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Roger la Zouche

died 1238

Father Alan la Zouche
Mother Alice de Belmeis
Wife Margaret
Children Alan, William, Eudo, Lora, Alice


Roger was the son of Alan la Zouche (1) and Alice de Belmeis (2). He had an elder brother William (3)(4)(52), and another brother Philip (who was probably older too) (5)(6).

His father died in 1190 (7), and William inherited the family estate. However William died without issue just a few years later leaving Roger as heir, and in 1199 he was fined £100 for possession of William's lands (3).

Soon after this he was involved in a dispute with Geoffrey de Blie. Geoffrey had presumably been a loyal ally of William - he was a witness to William's confirmation of a family gift to Lilleshall Abbey (6), and William had granted him a sizeable piece of land in Blackfordby, on the written understanding that it would be exchanged for a more suitable choice of land elsewhere later. William having died before the exchange could be made, it seems that the land Roger offered to swap it for was refused (possibly because it was abroad, in Brittany perhaps) and an impasse arose (4). Geoffrey took Roger to court over it, but Roger failed to appear (8). It seems the issue wasn't settled, because Roger was in dispute over the ownership of the same land with William de Blie, Geoffrey's heir, 9 years later (28)(29).

In 1202 he got embroilled in another dispute (11) which dragged on for at least a year (12)(13)(14)(15)(16)(17). He'd inherited this one along with his lands too as Eudo Martel, his opponent, had already made a claim against his brother William ten years earlier (9).

In 1204, the king seized Roger's lands. Orders to sieze lands in Shropshire (18) and Sussex (19) survive, and a survey of the same year descibe the manors of North Molton (20) and Ashby de la Zouch (21) as no longer being his. Excatly what Roger had done to warrant this isn't certain, but it is suggested that he may have fought against the king, alongside his Breton relatives (22). Whatever his crime, he was soon squarely back in the king's favour, as later the same year he fined 100 marks for the return of all his lands (23), and then the following spring the debt for the fine was excused on condition of serving the king in Poitou for a year (24)(25). Then, just a few days later William fitz Warin is made responsible for repaying another 50 mark debt of Roger's to the king (26)(27).

He was in Ireland with the king in 1210 (30), then back in Poitou again in 1213/1214 (34). He continued to hold his lands in North Molton (31)(32) and Tong (33).

His allegiance to the king appears to have grown ever stronger, and King John in return bestowed more lands on him. There was Petersfield and Mapledurham in October 1215 (35) (and one of Roger's knights had his lands restored at the same time (36)). In the November he was granted lands in Shamblehurst and Kidderminster (37), and then the following April came more lands in Fairford (38) and Esseby (39). He was witness to a charter of John's in June 1216 (40), a few months before his death.

The new king, Henry III, continued his father's approval of Roger, and more lands were granted to him. In March 1217, Henry first confirmed the grants of Mapledurham and Petersfield (41)(43), and then a few days later granted him lands in Costessey, Fulbourn & Swavesey "to maintain him in the king's service" (42)(44) - these being the former lands of the Vicomtes of Rohan, his distant cousins. In 1219 he was granted more lands formerly held by them in Hunningham and Eston, lands held by William de Mandeville in Essex (45), Black Torrington and King's Nympton (46), and Bamburc (47).

During this period he was also granted the right to hold fairs and markets in various of his manors, such as in North Molton (48). Black Torrington (49), and Ashby (50)(51).

In 1220, he was granted a license by the king to go on a pilgrimage along St James Way to Santiago de Compostella in Spain. This is also the first time that his wife, Margaret, is found mentioned (84). (It has been suggested that Margaret was the daughter of Henry Biset, but I have yet to confirm or deny this).

In 1225 Roger once more became embroilled in a dispute over lands which he had inherited from his brother William (9). This time it was with the Bagot family over lands in Blimhill and Brinton (53). The dispute was still going on in 1229 (61).

In 1228, he was granted the manors of Kings Nympton and Black Torrington on a somewhat more permanent basis (54), as well as Branton, Karswell (Kingskerswell) and Depeford (55). In the same year he went to Brittany on the king's service (56), and was appointed as sheriff of Devon (57).

The following year he was granted 100 marks in expenses as he was going to be going overseas on the king's service (58), then soon afterwards was commanded to go to Portsmouth and requisition at least 16 ships for the kings service (59)(60). (It is said that Henry assembled one of the biggest armies England had ever seen with the intention to invade France, but that nothing came of it in the end, so I guess Roger may have had to repay his expenses!).

In 1230 he was overseas on the king's service (62)(63)(64)(65). In the same year his lands in Swavesey and Fulbourn were confirmed to him, and it was shown that these not only previously belonged to relations of his from Brittany, but that he gave lands he held there in exchange (66)(67)

In 1232 his (un-named) wife was granted two stags from the forest of Wauberg as a gift from the king (68).

In 1234 he was ordered to provide a knight to aid the Duke of Brittany (69).

In January 1237 he was one of the witnesses to Henry III's confirmation of Magna Carta (70), but was dead within little more than a year from this date (71)(72).

Roger left at least five children, Alan was the eldest son and heir (72). His other two known sons were William (73) and Eudo (aka Eon) (78), and his two known daughters were Lora (80) and Alice (81). It has been suggested that he also had a son Henry, but I am yet to confirm this.


Brief details of his children:



Sources:

  1. No single document has come to light showing Alan as the father of Roger, but the relationship is proven by Roger being shown to be brother (3)(4)(52) of Alan's son William (9).
  2. It's very likely that Alice de Belmeis was Roger's mother, as his father Alan is not known to have had any other wives, and there is nothing to substantively imply that Roger was illegitimate. However it has to be duly noted that both of his brothers were usually referred to as "de Belmeis" after their mother, whilst I have not found a single instance of Roger being refered to in this manner, despite far more references to him surviving. I am thus accepting the relationship as a working hypothesis, but keeping an open mind should further evidence either way come to light.
  3. "Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus in Turri Londinensi asservati, tempore regis Johannis", page 4 .
    See also "The Great Roll of the pipe for the first year of the reign of King John" page 197, which "LOTN" translates this as:
    [Devon] Nova Oblata - Roger de la Zouche owes £100 for having the lands of William [de Belmeis] his brother
  4. "Curia Regis Rolls of the reigns of Richard I and John", page 191, states:
    [1200] Leic' - Rogerus de la Zuch' frater et heres Willelmi de Biaumeis offert Gaufrido de Blie escambium de xiiij. virgatis terre in Blacfordebi, sicut carta Willelmi de Biaumes testatur quod ei debet escambium facere in Anglia: et carta quam Gaufridus profert testatur quod Willelmus predictus concessit ei tenere terram illam hereditarie donee ipso daret in escambium ad valenciam alibi; et ipse obiit et non dedit ei escambium. Dies datus est eis a die sancti Johannis in xv. dies ad audiendum judicium suum.
  5. Dugdale's "Monasticon", volume 6, page 263, num V sub Abbey of Lilleshull, reads:
    Carta Domini Alani la Zuche, de Ecclesia de Esseby, &c.
    Universis sanctae matris ecclesiae filiis, tam praesentibus quam futuris, Alanus la Zouche filius Galfridi vicecomitis, in Domino salutom. Noverit universitas vestra, me dedisse et concessisse canonicis de Lilleshull, pro salute mea, et uxoris meae: Aliciae, et puerorum nostrorum; et pro animabus Philipi de Beumeis senioris, et Philippi junioris et caeterorum filiorum ejus, et omnium antecessorum nostrorum, ecclesiam do Essebi cum Capella de Blackfordeby, et omnibus aliis pertinentiis suis; scilicet in Blackfordby lx acras, in Essebi iii virgatas terram, et quartam extra villam quae fuit Willielmi Forestarii: et terram Haconis sutoris; et totam terram de Suarteclyve quae est inter viam de Pakynton ad Bredonam et divisas per nemus; et tcrmm de Overton; et decimam molendinorum meorum, &c. et totam terram de Lusard quae est inter Watlyngestreet et Merdich, et commoditates nemoris mei de Tong-Castle, &c.

    In his "Antiquities of Shropshire", volume ii, page 211, Eyton offers this precis of the charter:
    This Alan la Zouch describing himself as Son of Geoffrey the Vicomte, and for the health of himself, his wife Alice, and their children (puerorum), and for the souls of Philip de Beumeis senior, Philip junior, and his (Philip senior's) other sons, confirmed and increased the grants above cited to Lilleshall Abbey. His charter specifies the Church of Essebi; the Chapel of Blackfordeby with sixty acres in the latter and three virgates in the former vill; a fourth virgate outside the vill (of Ashby) which was William Forester's; the land of Haco Sutor; all the land of Suartclyve between the road from Pakynton to Bredon and the boundaries through the wood; the land of Overton; tithe of his mills; the land of Lusard; and accomodation in his wood of Tong Castle.*
    * Monasticon, vi, 263, No v, I am favoured by T. Rossell Potter Esq with a transcript of this deed which gives the witnesses. Another transcript is in Dodsworth, vol cxli, fo 49.
    The witnesses seem to have been Roger de Mortimer, Alcher, Richard de London, William Cardiffe, Roger Clerk, Elias Codrell, Robert de Sudenhall (Sydnall), Dame Adheliza de Belmes, William de Belmes her son, Philip de Belmes his brother, and Robert de Horseley.
    I suppose this deed to have passed between 1185 and 1190.

    Nichol also gives a transcript in his "History and Antiquities of the county of Leicester", Volume 3, part 2, page 562. His witnesses are slightly different and show Philip as Peter. However this is almost certainly wrong as no other reference to a Peter has been found, and Philip was a Belmeis family name :
    Rogero de Mortemeir, Alchero, Ricardo de Lundonia, Willielmo Cardiffe, Rogero clerico, Elia Codrel, Roberto de Sudenhall, domina Adelizia de Belmez, Willielmo de Belmeis filio ejus, & Petro fratre ejus, Roberto de Horseleya, & multis aliis
  6. In his "Antiquities of Shropshire", volume ii, page 212, Eyton mentions a grant from William la Belmeys, son of Alan la Zouch, confirming his ancestor's grant to Lilleshall Abbey :
    [William's] confirmation to Lilleshall Abbey is well worth notice. Therin he styles himself "William de Belmeys son of Alan la Zouch". He also makes mention of "Adheliza de Belmeys his Mother" and of "Philip de Belmeys Senior, Philip Junior and Ranulph Brother of Philip Junior" as his (William's) Antecestors*.
    * Transcript communicated by T. Rossell Potter Esq.
    The witnesses are Philip de Belmeys (probably William's Brother), Geoffrey de Blie, Ivo Brito de Seun, Roger Clerk, Roger de Flamvill, Master Robert de Willesburgh, Robert Chaplain, Thomas and Ranulph Priests, Henry Parson of Hartishorn, Ralph his Brother, Simon Nephew of Abbot William, Radulf Caudrell, Hugh Trullemag.
    This deed had a Seal two inches wide, exhibiting the figure of a Knight on horseback brandishing a Sword. The shield on his left arm was charged with a Fesse, and circumscribed thus,-
    SIGIL' WILLIELMI DE BELMES FILIVS (sic) ALANI LA ZVCH.

    Fortunately Nichol gives a full transcript in his "History and Antiquities of the county of Leicester", Volume 3, part 2, on page 562:
    "Universis ecclesie filiis Willielmus de Belmeys, filius Alani la Zouch, salutem. Noverit universitas vestra me dediffe, &c. canonicis de Lillishull, pro salute mea, & anima patris mei Alani la Zouch & matris mee Adhelize de Belmeys, & pro animabus Philippi de Belmeys senioris & Philippi junioris, & Ranulphi fratris sui, & omnium antecestorum, &c. ecclesiam de Esseby, cum capella de Blackfordby, LX acras terre in Esseby, & 3 virgatas terre, & quartam extra viliam que suit Willieimi Forestarii, liberam & quietam de hidagio, de danegeld, de scutagio, de relevamine, de stretward, de moteseig', de murdro, de arcturis, & omnibus aliis exactionibus & serviciis, &c. in bosco, in plano, &c. Hiis testibus; Philippo de Belmeys, Galfrido de Blie, Ivone Britone de Scun', Rogero clerico, Rogero de Flamville, magistro Roberto de Wellesburgh, Roberto capellano, Thoima & Radulfo presbyteris, Henrico persona de Hartishorn, Radulpho fratre ejus, Simone nepote abbatis Willielmi, Radulfo Caudrell, Hugone Trullemag."
    Sealed with a seal about two inches broad; himself on horseback, brandishing his sword; on his left arm a long shield, charged with a fess, circumscribed, " SIGIL. WILLIELMI DE BELMES, FILIUS ALANI LA ZUCH"
  7. "Complete Peerage", volume XII, part II, page 930, cites Pipe Roll, 2 Ric I, p130, as evidence of Alan's death in 1190. I haven't been able to confirm this yet.
  8. "Curia Regis Rolls of the reigns of Richard I and John", page 236, states:
    [1200] Leic' - Gaufridus de Blie optulit se iiij. die versus Rogerum le Zuch' de placito audiendi judicium suum de placito xiiij. virgaterum terre cum pertinenciis in Bladefordebi[/Blacfordebi]: et ipse non venit vel ee essoniavit, et fuit petens. Ideo consideratum est quod ipse recedat sine die.
  9. "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", Vol 2, Part 1, "The Staffordshire Pipe Rolls - Roll of 5 Richard I (1192-1193)". An entry on page 27 reads:
    Extract from the Warwickshire and Leicestershire Pipe-Roll of 5 Ric I
    Hugh, Bishop of Coventry, Sheriff, Gilbert de Segrave and Reginald Basset acting, for him.
    De. oblatis curies in Legrecestrescira.
    Eudo Martel debet lx. marc, pro habenda rationabili parte sua quae eum contingit de hereditate matris suae versus Willelmum de Belmes filium Alani de la Zuche.

    A comentary on the roll, on page 29, says:
    Eudo Martel's Fine was evidently in contemplation of a large aggrandisement. Instalments of the said Fine were paid in 6, 7, and 8 Ric. 1., the last completing the required sum. The Defendant, William de Belmeis, better known as William la Zouche, was the eldest of three sons of Alan la Zouche, by Adelicia, hitherto (see Antiquities of Shropshire II. 208) supposed to have been sole heir of the Barons Belmeis, of Tong (Shropshire), who were, also Mesne-Lords of Blymhill, Brinton, and Wilbrighton (Staffordshire), (see Staffordshire Collections 1.176.)
    William la Zouche had hereditaments' in many other counties; for instance, in Devon, Sussex, Cambridgeshire, and Leicestershire, where his name is still remembered in Ashby-de-la-Zouche. On what estates and on what facts Eudo Martel's claim was founded I have no evidence. Possibly the mothers of the two present litigants were sisters. If ,so, Adelicia de Belmeis was not the sole heiress of the Belmeis Barons..
    Another possible hint towards the solution of this genealogical enigma may exist in the appearance that Anno Domini, 1166, Ranulf de Belmeis, of Tong, and Geoffrey Martel each had a mesne interest in the Staffordshire manor of Wilbrighton. (See the argument on this point, Staffordshire Collections I. 169. (10))
  10. "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", Vol 1, Part 1, "The Liber Niger Scaccarii - Barony of Robert de Stafford". An entry on page 169 reads:
    GALFRIDUS MARTEL, 1 f.m. et de ipso.
    Herveius de Duncheswrthe - South Denchwortb in Berkshire.

    A comentary on the entry says:
    The Berkshire Domesday states that Robert de Stafford holds Denchesworde, and that Lawrence holds it of Robert.
    The Testa de Nevill states that Elias de Bagenore and Hervey de Wilbricton hold half a Knight's fee in Suthdenesworth of the Barony of Stafford.
    Lawrence, the Domesday tenant of Robert at Denchworth, is also Robert's tenant at Willbrighton in Staffordshire, but the latter fee is included in the tenure of Ralph de Belmeis further on. By a deed in the Salop Chartulary circa 1220, Henricus (for which read Herveius) de Stafford remits to William de Wilbrichton his relief for one Knight's fee, formerly held by "William's father in Dencheswrth. There can hardly be a doubt but that Hervey de Denchworth, and the Hervey de Wilbriton named under the fief of Ralph de Belmeis, are identical, and it illustrates how little attention was paid to surnames at this period, when the same person is returned in the same Record under two different names.

    The tenure of Ralph de Belmeis which was mentioned appears on page 176, where the entry reads:
    RADULFUS DE BELMEIS, 3 f.m, scilicet.
    Johannes Bigod (read Bagot), 2 f.m. . Blymhill and Brinton
    Herveieus de Wilbrichton, 1 f.m. . . . Wilbrighton.
    The commentary on this entry says:
    The Staffordshire Domesday names Wilbreston, Brunitone, and Brumhelle amongst Robert de Stafford's lands, the first held by Laurence, and the two last by Warine.
    The mesne tenure of Ralph de Belmeis passed to his heir Roger la Zuche, and in 9 H. 3, Roger sued, "Coram Rege" Hervey Bagot to answer why he distrained upon the fee of the said Roger, in Blumenhill and Bromton, when Roger had performed all service due for it, whereby Margaret Bagot, who holds the fee of Roger, was damaged to the extent of 10 marcs. Hervey admitted the distress, but stated it was levied for the reliefs which Roger owed to him after the deaths, respectively of Roger's father and brother. Roger denied he owed anything, and stated his father had performed homage, and paid his relief to the father of Hervey, and after the death of his brother, Roger had done homage to the father of Hervey, and afterwards to Millicent, the mother of Hervey, and lastly to Hervey himself. As Hervey could not deny these facts, a verdict is given for Roger la Zuche.
    The Testa de Nevill, tem. H. 3, states that the heirs of John Bagod hold 2 Knight's fees in Blumhill and Brinton, and that Hervey de Wilbriton holds 1 Knight's fee in Wilbriton.
  11. "Curia Regis Rolls, volume 2, 3-5 John", page 103, states:
    [1202] Susex' - Dies datus est Eudoni Martell' et Rogero de la Suche de placito tene in octabis sancti Hillarii.
  12. "Curia Regis Rolls, volume 2, 3-5 John", page 139, states:
    [1203] Leic' - Loquela que est [inter] Eudonem Martell' et Rogerum de la Suche ponitur in respectum usque in octabas Purificacionis sancte Marie per mandatum G. filii Petri per Gocelinum Marescallum missum.
  13. "Curia Regis Rolls, volume 2, 3-5 John", page 175, states:
    [1203] Sussex' - Loquela inter Rogerum de Lazuch' et Eudonem Martel ponitur in respectum usque in j. mensem post [Pascha per] preceptum justiciarii, per Jocelinum Marescallum. Et sciendum est quod nullus comparuit in curia.
  14. "Curia Regis Rolls, volume 2, 3-5 John", page 186, states:
    [1203] Sussex' - Loquela inter Rogerum de Lazuche ot Eudonem Martel do placito terre ponitur in respectum usquo a die Pasche in xv. dies.
  15. "Curia Regis Rolls, volume 2, 3-5 John", page 200, states:
    [1203] Susex' et Leic' - Dies datus est Eudoni Martell' et Rogero de la Zuche ad capiendum cirographum suum in xv. dies post festum sancte Trinitatis.
  16. "Curia Regis Rolls, volume 2, 3-5 John", page 269, states:
    [1203] Sussex' - [Dies dates est Rogero] la Zuche et Eudoni Martel ad capiendum cirographum suum in octabis sancti Michaelis. [Eudo ponit loco suo Hugonem] de Brionnes : et Rogerus ponit inde loco suo Alanum de Wolbeding'.
  17. "Curia Regis Rolls, volume 3, 5-7 John", page 9, states:
    [1203] Staff' - Eudo Martell' optulit se iiij. die versus Rogerum la Zuche ad recipiendum cirographum suum: et ipse non venit vel se essoniavit, et habuit diem in banco. Unde atachietur quod sit a die Pasche in xv. dies recepturus cirographum suum et ostensurus etc.'.
    A transcript is also given in "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", Vol 3, Part 1, "Staffordshire Suits - Curia Regis Rolls", page 78/9, which gives the exact date. It reads:
    Headed, "Placita in octavis Sancti Michalis, anno regni Regis Johannis quinto" [6th October, 1203].
    Staff. Eudo Martel optulit se iiij. dies versus Rogerum La Zuche ad recipiendum cirographum suum, et ipse non venit vel se essoniavit, et habuit diem in banco, unde atachietur, quod sit a die Paschia in xv. dies
    [9th May, 1204] recepturus cirographum suum et est, etc.
  18. "Rotuli Litterarum Clausarum in Turri Londinensi Asservati", Volume 1, page 1 which "LOTN" translates this as:
    14/6/1204: Order to the sheriff of Shropshire to deliver to William de Braose seisin of the lands that Roger de la Zouche formerly held of the fee of the said William in your balliwick.
  19. "Rotuli Litterarum Clausarum in Turri Londinensi Asservati", Volume 1, page 4 which "LOTN" translates this as:
    15/8/1204 Order to the bailiff of Sussex to deliver to William Briwerre all the lands that Roger de la Zouche held of the honour of Petworth, of which Briwerre has the keeping. Extend the land and inform the king as Briwerre is to answer therefor at the Exchequer.
  20. "Rotuli Normanniae in Turri Londinensi Asservati", page 130 which "LOTN" translates this as:
    Valuation of North Molton, late of Roger la Zouche.
  21. "Rotuli Normanniae in Turri Londinensi Asservati", page 139 which "LOTN" translates this as:
    Valuation of Ashby-de-la-Zouche, late of Roger la Zouche.
  22. In his "Antiquities of Shropshire", volume ii, page 212/3, Eyton hypothesises thus:
    "At the Salop Assizes of 1203, Roger la Zuche essoigned his attendance, his excuse being that he had gone beyond sea before the general summons had issued.
    Herewith are connected some matters of contemporary History.- King John is said to have assassinated Arthur Earl of Brittany, the son of Geoffrey and Constance before mentioned, on Thursday April 3, 1203. The King was certainly at Rouen on that and three following days (Good Friday and Easter Sunday were two of them), and Arthur was never seen afterwards. When this crime was rumoured in Brittany, the Bretons determined to avenge it. They joined with Philip Augustus in that united attack on John’s territory which ended in the loss of Normandy. Roger la Zouche was a Breton by descent, as we have seen already. We now see why the Lord of Tong was not in attendance on the King’s Justices when summoned to Salop in October 1203.
    Roger la Zouche’s foreign sympathies involved the forfeiture of all his English possessions."
  23. "Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus in Turri Londinensi asservati, tempore regis Johannis", page 221.
  24. "Rotuli Litterarum Clausarum in Turri Londinensi Asservati", Volume 1, page 28 which "LOTN" translates this as:
    25/4/1205 The king has pardoned Roger de la Zouche the fine of 100m that Roger made for the restoration of his lands, of which he was disseised while he was in Brittany, so that Roger and one knight will remain in the service of Geoffrey the king's son in Poitou for one year. Order to the barons of the Exchequer to acquit Roger of the debt.
  25. "Rotuli Litterarum Patentium in Turri Londinensi Asservati", page 53 which "LOTN" translates this as:
    26/4/1205 Roger de la Zouche is in Poitou in the king's service with Geoffrey fitz Regis, and his lands are to be kept and defended against all men as if they were the king's own demesne, and no injury or fdamage is to be permitted. Also Roger is to be quit of suits to shire and hundred courts, and aid to the sheriff and his bailiffs, and all pleas and appeals etc.
  26. "Rotuli de Oblatis et Finibus in Turri Londinensi asservati, tempore regis Johannis", page 266.
  27. "Rotuli Litterarum Clausarum in Turri Londinensi Asservati", Volume 1, page 30 which "LOTN" translates this as:
    1/5/1205 William fitzWarin owes the king 50m, to be paid half at St John and half at Peter's Chains, on behalf of Roger de la Zouche, to whom the king had lent that sum. Order to the sheriff of Devon that William is not to be impleaded re his free tenement of Brightley within the said terms, and distrain William to pay the said debt within the terms.
  28. "Curia Regis Rolls", Volume 2, 8-10 John, page 325, states:
    [1209] Leic' - Rogerus la Zuche ponit loco suo Gilbertum Plantefolie versus Willelmum de Blie de placito assise etc. Et postea venit et amovet eum, et vult prosequi in propria persona.
  29. "Curia Regis Rolls", Volume 2, 8-10 John, page 327, states:
    [1209] Leic' - Assisa mortis antecessoris inter Willelmum de Blie petentem et Rogerum la Zuche tenentem de xiiij. bovatis tene cum pertinenciis in Blacfordebi ponitur in respectum coram domino rege in crastino sancte Trinitatis, quia predictus Rogerus dixit quod nullum placitum debet teneri apud Westmonasterium; et inde vocavit dominum regem ad warantum. Habeat etc. Idem dies datus est omnibus recognitoribus qui venerunt etc.
  30. "Rotuli de liberate ac de misis et praestitis, regnante Johanne", page 182.
  31. "The Red Book of the Exchequer, Volume 2", page 559, includes:
    [1210-1212] DEVONESIRA
    TERRA NORMANNORUM ET ALIORUM QUORUM SERVITIA IGNORANTUR.
    Rogerus la Zuche, Normonitone; nescitur per quod servitium.
  32. "The Book of Fees commonly called Testa de Nevill, Part 1: 1198-1242", page 99, includes:
    Rogerus la Zuche tenet manerium de Normout' cum pertinentiis in capite de domino rege, set . . scitur per quod servicium de dono Henrici Regis primi antecessoribus suis.
  33. "The Book of Fees commonly called Testa de Nevill, Part 1: 1198-1242", page 147 which "LOTN" translates as:
    1212. Roger la Zouche holds the manor of Tong, formerly of the fee of William de Braose, by half of one fee.
  34. "Rotuli Litterarum Clausarum in Turri Londinensi Asservati", Vol 1, page 166 which "LOTN" translates this as:
    23/5/1213-7/5/1214 A list of names written on the dorse of the roll. Probably connected to the Poitou campaign of 1214 since it refers to Robert de Marmion junior crossing over on behalf of his father and to Roger de St-John sending a knight.
  35. "Rotuli Litterarum Clausarum in Turri Londinensi Asservati", Volume 1, page 231 which "LOTN" translates this as:
    14/10/1215 The king has granted to Roger de la Zouche the manors of Petersfield and Mapledurham, late of Geoffrey de Mandeville. Order to William Briwerre to deliver seisin of the manors with the chattels.
  36. "Rotuli Litterarum Clausarum in Turri Londinensi Asservati", Volume 1, page 231 which "LOTN" translates this as:
    14/10/1215 Humphrey de Scoville, knight of Roger de la Zouche, has letters close of protection addressed to Geoffrey de Neville, chamberlain, and Thomas de Sandford, ordering them to restore to him what they took from his land in Helprinton .
  37. "Rotuli Litterarum Clausarum in Turri Londinensi Asservati", Volume 1, page 237 which "LOTN" translates this as:
    18/11/1215 Order to the sheriff of Hampshire to deliver to Roger de la Zouche the land late of Henry Biset in Shamblehurst [in South Stoneham], which was in the hands of William de Huntingfield, and which the king committed to Roger to keep during pleasure. The same to the sheriff of Berkshire re the land late of Henry in Kidderminster.
  38. "Rotuli Litterarum Clausarum in Turri Londinensi Asservati", Volume 1, page 266 which "LOTN" translates this as:
    25/4/1216 Order to the sheriff of Gloucestershire to deliver to Roger de la Zouche full seisin of Fairford, which is of the honour of the earl of Gloucester.
  39. "Rotuli Litterarum Clausarum in Turri Londinensi Asservati", Volume 1, page 266 which "LOTN" translates this as:
    25/4/1216 Order to the sheriff of Northamptonshire to deliver to Roger de la Zouche full seisin of one-half fee in Esseby, which Roger de Thorpe, who is with the king's enemies, formerly held of Roger.
  40. "Rotuli Chartarum in Turri Londinensi", page 222.
  41. "Calendar of the Patent Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office, Henry III, 1216-1225", page 37, states:
    [1217] De concessione terrarum. - Rex militibus, libere tenentibus et aliis de maneriis de Mapeldureham et Petrefeld, salutem. Sciatis quod concessimus dilecto et fideli nostro Rogero la Szuche maneria de Mapeldereham, et Petrefeld, cum omnibus pertinenciis, sicut dominus J. rex, pater noster, bone memorie quondam rex Anglie, ilia ei concesserat, habenda quamdiu nobis placuerit, salva Milesentie, que fuit uxor comitis Ebroici, racionabili dote sua. Et ideo vobis mandamus quod eidem Rogero in omnibus sitis intendentes et respondentes. Et in hujus rei testimonium has litteras etc. vobis inde mittimus. Teste eodem comite, apud Wintoniam, xiiij die Marcii, anno eodem.
  42. "Calendar of the Patent Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office, Henry III, 1216-1225", page 64/65, states:
    [1217] He manerio commissi. Rex vicecomiti Norfolchie, salutem. Sciatis quod commisimus dilecto et fideli nostro, Rogero la Zuche, Costeseye cum pertinenciis, que fuit vicecomitis de Rohan, habendam quamdiu nobis placuerit. Et ideo tibi precipimus quod ei inde sine dilacione plenam saisinam habere facias. Et quia nondum habuimus sigillum, has literas nostras, sigillo comitis W. Marescalli, eidem Rogero fieri fecimus in testimonium. Teste comite, apud (sic), ut proximo supra.
    Eodem modo scribitur vicecomiti Cantebrigie pro eodem Rogero de terra de Fuleburn, et de Swavesye, que fuerunt predicti vicecomitis de Rohan. Teste eodem, ibidem, anno eodem
  43. "Calendar of the Patent Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office, Henry III, 1216-1225", page 68, states:
    Mandatum est hominibus de Petrefeld et de Mapeldureham quod sint intendentes et respondentes Rogero la Zuche, cui dominus rex maneria ilia de Petrefeld et de Mapeldureham commisit, habenda quamdin ei placuerit. Teste comite, apud Certesye, xi die Junii, anno regni domini regis primo. Per dominum Wintoniensem episcopum.
  44. "Calendar of the Patent Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office, Henry III, 1216-1225", page 87, states:
    [1217] Rex Falkesio de Breaute, salutem. Sciatis quod concessimus dilecto et fideli nostro, Rogero la Zuche, maneria de Fuleburn [et] Suaves [eye], cum pertinenciis, que fuerunt G. vicecomitis Rothomagensis, in exscambium terre sue de Britannia, quamdiu nobis placuerit, et ideo vobis mandamus quod eidem Rogero sine dilacione plenam saisinam inde habere faciatis, cum pertinenciis. Et in hujus rei testimonium, has literas nostras patentes etc. Teste ut proximo supra. Anno eodem.
  45. "Memoires pour servir de preuves - Histoire ecclesiastique et civile de Bretagne", Morice, Book 1, col 836 gives extracts from the Close rolls thus:
    Rot. Claus. anno tertio Henrici III mense duodecimo, Rex Vicecomiti Norfolc & Suffolc salutem. Praecipimus tibi, sicut aliis praecipimus, quod sine dilatione plenam sesinam habere facias Rogero la Zouche de villa de Hunningham & de villa de Eston, que fuerunt Vicecomitis de Rohan, nisi illae villae sint pertinentes ad honorem de Eye. Teste decimo die Januarii.
    Rot. Claus. anno quarto Henrici III mense septimo. Rex Vicecomiti Norfolk & Suffolc salutem. Sciatis quod concessimus Rogero la Zouch ad se sustentandum in servitio nostro, quandiu nobis placuerit, terram, quam Guillelmus de Mandeville Essexiae Comes habuit de Bailliva nosta de Bambure, de terra quae suit Vicecomitis de Rohan. Datum Cantuariae die nona Julii.
  46. In his "Antiquities of Shropshire", volume ii, page 216, Eyton cites "Claus. i, pp. 366, 386", (presumably "Rotuli Litterarum Clausarum in Turri Londinensi Asservati", but I haven't yet confirmed this) and states
    "... on January 22, 1219, the Sheriff of Devonshire is ordered to give up to him for his maintenance, and during the King's pleasure, lands in Blaketorinton and Nymed, which had once been Joel de Maine's The grant is expressed to be in recompense of lands which Roger had lost in Brittany, in the King's service."
  47. In his "Antiquities of Shropshire", volume ii, page 216, Eyton cites "Claus. i, pp. 391, 423", (presumably "Rotuli Litterarum Clausarum in Turri Londinensi Asservati", but I haven't yet confirmed this) and states
    "... on July 9, the Sheriff of Norfolk is to give him certain lands in Bamburc, to hold during the King's pleasure, ahich lands had once belonged to the Vicomte of Roain, but had since been held of the King's Bailiwick by William de Mandeville, Earl of Essex."
  48. In his "Antiquities of Shropshire", volume ii, page 216, Eyton cites "Claus. i, pp. 366, 386", (presumably "Rotuli Litterarum Clausarum in Turri Londinensi Asservati", but I haven't yet confirmed this) and states
    "... on July 28, 1218 Roger la Zouche had license to hold an annual fair at his Devonshire Manor of Northmolton"
  49. In his "Antiquities of Shropshire", volume ii, page 216, Eyton cites "Claus. i, pp. 391, 423", (presumably "Rotuli Litterarum Clausarum in Turri Londinensi Asservati", but I haven't yet confirmed this) and states
    "On May 1, 1219, he has a grant of Fair and Market at Blactorinton"
  50. "Calendar of the Fine Rolls of the Reign of Henry III", 3 H3, 375 reads :
    [22 Aug 1219] Leicestershire. Roger la Zouche gives the king a palfrey for having an annual fair at his manor of Ashby on the eve and feast of St. Helen, and for having a weekly market there on Wednesdays, unless that fair and the aforesaid market are to the damage etc. Order to the sheriff of Leicestershire to take security etc
  51. "Calendar of the Fine Rolls of the Reign of Henry III", 3 H3, 429 reads :
    [21 Oct 1219] Westminster. Leicestershire. Order to the sheriff of Leicestershire that the market which the king had previously granted to Roger la Zouche, to be held each week on Wednesdays at his manor of Ashby, is to be held there on Tuesdays, and that the annual fair that he had granted to be held on the eve and feast of St. Helen is to be held there on the eve and feast of the Exultation of the Holy Cross, unless that market or fair are etc., saving the fine of one palfrey which he made with the king for the first grant , because Roger has given the king’s council to understand that the first grant was to the damage etc. Witness H. de Burgh.
  52. "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", Vol 4, Part 1, "Plea Rolls of Henry III - Hillary 7 H III". An entry on page 25 reads:
    Salop. Roger de la Zuche sued the Abbot of Shrewsbury for the advowson of the Church of Twange (Tong), of which his ancestor Philip de Beumes was seised as of fee in the reign of King Henry, who was grandfather of the King's grandfather, and who had presented one Richard Bachun to it; and from Philip the right descended to Philip de Beaumes as his son and heir; and from Philip to Ralph, brother and heir, because Philip died without issue; and from Ralph to Alice, his sister; and from Alice to William de la Zuche, as son; and from William to Roger, as brother and heir. The Abbot appealed to a great assize, m. 15, dorso
  53. "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", Vol 1, Part 1, "Manor and Parish of Blymhill", page 292/3 reads:
    In 1225 Hervey Bagot is summoned to answer to Roger la Souch why he distrained upon the fee of the said Roger in Blimhill and Brinton, when Roger had performed all services due for it ; whereby Margaret Bagot, who holds the fee of Roger, is damaged to the extent of 10 marks. Hervey appeared and admitted the distress, and stated it had been levied for the reliefs which Roger owed to him after the deaths of his father and brother. Roger denied that he owed anything, and stated that his father had been dead forty years, and after his death his brother had performed homage and paid his relief to the father of Hervey, and, after the death of his brother, Roger had done homage to the father of Hervey, and he had afterwards done homage to M. the mother of Hervey, and afterwards to Hervey himself. As Hervey could not deny the above facts a verdict is returned for Roger 3.
    I suppose the defendant in this suit to have been Hervey Bagot Baron of Stafford, the son and successor of Hervey Bagot and his, wife Melisent de Stafford, the daughter and heiress of Robert de Stafford, and therefore chief lord of the fee. In this case the Chief Lord appears to have unduly distrained upon the lands of Margaret Bagot, the tenant in fee, who thereupon called the mesne Lord, Roger la Zouche, to warranty.
    This Roger was the son of Alan la Zouche and Alice, the sister and heiress of Ranulph de Belmeis, which Roger succeeded to the inheritance on the death of his elder brother William in 1199. In 1229 we find Margery Bagot suing the same Roger la Zouche under writ of novel disseizin for her free tenement in Blymhill 1. This is the last I hear of the rights of these mesne Lords in Blymhill.

    3 Coram Rege Rolls, Mich. Term, 9 Hen. III.
    1 Rot. Pat. 14 Hen. III., dorso
  54. "Calendar of the Charter Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office, Vol I, 1226-1257", page 66, includes:
    [1228] Jan 4. Grant to Roger la Zouche, and his heirs, of land in Nimeton and Blakethorenton, late of Joel del Meyne, previously held by the said Roger of the king's bail, to hold the same freely as the said Joel held it, until the king shall restore it to the heirs of the said Joel of his free will or by a peace, when the king will make a reasonable exchange in wards or escheats to the value of the said land.
  55. "Close Rolls of the reign of Henry III, preserved in the Public Record Office, 1227-1231", page 123, mentions:
    De maneriis commissis Rogero la Suche.- Dominus rex maneria de Branton’, de Karswell’ et de Depeford’, qua fuerunt in custodian Thome de Cyrenc’, commisit quamdiu etc. Rogero In Zuche, cui similiter commisit custodiam comitatus Devonie. Et mandatum est eidem Thome quod do predictis maneriis saisinam et habere faciat, salvis regi bladis et instauris que habet. in eisdem maneriis. Testa ut supra.
  56. "Calendar of the Patent Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office, Henry III, 1225-1232", page 188, states:
    [1228] De protectione. - Rogerus la Zuche, qui de licentia domini regis ad partes Britannie profectus est, habet litteras de protectione duraturas usque ad Natale Domini anno etc. xiij. Teste rege, apud Geldeford, xv die Maii.
  57. "Calendar of the Patent Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office, Henry III, 1225-1232", page 226, states:
    [1229] De comitatu Devonie commisso Rogero la Suche. - Dominus rex commisit Rogero la Suche comitatum Devonie cum pertinenciis custodiendum quamdiu domino regi placuerit. Et mandatum est archiepiscopis, episcopis etc. quod eidem Rogero tamquam vicecomiti in hiis que ad predictum comitatum pertinent, intendentes sint et respondentes. In cujus etc. Teste rege, apud Westmonasterium, x die Novembris.
  58. "Calendar of the liberate rolls preserved in the Public Record Office", Vol 1, p128 states:
    [May 7 1229] Liberate to Philip de Albin[iaco], Godfrey de Craucumbe and Roger la Suche, going on the king's message to parts beyond sea, 100 marks for their expenses.
  59. "Calendar of the Patent Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office, Henry III, 1225-1232", page 259, states:
    [1229] De navibus arestandis per vicecomitem et quosdam milites. - Rex omnibus ballivis et aliis de portubus maris in comitatibus Sussexie et Kancie, salutem. Mittimus ad vos Robertum de Aubervill, una cum vicecomitibus nostris predictorum comitatuum, ad arestandum omnes naves in portubus predictorum comitatuum inventas, et ad capiendum bonam et sufficientem securitatem de magistris navium illarum quod erunt apud Portesmue cum eisdem navibus ad festum Sancti Michaelis proximo instantis, parati ire in servicium nostrum quo preceperimus.
    Et ideo vobis mandamus quod predicto Roberto et vicecomitibus sitis inde intendentes et respondentes. Teste ut supra.
    Eodem modo scribitur ballivis et aliis de portubus comitatuum:-
    Devonie et Cornubie de Rogero La Suche et vicecomitibus.
  60. "Calendar of the Patent Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office, Henry III, 1225-1232", page 264, states:
    [26 July 1229] De navibus retinendis ad passagium regis et aliis parvis dimittendis. - Rex Roberto de Aubervill et vicecomitibus Sussexie et Kantie, salutem. Mandamus vobis firmiter precipientes quatinus in fide qua nobis tenemini, omnes naves quas per preceptum nostrum arestastis in singulis portubus predictorum comitatuum Sussexie et Kancie et que xvj equos et amplius ferre poterunt, ad opus nostrum retineatis; ita quod naves illas promptas habeamus et paratas apud Portesmue in instanti festo Sancti Michaelis anno etc. xiij, ad eundum in servicium nostrum. Alias autem naves minores in predictis portubus arestatas, que nec xvj equos nec amplius ferre possunt, abire permittatis quo voluerint. In cujus etc. vobis mittimus. Teste rege, apud Windlesor, v die Septembris.
    Eodem modo scribitur:-
    Rogero La Suche et vicecomitibus Cornubie et Devonie.
  61. "Calendar of the Patent Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office, Henry III, 1225-1232", page 349/50, states:
    [1229] Willelmus de Paunton de Hales, Robertus de Legh, Robertus de Mere et Robertus de Esning constituti sunt justiciarii ad assisam nove dissaisine capiendam apud Stafford in crastino Sancti Hillarii, quam Margareta Raggot aramiavit versus Rogerum la Suche de tenemento in Blimenhull; salvia etc.
  62. "Calendar of the Patent Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office, Henry III, 1225-1232", page 357-362 has a long list of men who were given protection while going overseas with the king. Roger is listed on page 360
  63. "Close Rolls of the reign of Henry III, preserved in the Public Record Office, 1227-1231", page 309
  64. "Close Rolls of the reign of Henry III, preserved in the Public Record Office, 1227-1231", page 345
  65. "Close Rolls of the reign of Henry III, preserved in the Public Record Office, 1227-1231", page 387
  66. "Memoires pour servir de preuves - Histoire ecclesiastique et civile de Bretagne", Morice, Book 1, col 783
    Exchange fait entre Alain Vicomte de Rohan & Roger de la Zouch.
    Transumptum. Sciant praesentes & futuri quod ego Rogerus de la Zouch dedi & concessi, & hac praesenti carta mea confirmavi Alano Vicecomiti de Rohan totam terram meam quam habui in Britannia, scilicet parochiam Plemieuc cum omnibus pertinentiis simul cum Prioratu de Bodioc, & totam terram Willelmi filii Garini, quam habuit in eadem parochia de Plemieuc, salvo maritagio filiae dicti Willelmi filii Garini, scilicet quarta parte terrae illius, in escambium manerii sui de Veswasseya & terrae fuae de Foleborne cum pertinentiis, tenendam & habendam sibi & heredibus suis de Domino E. filio Comitis & heredibus suis, ita libere & quiete sicut ego & praedecessores mei illam unquam melius & liberius tenuimus fine aliquo retenemento michi & heredibus meis. Et ut haec mea donatio & concessio firma & stabilis permaneat, praesentem cartam sigillo meo duxi roborandam. His testibus Domino Bonabe de Roge, Domino Rad. Keriel, Domino P. de Montauban, Domino A. Veleer, Domino E. Karou, Domino Willelmo filio E. R. de Pomelec, & multis allis.
  67. "Calendar of the Charter Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office, Vol I, 1226-1257", page 125, includes:
    [1230] Grant to Roger la Zuch, and his heirs, of the gift of Alan, viscount of Rohan, made to him of the whole manor of Swavesey and of land in Fuleburn in exchange for all the lands which the said Roger had in Brittany.
  68. "Close Rolls of the reign of Henry III, preserved in the Public Record Office, 1231-1234", page 95, mentions:
    De damis datis. - Mandatum est P. de Rivall' quod in foresta de Wauberg' faciat habere uxori Rogeri la Suche duos damos, de dono regis. Teste rege apud Evesham, xv. die Augusti.
  69. "Memoires pour servir de preuves - Histoire ecclesiastique et civile de Bretagne", Morice, Book 1, col 882
    Autre lettre sur le meme sujet.
    Henricus Rex Angliae &c dilecto & fideli nostro Roger la Zuche, salutem. Mandamus vobis rogantes quatenus, sicut nos & honorem nostrum diligitis, mittatis nobis unum militem vestrum, it quod sit apud Portesmue in octabis Ascensionis Domini anno regni nostri decimo octavo; ita paratus equis & armis ad transfretandum ad custum nostrum ad Comitem Britanniae, & ad morandum in servitio nostro, sicut idem Comes ei plenius dicet ex parte nostra, quod grates vobis inde scire debeamus. Teste meipso apud Gloucestr 25 die Maii anno regni nostri 18. Eodem modo scibatur: Hugoni Paynel, Richardo de Gray, Joanni de Gray, Henrico de Tybetot, Rapulpho Basset deDraiton, Joanni Talebot, Willelmo de Cantilupo, Willelmo de Albinaco, Petro de Malo-lacu, Joanni de Burgo, &c. Titre de la Tour de Londres dans Rymer, tome 1, p 331.
  70. "Annales de Theokesberia", page 104/5, from "Annales Monastici", volume 1, includes a copy of Henry III's confirmation of Magna Carta, dated 28th January 1237, to which "Rogero de la Chuche" is amongst the witnesses.
  71. "Close Rolls of the reign of Henry III, preserved in the Public Record Office, 1237-1242", page 53, mentions:
    De terris Rogeri la Zuch'.- Mandatum est vicecomiti Salop' quod per sacramentum etc. inquirat quantum terre Rogerus de la Zusch' tenuit de rege in capite in predicto comitatu et per quod servitium et quantum valeat et quis propinquior heres ejus sit; et inquisitionem mittat et ad catalla que fuerunt ejusdem Rogeri manum non mittat donec rex aliud inde preceperit. Teste ut supra.
    Eodem modo scribitur vicecomiti Devon'.
  72. "Close Rolls of the reign of Henry III, preserved in the Public Record Office, 1237-1242", page 61/2, mentions:
    Pro Alano filio Rogeri la Zuch'.- Rex cepit homagium Alani filii et heredis Rogeri la Zuch' de terris quas tenuit in capite de rege in comitatu Devon' et de terris et feodis que tenuit in capite de rege in comitatu Salopie et relevium suum ei inde perdonavit. Et mandatum est predictis vicecomitibus (sic) quod de predictis terris ei plenam saisinam habere faciant in bailliis suis et si quid inde ceperit (sic) plene ei restituat. Teste rege apud Westmonasterium, xvj. die Junii.
  73. The only document which names Rogers's son William, is William's confirmation of his ancestors' grants to Swavesey Abbey (74). However he also held Kings Nympton which was granted to him by Roger. (He apparently held it from his elder brother Alan (75), even though their father had granted it to William (76)(77)).
  74. Dugdale's "Monasticon", volume 6, page 1002, num III, sub Priory of Swavesey, reads:
    Carta Willielmi la Zouche.
    Omnibus Christi fidelibus ad quos praesentes literae pervenerint, Willielmus la Zouche, filius Rogeri la Zouche, salutem in Domino sempiternam. Noveritis nos inspexisse omnes chartas et munimenta Rogeri patris nostri, ac chartas et munimenta Alani Zuche avi nostri quondam comitis Britanniae facta prior de Swavesey. Nos igitur praefatus Willielmus omnes chartas et munimenta praedicta confirmavimus, &c. Et quandocunque et quotiescunque contigerit dictum prioratum in aliquo tempore de priore vacare, volumus et concedimus, pro nobis, haeredibus, et assignatis nostris, quod praesentatus sive denominatus sit a venerabili viro abbate sancti Sergii et Bachi Andegavensis, qui pro tempore fureit, et statim sine aliqua difficultate, per nos seu assignatos nostros admittatur, in quorumcunque manus manerium nostrum de Swavesey imposterum devenrit; et ulterius per nos seu assignatos episcopo dioecesis ibidem praesentetur et instituatur secundum consuetudinem patriae ibidem usitatam.

    The charter is undated, but can be estimated to have been made between the death of William's brother Alan in 1270 (as prior to that date, Alan held Swavesey), and William's own death in 1272.
    William names his father Roger la Zouch and his grandfather as Alan la Zouch, Earl of Brittany. Whilst the genealogy is correct, Alan la Zouch was not Earl of Brittany. However the family had ties with the aristocracy of Brittany going back many generations (for example Alan's brother Eudo was Duke of Brittany by right of his wife, and Swavesey had come to his father from the Vicomtes of Rohan, in Brittany), so it is quite feasible that William (or the scribe who wrote/copied the charter) was under the misaprehension that Alan held that title.
  75. "The book of Fees, commonly called Testa de Nevill, Part II, 1242-1293", page 761, has the following entry, dated 1242-43, sub Devon :
    Et quod Willelmus la Zuch' tenet Nimeton' de Alano la Zuch' in dominico, nullum faciens servicium, et Alanus de domino rege in capite.
  76. "The book of Fees, commonly called Testa de Nevill, Part II, 1242-1293", page 1370, has the following entry, dated 1238, sub Devon :
    Et Nimeton' fuit escaetta domini regis de terra Normannorum. et Willelmus de la Zuche tenet ipsam de dono Rogeri de la Zuche qui ipsam habuit de ballio domini regis.
  77. "The book of Fees, commonly called Testa de Nevill, Part II, 1242-1293", page 1427, has the following entry, dated (on page 1423) 1248/49, sub Devon :
    De escaetis, dicunt quod manerium de Niminton' Regis fuit escaeta domini regis per mortem Joelis de Moyne, Normanni, et dominus Johannes Rex dedit manerium illud Rogero la Szusch', et idem Rogerus dedit illud Willelmo la Szusch' qui modo tenet illud, et valet per annum x.l.
  78. No document has been found which names Eudo (or Eon) as son of Roger. However he is named as brother of Roger's eldest son Alan (79).
  79. "Patent Rolls of the reign of Henry III, 1258-1266", page 238, includes the entry:
    To Thomas de Orreby, justice of Chester. Whereas the whole march of Wales is disturbed by L. son of Griffin and his accomplices so that unless a speedy remedy be applied great loss and peril may ensue, the king is sending Alan la Zuche, justice of the forest on this side Trent, to the said march for the preservation of the peace and the defence of those parts, he commands the justice to deliver the castles of Edward, the king's son, to wit, Chester, Beston and Shotwik to Eudo la Zuche, brother ot the said Alan, without delay to keep in the name of the said Alan until his arrival, and behave himself so manfully and powerfully about the defence of those parts that the king can commend his diligence and probity.
  80. "Calendar of inquisitions post mortem and other analogous documents" Vol 2, entry 305 on p173 contains:
    HENRY DE PENEBRIGG.
    WILTS. Inq. Thursday the feast of the Holy Innocents, 8 Edw. I,
          Tudeworth. The manor was held by Roger la Suche of John Biset, and he gave it to Gilbert de Stanford with Lora his daughter in free marriage, and the said Gilbert being dead, the said Lora gave the same to Arrabilia late the wife of the said Henry and to Fulk their son, by service of Id. yearly. The manor is now in the king's hand. The jury know not whether he held the other manors named in the writ (missing), of the king in chief.
  81. No document has been found which names Alice as daughter of Roger. However she is named as sister of Roger's eldest son Alan (82)(83).
  82. "Patent Rolls of the reign of Henry III, 1266-1272", page 120, includes the entry:
    Orabilla and Margery de Harecurt, daughters of William de Harecurt and Alan's nieces, to his said nieces of the ransom ot the value of the manors of the said William of Tonge and Ayliston with the soke of Straton, belonging to the king by occasion of the trespasses of the said William, who was against the king in the time of the disturbance had in the realm; to hold according to the award of Kenilworth.
  83. "Calendar of inquisitions post mortem and other analogous documents" Vol 3, entry 340 on p209 contains:
    FULK DE PENEBRIGG alias DE PENBRYGGE, DE PENNEBRUGG.
    SALOP. Inq. 11 July, 24 Edw. I.
          Tonge. The manor (extent given), including fishery of the pond, and a chaplet of rose and three arrows (flectas), price ½d, held of Sir Alan de la Zouche without service; which manor Sir Alan de la Zouche, grandfather of the present Alan, gave with Alice his sister, grandmother of Sir Fulk, in free marriage.
  84. "Calendar of the Patent Rolls preserved in the Public Record Office, Henry III, 1216-1225", page 246, states:
    [1220] De peregrinacione Rogeri la Zuche. Rex omnibus presentes litteras inspecturis, salutem. Sciatis nos dedisse licenciam dilecto et fideli nostro Rogero la Zuche eundi peregre ad Sanctum Jacobum. Ita quod si de eo humanitus contingat in itinere illo, habeat omnia catalla sua et omnes exitus terrarum suarum a festo Sancti Michaelis anno regni nostri quarto in unum annum, ad debita sua acquietanda, salvis Margarete uxori ipsius Rogeri maritagio et dote sua. Et in hujus etc. Teste H. etc. apud Oxoniam, vj die Augusti, anno etc.



Notes:

He is also said to have had a son Henry, whose existence is proven in "Select Cases in the Exchequer of Pleas", Seldon Society, 1932. This needs following up.


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