:



Sources:

  1. Only a rough estimate, but he was old enough to be holding land in 1066 (hence not born much later than this), yet probably lived to the end of the century, and his son Hugh was living into the 1130s (so he couldn't really have been born too much earlier).
  2. No single piece of evidence has been found to show the marriage between Osbern fitz Richard and Nesta, the daughter of Gruffydd ap Llewellyn. However it can be be demonstrated from an almagamation of evidence thus:
  3. "Cartularum Prioratus S. Johannis Evang. de Brecon", published in Archaeologica Cambrensis, 4th series, Volume XIV, page 141-42 includes an entry in which Bernard Newmarch, with the consent of King Henry, gives to Battle Abbey his church at Brecon dedicated to St John the Evangelist. About 1100. Included in this charter is the phrase "Agnes vero uxor mea me concedente dedit unum manerium quod vocatur Berutona".
    The same charter is also found in Dugdale's "Monasticon", volume 3, page 264, num II, sub Priory of Brecon.
  4. Dugdale's "Monasticon", volume 3, page 244, num VI, sub Battle Abbey, mentions:
    Eo etiam tempore quidam baronum regis, vir magnificus, Bernardus, cognomento de Novo-mercato.... and ... ejusdem Bernardi uxor, Agnes nomine, forte invalitudine tacta, eidem loco ex viri sui assensu de propria hæreditate quandam villulam extra Waliam in Anglia sitam, quæ Berinton vocatur ...
  5. Dugdale's "Monasticon", volume 3, page 263, num I, sub Brecknock Monastery, is an undated history of the early years of the monastery, which begins:
    Le premer conquerur des trey kantrefs de la tere de Brekenoch estoyt Bernard de Nefmarche, Norman, al tens le roy Henry fiz Willame Bastard conquerur, e roy de Engletere. Ceci Bernard de Nefmarche esposa Neste qe fut apele Agnes, la file Griffin le fiz Lewelin, qui ont ets cruel tirant de Gales. E de cele Neste engendra Mael ke pus estoyt noble chivalir. Mes le heritage de Breckenoch en cete manire perdi. Sa mere Neste sus son baron ama un chivaler, e a partir de sa mere le baty et ledement le defola.
  6. "Giraldi Cambrensis Opera", volume 6, pages 28-9, states:
    ... Bernardus de Novo Mecatu nova contra Kambriæ fines conquisitione posedit. Hic filiam Nestæ, filiæ Griffini filii Lewelini, cujus tyrannis totam aliquamdiu Gualliam oppresserat, materno Nestam nomine, quam et Angli vertendo Anneis vocavere, sibi matrimonium copulavit.
  7. "The Cartulary of Worcester Cathederal Priory (Register I)", Darlington, Pipe Roll Society 1962-63, no. 148. The abstract reads:
    Confirmation by Hugh fitz Osbert to the monks of his father's grant of Boraston and the church of Doddderhill to which he adds, for the souls of his father Osbert and his mother Nest, one saltpan at Droitwich worth 20s. Early 12th century.
  8. "The ecclesiastical history of England and Normandy by Orderic Vitalis", translated by Thomas Forester, 1854, page 432 reads:
    "... At the same time Osbern, son of Richard, surnamed Scroop, with Bernard du Neuf Marche his son-in-law, and others in league with them, who held the frontiers of Mercia, made a savage inroad into the territory of Worcester, pillaging and slaughtering the inhabitants, in spite of of the prohibition and excommunication directed against them by the man of God, Wulstan, bishop of Worcester."
  9. "Regesta regum Anglo-Normannorum, 1066-1154", Volume 1, No 230, which is dated between 1079 and 1086, is a :
    "Precept by William I to V[rse] the sheriff and Osbern, son of Escop, and all men French and English in Worcestershire"
    (This also appears in Dugdale's Monasticon, volume 1, page 601, sub Worcester Monastery)
  10. "Regesta regum Anglo-Normannorum, 1066-1154", Volume 1, No 282, which is dated between 1080 and 1087, is a :
    "Notification by William to Bp. Wlfstan and Urse of Abetot and Osbert fitz Richard and all his barons and lieges of Worcestershire"
  11. Domesday Book, Philimore translation, contains the following entries under Shropshire:

      Land of Osbern son of Richard
    1. SHR 5,1
      In `OVERS' Hundred
      Osbern son of Richard holds BURFORD from the King. Richard [Scrope], his father, held it. 6 1/2 hides which pay tax. Land for 29 ploughs. Osbern has 2 mills which pay 12 packloads of corn. 6 slaves, 12 villagers, 3 riders, 24 smallholders, 7 freedmen and a church with 2 priests; between them all they have 23 ploughs. Woodland for fattening 100 pigs; a hedged enclosure. Value before 1066, 100s; now £4.
    2. SHR 5,2
      Osbern also holds TETSTILL. Saeward [* Siward the fat *] held it; he was a free man. 1 hide which pays tax. Land for 3 1/2 ploughs. In lordship 1 plough; 3 slaves; 3 smallholders with 1/2 plough. Woodland for fattening 40 pigs. Value before 1066, 6s; now 10s.
    3. SHR 5,3
      In {CULVESTAN} Hundred
      Osbern also holds ASHFORD [Carbonell]. Lethi held it. 2 hides which pay tax. Land for 4 ploughs. 1 Frenchman and 4 villagers have 2 ploughs. A mill at 3 packloads of corn. Value before 1066, 16s; now 8s; he found it waste.
    4. SHR 5,4
      In LEINTWARDINE Hundred
      Osbern also holds KINSHAM?. He held it himself from King Edward. 5 hides which pay tax. Land for 20 ploughs. 2 men-at-arms have 1 plough in lordship; 5 villagers, 5 smallholders and 1 rider with 3 ploughs. This land was waste and [still] is, except for the lordship, the value of which is 10s.
    5. SHR 5,5
      Osbern also holds STANAGE. 6 hides. Land for 15 ploughs. It was and is waste. 3 hedged enclosures.
    6. SHR 5,6
      Osbern also holds CASCOB. He held it. 1/2 hide. Land for 2 ploughs. It was and is waste. Woodland; a hedged enclosure.
    7. SHR 5,7
      Osbern also holds ACKHILL. Edric held it. 3 hides. Land for 6 ploughs. It was and is waste. Woodland, 1/2 league.
    8. SHR 5,8
      In `CONDITRE' Hundred
      Osbern also holds NEEN [Sollars], and Siward [* the fat *] from him. Siward held it himself; he was a free man. This manor has never been hidated, nor has it paid tax. Land for 5 ploughs. In lordship 1; 10 slaves. A mill which pays a measure of corn. Value before 1066, 40s; now 18s.
  12. Domesday Book, Philimore translation, contains the following entries under Worcestershire:

      Land of the Church of Worcester
    1. WOR 2,14
      Osbern son of Richard holds 1 hide of this manor at COTHERIDGE. He has 1 plough in lordship; 6 villagers and 4 smallholders with 4 ploughs. A mill at 5s. Meadow, 12 acres; woodland, 3 furlongs. Richard [Scrope] held it for the service that the Bishop wished. The value was and is 40s. [Belongs to Wick [Episcopi]]
    2. WOR 2,49
      To this manor belong 90 houses in WORCESTER. The Bishop has 45 of these in lordship; they pay nothing except work in the Bishop's court. Of these, Urso ^[the sheriff]^ holds 24 houses, Osbern son of Richard 8, Walter Ponther 11, Robert the bursar 1. Before 1066 the Bishop had the third penny from the Borough of Worcester; now he has it with the King and the Earl. [Value] then £6; now £8.

    3. Land of Osbern son of Richard
    4. WOR 19,1
      In `DODDINGTREE' Hundred
      Osbern son of Richard Scrope holds BERRINGTON from the King. His father Richard ^[Scrope]^ held it. 2 hides which pay tax. In lordship 2 ploughs; 8 villagers, 4 smallholders, a smith and a miller with 9 ploughs; 1 more plough would be possible. 4 male and 4 female slaves. A mill which pays 22 packloads of corn; meadow, 10 acres; woodland 1 1/2 leagues long and 1 league wide. The value was and is 20s.
    5. WOR 19,2
      Osbern also holds TENBURY [Wells]. His father held it. 3 hides which pay tax. In lordship 1 plough; 14 villagers and smallholders with 12 ploughs; a further 2 more ploughs would be possible. 2 slaves. Woodland 2 leagues long and 1 league wide. The value was 60s; now 40s.
    6. WOR 19,3
      Osbern also holds CLIFTON[-on-Teme]. King Edward held it. 3 hides which pay tax. Robert d'Oilly holds from Osbern. He has 3 ploughs in lordship; 6 villagers, 4 smallholders and 4 ploughmen; between them, with a priest, they have 6 ploughs; a further 5 more ploughs would be possible. Woodland 3 furlongs long and 2 furlongs wide. Value before 1066 and later, 20s; now 40s.
    7. WOR 19,4
      Osbern also holds KYRE. King Edward held it. 3 hides which pay tax. In lordship 1 plough; 5 villagers and 4 smallholders with 8 ploughs. 3 slaves. Value before 1066, later and now, 40s. A mill which pays 10 packloads of grain.
    8. WOR 19,5
      Osbern also holds STANFORD[-on-Teme]. Brictric , a thane of Queen Edith, held it. 1 1/2 hides which pay tax. In lordship 1 plough; 1 villager and 1 smallholder with 1 plough; 1 further plough would be possible. 1 slave. The value was and is 20s.
    9. WOR 19,6
      Osbern also holds SHELSLEY. Sigmund [* the Dane *], a thane of Earl Edwin, held it; he could not withdraw from it without his permission. 1 hide which pays tax. In lordship 1 plough. A reeve with 3 villagers and 2 smallholders have 2 ploughs. 3 slaves. A fishery which pays 16 sticks of eels. 2 more ploughs would be possible. Value before 1066, 40s; now 30s.
    10. WOR 19,7
      Osbern also holds KYRE. His father held it. 1 hide which pays tax. In lordship 1 plough; a second would be possible. 2 smallholders and 1 rider with 1 plough. The value was 15s; now 10s. Herbert holds from Osbern.
    11. WOR 19,8
      Osbern also holds HOMME [Castle]. He held it himself. 1 hide which pays tax. In lordship 1 plough; 7 smallholders with 5 ploughs; 1 more plough would be possible. 4 slaves. A fishery at 2s; a mill which pays 16 packloads of corn. The value was 20s; now 30s.
    12. WOR 19,9
      Osbern also holds [Lower] SAPEY. He held it himself. 3 hides which pay tax. In lordship only 9 cattle. A priest, 9 villagers and 4 smallholders with 11 ploughs; 3 more ploughs would be possible. A mill pays 6 packloads of corn. The value was 45s; now 30s.
    13. WOR 19,10
      Osbern also holds CARTON, and Odo from him. His father held it. 1 hide and 1 virgate which pay tax. In lordship 2 ploughs; 2 villagers and 2 smallholders with 1 1/2 ploughs; 3 more ploughs possible. 7 slaves. Woodland 1/2 league long and 3 furlongs wide. The value was 10s; now 5s.
    14. WOR 19,11
      Osbern also holds EDVIN [Loach]. Wulfheah held it; he could go where he would. Herbert holds from Osbern. 1 hide which pays tax. In lordship 1 plough; 1 villager and 5 smallholders with 3 ploughs. 2 slaves. The value was 20s; now 28s.
    15. WOR 19,12
      [In CLENT Hundred]
      Osbern also holds WYCHBOLD. Earl Godwin held it. [***]. 11 hides. Of these, 4 hides were exempt from tax. In lordship 1 plough; 2 more ploughs would be possible. 19 villagers and 27 smallholders with 18 ploughs. 2 slaves. 5 mills at £4 8s; 26 salt-houses pay £4 12s. 13 burgesses in Droitwich who reap for 2 days in August and March and who serve the court. Woodland, 1 league. Value before 1066 and later £14; now £15.
    16. WOR 19,13
      Osbern also holds ELMBRIDGE. Aldgyth [* wife of Gruffydd *] held it. 8 hides. Of these, 3 hides are exempt from tax, as the County testifies. 8 villagers and 26 smallholders with 10 ploughs; another 10 ploughs would be possible. 1 slave. A salt-house at 4s; meadow, 50 acres; woodland 1 league long and 1/2 wide. Value before 1066, 100s; now 50s.
    17. WOR 19,14
      In `ASH' Hundred
      Osbern also holds CROWLE, and Urso from him. Ketilbert held it; he could go where he would. 5 hides which pay tax. In lordship 1 1/2 ploughs; 3 smallholders and 2 cottagers with 1/2 plough; a further 3 ploughs possible. 3 slaves; 1 burgess at 2s. 2 salt-houses at 6s; woodland 1/2 league for 100 pigs.
  13. Domesday Book, Philimore translation, contains the following entries under Herefordshire:

      Land of Osbern son of Richard
    1. HEF 24,1
      In {HEZETRE} Hundred
      Osbern son of Richard holds MILTON. He held it himself before 1066. 2 hides which pay tax. In lordship 1 plough; 6 villagers with 3 ploughs. 3 slaves and 1 smallholder. Woodland, 4 leagues in both length and width. It was waste. Value now 20s.
    2. HEF 24,2
      Osbern ^[son of Richard]^ also holds BYTON. He held it himself before 1066. 2 hides [***]. In lordship 1/2 plough; 4 villagers and 2 smallholders with 2 ploughs; 2 others would be possible. 1 water-meadow. The value was 12s; now 20s.
    3. HEF 24,3
      Osbern ^[son of Richard]^ also holds and held: BRADLEY at 1 hide; TITLEY at 3 hides; [Little] BRAMPTON at 1 hide; KNILL at 2 hides; [Lower] HARPTON at 1/2 hide; HARPTON at 3 hides; NASH at 1 hide; CLATTERBRUNE at 2 hides; {QUERENTUNE} at 1 hide; DISCOED at 3 hides; CASCOB at 1/2 hide. In these 11 manors is land for 36 ploughs, but it was and is waste. It has never paid tax; it lies in the Welsh March.
    4. HEF 24,4
      Osbern ^[son of Richard]^ also holds and held LYE. 1/2 hide. 1 plough would be possible. 1 villager only. Value 5s.
    5. HEF 24,5
      On these waste lands have grown woods in which this Osbern goes hunting and he has from them what he can catch. Nothing else.
    6. HEF 24,6
      In ELSDON Hundred
      Osbern also holds TITLEY. Earl Harold held it. 3 hides which pay tax. Land for 6 ploughs. It was and is waste. However, there is a hedged enclosure there in a small wood.
    7. HEF 24,7
      In STRETFORD Hundred
      In NEWTON 1/2 hide which pays tax and 1 virgate which does not pay tax. Saeric held it as a manor; he could go where he would. Herbert had it from Richard Scrope. In lordship 3 oxen; 3 villagers and 1 smallholder with 1 plough. The value was 40s; now 24s. 1 plough would be possible there.
    8. HEF 24,8
      In {STEPLESET} Hundred
      [* In {HEZETRE} Hundred *]
      Osbern also holds STAUNTON[-on-Arrow], and Drogo from him. Seisyll held it; he could go where he would. 4 hides which pay tax. In lordship 2 ploughs; 6 villagers and 4 smallholders with 4 ploughs. 4 slaves. It was waste. Value now 60s.
    9. HEF 24,9
      In {TORNELAUS} Hundred
      Osbern also holds and held BODENHAM. 1 1/2 hides which pay tax. In lordship 3 ploughs; 6 villagers, a smith, 2 smallholders, a priest and 1 rider with 8 ploughs between them. Value before 1066, 60s; now 48s.
    10. HEF 24,10
      In `WOLFHAY' Hundred
      Osbern also holds and held WHYLE. 1 hide which pays tax. In lordship 1 1/2 ploughs; 3 smallholders and 2 slaves. The value was 12s; now 8s.
    11. HEF 24,11
      In {CUTESTORNES} Hundred
      Osbern also holds LYDE, and Roger [of] Lacy from him. Seisyll held it. 2 hides which pay tax. In lordship 2 ploughs; 1 villager, a reeve and a smith with 2 ploughs. The value was 25s; now 30s.
    12. HEF 24,12
      [In `WOLFHAY' Hundred]
      Osbern also holds LUDFORD. 1 hide. In lordship 2 ploughs; 5 smallholders with 1 plough. A mill at 6s. Value 20s.
    13. HEF 24,13
      Osbern also has 23 men in [Richards] CASTLE. They pay 10s. Value to him of this castle, 20s.

    14. Land of the King. King William holds it
    15. HEF 1,12
      Osbern son of Richard holds WAPLEY by the King's gift, as he states. He held it himself before 1066. 2 hides which pay tax. 1 riding man, 1 villager and 22 smallholders; between them they have 6 ploughs. Value 20s.
  14. Domesday Book, Philimore translation, contains the following entries under Bedfordshire:

      Land of Osbern son of Richard
    1. BDF 44,1
      In `STODDEN' Hundred
      Osbern son of Richard holds 1/2 hide and 1/2 virgate in EASTON and Hugh Hubold from him. Land for 1 plough; it is there, with 1 slave. Meadow for 1 plough; woodland, 20 pigs. Value 10s; when acquired the same; before 1066, 12s. Stori , Earl Tosti's man, held this land. A Freeman had 1/2 virgate, which he could grant and sell.
    2. BDF 44,2
      In RISELEY Hugh Hubold holds 1/2 hide from Osbern son of Richard. Land for 1/2 plough; it is there, with 1 smallholder. Meadow for 1/2 plough. The value is and was 5s; before 1066, 8s. Alwin, Stori 's man, held this land; he could grant to whom he would.
    3. BDF 44,3
      In KEYSOE Hugh Hubold holds 1 virgate from Osbern. Land for 2 oxen. The value is and was 2s; before 1066, 4s.
    4. BDF 44,4
      ?M? Hugh [* Hubold *] holds `ELVEDON' himself from Osbern. It answers for 1 hide and 1 virgate. Land for 1 1/2 ploughs; they are there. Meadow for 1 plough; woodland, 34 pigs. The value is and was 10s; before 1066, 15s. Alwin, Stori 's man, held this manor; he could grant to whom he would.
  15. Domesday Book, Philimore translation, contains the following entries under Warwickshire:

      Borough of Warwick
    1. WAR B2
      The Bishop of Worcester has 9 messuages; the Bishop of Chester 7; the Abbot of Coventry 36; and 4 are waste, because of the castle site. The Bishop of Coutances has 1 house; the Count of Meulan 12 messuages. Earl Aubrey had 4, which belong to the land which he held; Hugh of Grandmesnil 4, and the monks of Pillerton [Priors] have 1 from him. Henry of Ferrers has 2, Harold ^[son of Earl Ralph]^ 2, Robert of Stafford 6, Roger of Ivry 2, Richard the hunter 1, Ralph of Limésy 9, the Abbot of Malmesbury 1, William Bonvallet 1, William son of Corbucion 2, Geoffrey de Mandeville 1, Geoffrey of la Guerche 1, Gilbert of Ghent 2, Gilbert [of] Bouillé 1, Nicholas the bowman 1, Stephen the steersman 1, Thorkil [* of Warwick *] 4, Harold ^[son of Earl Ralph]^ 2, Osbern son of Richard 1, Christina 1, the nun Leofeva 2. These messuages belong to the lands which these barons hold outside the Borough and are there valued.

    2. Land of Coventry Church
    3. WAR 6,5
      In STONELEIGH Hundred
      The Church itself holds BINLEY. 3 hides. Land for 8 ploughs. In lordship 1 plough; 4 slaves; 10 villagers and 6 smallholders with 5 ploughs. Meadow, 8 acres; woodland 1/2 league long and 1 furlong wide. Value before 1066 and now 60s. Aldgyth, wife of Gruffydd held this land. The Abbot bought it from Osbern son of Richard.

    4. Land of Osbern son of Richard
    5. WAR 37,1
      [In {FERNECUMBE} Hundred]
      Osbern son of Richard holds ASTON [Cantlow] from the King. 5 hides. Land for 10 ploughs. 9 Flemings and 16 villagers with a priest and 10 smallholders who have 12 ploughs. A mill at 8s and 5 sticks of eels; meadow, 40 acres; woodland 1 league in length and width. The value was 100s; now £6. Earl Algar held it.
    6. WAR 37,2
      In PATHLOW Hundred
      Also from Osbern, Urso [* of Abetot *] holds 3 hides in WILMCOTE. Land for 4 ploughs. In lordship 2; 2 slaves; 2 villagers and 2 smallholders with 2 ploughs. Meadow, 24 acres. The value was 30s; now 60s. Leofwin Doda held it freely before 1066.
    7. WAR 37,3
      In MARTON Hundred
      From Osbern William holds 5 hides in DUNCHURCH. Land for 9 ploughs. In lordship 1; 3 slaves. 12 villagers with a priest and 11 smallholders have 5 ploughs. Meadow, 30 acres. The value was and is 100s. Wulfmer held it.
    8. WAR 37,4
      In `TREMLOWE' Hundred
      From Osbern Hugh holds 4 hides in BARFORD. Land for 12 ploughs. In lordship 1; 2 slaves. 2 men-at-arms with a priest, 4 villagers and 11 smallholders have 3 ploughs. A mill at 2s and 13 sticks of eels; meadow, 60 acres. The value was and is 40s.
    9. WAR 37,5
      In {FERNECUMBE} Hundred
      From Osbern Hugh also holds 3 1/2 hides in HILLBOROUGH and in BINTON. Land for 4 ploughs. In lordship 1; 4 slaves; 7 villagers and 2 smallholders with 2 ploughs. A mill at 12d; meadow, 20 acres. The value was and is 40s. Ludric held it freely before 1066.
    10. WAR 37,6
      From Osbern Hugh also holds 3 hides in IPSLEY. Land for 7 ploughs. In lordship 1; 2 slaves; 7 villagers with a priest and 13 smallholders with 4 ploughs. A mill at 16d; woodland 1 league long and 1/2 league wide. The value was 30s; now 40s. Earl Algar held it.
    11. WAR 37,7
      From Osbern Gilbert holds 5 hides in [Temple] GRAFTON. Land for 5 ploughs. In lordship 2; 4 slaves; 6 villagers with a priest and 6 smallholders with 5 ploughs. Meadow, 24 acres. The value was £3; now £4. Merewin, Scroti, Toti and Tosti held it freely before 1066.
    12. WAR 37,8
      In BARCHESTON Hundred
      From Osbern Walter holds 2 hides in STRETTON[-on-Fosse]. He has 1/2 plough in lordship; 2 villagers with 1 plough. The value was 20s; now 30s. Brictric held it freely.
    13. WAR 37,9
      [In {HUNESBERI} Hundred]
      From Osbern William holds MOLLINGTON. 5 hides. Land for 5 ploughs. In lordship 1; 4 villagers with 5 smallholders with 1 plough. Meadow, 20 acres. The value was 40s; now 60s. Leofwin of Nuneham's mother held it freely before 1066.
  16. Domesday Book, Philimore translation, contains the following entries under Staffordshire:

      Land of the clerics of Wolverhampton
    1. STS 7,2
      The Canons themselves hold 2 hides in [Upper] ARLEY. Land for 6 ploughs. In lordship 1 plough; 2 slaves; 7 villagers and 3 smallholders with 4 ploughs; 3 free men. Woodland 6 furlongs long and 4 furlongs wide. To this land belongs 1/2 hide in another ARLEY which Osbern son of Richard has taken away from the Canons ^[of Wolverhampton]^ by force. Land for 1 plough. It is there, with 4 villagers. Value 10s.
  17. Domesday Book, Philimore translation, contains the following entries under Nottinghamshire:

      Land of Osbern son of Richard
    1. NTT 27,1
      [BINGHAM Wapentake]
      In GRANBY Earl Algar had 3 carucates of land taxable. Land for 10 ploughs. Osbern son of Richard has it now. Robert d'Oilly holds from him. He has 4 ploughs; 22 Freemen, 14 villagers and 8 smallholders who have 10 ploughs. A priest and a church; 2 mills, 10s; meadow, 10 acres. Value before 1066 £8; now £15.
    2. NTT 27,2
      In WIVERTON 3 1/2 bovates of land taxable. Land for 1 plough. 7 Freemen have 2 ploughs. A Jurisdiction of Colston [Bassett].
    3. NTT 27,3
      In SALTERFORD 6 bovates of land taxable. [***] It is waste. An outlier of Colston [Bassett]. Pasturable woodland 1 league long and 4 furlongs wide.
  18. Domesday Book, Philimore translation, contains the following entries under Gloucestershire:

      Land of Richard the commissioner
    1. GLS 48,3
      In SALMONSBURY Hundred
      Roger d'Oilly holds NAUNTON from Osbern son of Richard. 5 hides which pay tax. Thorsten held it. In lordship 2 ploughs; 8 villagers with 4 1/2 ploughs. Value £3.
  19. Complete Peerage, Volume 9, page 257, states that Osbern Fitz Richard made a grant of land to Worcester Priory during the time of Henry I, and this was confirmed and added to by his son Hugh. It cites "Registrum Prioratus Beatae Mariae Wigorniensis", fo. 9a, Camden Society, 1865. I haven't been able to confirm this source yet, but it must refer to the same land as the confirmation which was published in Regesta Regum Anglo-Normannorum (20).
  20. Regesta Regum Anglo-Normannorum 1066-1154, Volume 3, page 357, entry 964, sub Worcester Cathedral and See, is a "Confirmation of royal. episcopal, and other charters", which includes: "Concedo et confirmo cartam Osberti filii Ricardi et Hugonis filii ipsius Osberti et Osberti filii ipsius Hugonis de Burastona cum ecclesia de Dyderenhyl et salina in Wich et alia salina viginti solidorum"
    This is dated, by the mention of other people in the (very long) confirmation, as either December 1137-May 1138, or March-June 1139, most likely at the end of April 1139.
  21. Dugdale's "Monasticon", volume 2, page 422, num XIII, sub Pershore Monastery, contains a grant witnessed by :
    Hugone filio Osberni filii Ricardi, et Turstino fratre ejus
  22. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Combined entry for Richard Scrob, and his son Osbern fitz Richard, reads:
          Richard Scrob (fl. 1052-1066), soldier and landowner, was a Frenchman of unknown origins (not for certain a Norman) who came to England in the early years of the reign of Edward the Confessor (r. 1042-66) and was given land on the Welsh border. The twelfth-century chronicler John of Worcester mistook his additional or alternative name Scrob for a patronymic, and Richard has ever since been widely miscalled Richard fitz Scrob.
          Richard married the daughter of another French settler, Robert the Deacon (possibly to be identified with Robert fitz Wimarc); his sons Osbern and William were adults by 1066. Richard's main base was the Herefordshire manor of Auretone, where he built the earthwork of Richard's Castle, one of the handful of pre-conquest castles in England. His lands were concentrated within a few miles, in Worcestershire and Shropshire as well as Herefordshire. Richard was one of the king's housecarls, and was exempted from the expulsions of Frenchmen which followed Earl Godwine's return to power in 1052. In the 1050s and early 1060s he was possibly sheriff of Worcestershire and certainly a man to whom the king entrusted important business there. In 1066 he and his family threw in their lot with the Normans as fighting broke out in Herefordshire between the French and Eadric the Wild. The date of his death is unknown.
          Osbern fitz Richard (fl. c.1066-1088), landowner, Richard's son, owned an estate abutting his father's during the latter's lifetime, including a large tract on the border probably reconquered from the Welsh by Earl Harold in 1063-4. Osbern added greatly to it under Norman rule: by inheritance from his father; by gift from King William, especially in Worcestershire and Warwickshire; by marriage to Nest, daughter of Gruffudd ap Llywelyn and Ealdgyth, Earl Ælfgar of Mercia's daughter, which seems to have brought him five valuable Mercian manors; and by taking manors as a tenant of the bishop of Worcester, the sheriff of Gloucester, and the earl of Shrewsbury. The last connection, with Roger de Montgomery, was perhaps the key to his success: it is striking that an apparently independent and wealthy baron was in 1085 in the earl's household.
          By 1086 Osbern's manors straggled from the Welsh border as far as Worcester and Warwick, with outliers in Nottinghamshire and Bedfordshire; they were worth over £100 a year, more than three times his and his father's combined value in 1066. He was especially important in Worcestershire, where in the 1080s he was a judge alongside the sheriff and Geoffrey, bishop of Coutances, in a case between the bishop of Worcester and Evesham Abbey. He was also a benefactor of Worcester.
          Osbern joined the Welsh marcher rebellion of 1088, but was not one of those whose calculations were complicated by property in Normandy and he was later loyal to William II, his honour of Richard's Castle passing on his death at an unknown date intact to his descendants.
    C. P. Lewis
    Sources
    A. Farley, ed., Domesday Book, 2 vols. (1783) · John of Worcester, Chron. · F. E. Harmer, ed., Anglo-Saxon writs (1952), nos. 50, 116-17 · Reg. RAN, 1.10, 221, 230, 282 · C. P. Lewis, ‘The French in England before the Norman conquest’, Anglo-Norman Studies, 17 (1994), 123-44 · K. L. Maund, ‘The Welsh alliances of Earl Ælfgar of Mercia and his family in the mid-eleventh century’, Anglo-Norman Studies, 11 (1988), 181-90 · V. H. Galbraith, ‘An episcopal land-grant of 1085’, EngHR, 44 (1929), 353-72 · F. Barlow, William Rufus (1983) · F. Barlow, St Wulfstan of Worcester, c.1008-1095 (1990)
  23. "Regesta regum Anglo-Normannorum, 1066-1154", Volume 2, No 500, dated 2 Dec 1100, is a "Notification by Henry I to Gerard the Bp. of Hereford and Hugh de Lasci and all his barons of Herefordshire". The witnesses were Osbern fitz Richard, Richard fitz Pons and Roger de Lisle.
    Note: The index to this volume lists Osbern fitz Richard of Richards Castle as being mentioned in this entry, so the compilers presumably thought that the Osbern fitz Richard named was of Richards Castle. If this is correct then he was alive much later than otherwise thought - for example the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography claims no later mention of him than 1088 (22). However, as his son and heir, Hugh, is not seen prior to 1100, and as there are no other known Osbern fitz Richard's it could refer to (who are likely to have anything to do with the major landowners in Herefordshire), it seems very likely that this witness is the same Osbern, and hence that he survived this late.
    This charter is also given in "Calendar of documents preserved in France illustrative of the history of Great Britain and Ireland - Vol 1 AD 918-1206", entry 402, which dates it as 1 Dec 1100.



Notes:


Home