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Roger de Bradburne

circa 1260 - circa 1318

Father Richard or Robert de Bradburne ?
Mother Agatha ?
1st wife Margery
2nd wife Philippa
Children Henry, John, Roger, William, John Richard


Roger was probably born in Bradbourne in or slightly before 1260 (1). His father is not known but was likely called either Richard or Robert (2). His mother was probably called Agatha (4). His only known sibling was a brother John (12)(18), but there may also have been a sister Emma (3), who went on to marry Robert del Burghes (34).

By 1281 he was married to his first wife Margery (7), in possession of the family lands, and was of age, but was not a knight (8).

He held lands under Prince Edmund (13), and in 1283 was witness to a grant by Edmund concerning lands in Cold Eaton and Alsop (9).

He appears regularly in numerous documents from 1284 until 1317 (10), but in none of them is he styled a knight before 1293 (11). Then a decade later, his standing obviously having grown further, he temporarily stood in for Henry de Brailsford, as a collector of taxes on knight's fees, just for about a month in 1303 (14)(15). He was appointed to collect taxes again in his own right in 1307 (16) and then again in 1309 (17). Just two months later, he was commissioned as a Justice for Derbyshire (19). He was again collecting taxes in 1313 (20).

The next June, following an apparent outbreak of lawlessness, he was appointed as a conservator of the peace for Derbyshire, with instructions to search out any wrongdoers (21). Just two weeks later, justices were commissioned to try any wrongdoers found, as well as check up on the conservators previously appointed, and Roger was strangely also commissioned for this (22). Then the following month he was commissioned to deliver all those who had been caught to gaol (23).

Further appointments followed - he was commissioned to supervise the array of arms in 1315 (24). 1316 was a busy year, as he was commissioned to muster men for war with the Scots (25), as well as to raise the taxes to pay for them (28), appointed conservator of the peace again (26), and commissioned (twice) to an oyer & terminer to investigate poaching (27)(29).

He appeared as a witness to a number of documents the following year, 1317 (30)(31)(32), but must have died soon afterwards, as he is doesn't appear again (until he is mentioned as deceased in 1322 (33)).

He had sons Henry, John, Roger and William with his first wife Margery, and sons John and Richard with his second wife Phillipa (34)(35)(36). The dates of his childrens' births or of his marriages are not known, but Henry was probably born before 1293 (being an adult in 1313 (37)), John before 1299 (being an adult in 1319 (37)), Roger being the next heir (34)(35)(36) must have been born before William, who was probably born before 1305 (him likely being an adult in 1325/6 (36)). As his sons by Phillipa appear to have been adults by 1331 (34), it seems likely that he remarried sometime in the first decade of the century.


Brief details of his children:



Sources:

  1. His date of birth is simpy estimated thus:
  2. The lineage prior to Roger is unclear. The visitations show him as son of Richard, living at the time of Edward I [1272-1307], who in turn was the son of Godard (3).
    Historians have not been very clear here either, undoubtably because they were unable to resolve the family. In his "History of the County of Derby", Glover states (without citing any source) : "In the reign of King John [1200-1217], [the manor of Bradburne] was conveyed to Godard de Bradburne, and it continued in this family until the reign of Edward VI. In 1207 Roger de Bradburne held the manor..." Glover's date for Roger was obviously mistaken, and he doesn't mention any intervening generations.
    In his "Churches of Derbyshire", Cox states (without citing any source): "Godard de Bradborne, who was living on his manor of Bradborne or Bradbourn, in the reign of Henry III [1217-1272], is the first of this anciemt family mentioned in the pedigrees. His great great grandson Roger, became connected with the parish of Ashborn by purchasing an estate at Hough, or Hulland. His great grandson, John, seems to have made Hough the chief residence of the family, where he rebuilt the manor house, and founded a chapel". Knowing which John de Bradburne Cox is refering to, indicates that the Roger he is referring to is the grandson of this Roger, which means that Cox claims that this Roger was the grandson of Godard.
    In "The Feudal History of the County of Derby", Vol I Section II. "The Red Book of the Exchequer", Chapter VIII Charter of Robert de Chauz. Page 332/3, Yeatman states : "A Robert de Chaucis held one fee and a half of William Albini, Lord of Belvoir, in Leicestershire, of the old feoffment. Looking at the connection of the Curcis with the house of Belvoir (Roger Albini, the head of that family, tempe the Conquest, having married another daughter of Hugh Grentmesnil), it would seem to refer to that connection. The only Ferrars manor that can be distinctly traced to the Caus family is that of Bradborne, which Lysons states, though he gave no authority, was held at an early period by the family of Caws or de Cauceis. The church was given by Geoffry de Cauceis, in 1205, to the Priory of Dunstable, and he conveyed the manor to Godarde de Bradbourne, in the reign of King John. In all probability this Geoffry de Cauceis was the tenant for one fee of new feoffment mentioned in the certificate of Robert de Cauz, in 1-12 Henry II.".
    Neither of the first two writers present an error free picture of the later family, so their unsourced claims cannot be given any real weight. Both of them agree that Godard was the first of the family living at Bradbourne, and that Roger was his grandson, and that also matches the visitation, however I can find no contemporary mention of Godard. Yeatman is the only person who mentions him outside of trying to build a pedigree of the Bradeburns. The manor was still held by Scolastica, widow of William le Causeis in 1212 (See "Curia Regis Rolls, Vol 6, 11-14 John 1210-1212")
    All I find prior to Roger is:
  3. Pedigree of the Bradburne family in the visitations of 1569 and 1611 (as published in "The Genealogist (New Series)" Volumes 7 & 8).
  4. Roger's son and heir Henry died in 1322, and a number of documents are extant from the years immediately after this which concern his lands around Bradbourne. There are also two documents which refer to the lands of a Henry, son of Roger de Bradburne, a little further afield in Eton, Warwickshire (5)(6). As there is no other record of a land owning Bradburne family in Warwickshire I am assuming that this is the same "Henry son of Roger", in which case the name of Roger's mother is taken from the second of these.
  5. "Patent Rolls of the Reign of Edward II, Vol 5, 1324-1327". Entry on p60 reads:
    [1324] Dec 12 Nottingham. Pardon to Robert de Walryngton of the trespasses touching the manor of Eton by Hedon held in chief as of the honor of Tikhill, as appears by inquisition made by John de Bolyngbrok, escheator in the counties of Warwick, &c. which he granted to Henry son of Roger de Bradeburne in fee and the latter regranted in tail to him and Margery his wife, with remainder to his right heirs of Robert, and both Henry and he entered into without licence; and licence for him to retain the same.
    By fine of 5 marks. Nottingham.
  6. "Close Rolls of the Reign of Edward II, 1323-1327". Entry on p591/2 reads:
    [1326] July 24. To John de Bolyngbrok, escheator in cos. Warwick, Leicester, Nottingham, Derby, and Lancaster. Whereas the king learns by inquisition taken by the escheator that Robert de Wolryngton of Eton held on the day of his death two parts of the manor of Eton of the grant of Henry son of Roger de Bradeburn, to have to him and to Margery his late wife, and to the heirs of their bodies, together with the reversion of a third of the manor, which Agatha, mother of the said Roger, still living, holds in dower, and that the said two parts are held of the king as of the honour of Tikhill by the service of two parts of two knights' fees, and that Robert held no other lands of the king in chief as of the crown on the day of his death by reason whereof the custody of his lands ought to pertain to the king, but that he held divers other lands of other lords by various services, and that Elizabeth, Eleanor, Isabella, and Alice, daughters of Robert and Margery, are the next heirs of Robert and Margery of the lands that are thus held of the king, and that Elizabeth is aged eleven years, Eleanor nine, Isabella eight, and Alice seven; the king orders the escheator to retain in the king's hands the lands held of the king as of the said honour until further orders, and not to intermeddle further with the lands held of other lords, restoring the issues thereof.
  7. "The Rolls of the 1281 Derbyshire Eyre" published by the Derbyshire Record Society. Entry 348 reads:
    Margery wife of Roger de Bradeburn attorns Roger her husband against Ralph le Yape of Assheburne in a plea of land.
  8. "The Rolls of the 1281 Derbyshire Eyre" published by the Derbyshire Record Society. Entry 488 reads:
    Concerning squires, they say that Robert de Dethec and Roger de Bradeborn have a whole knights fee, are of age and are not yet knight, so they are in mercy.
  9. "The Manuscripts of His Grace, the Duke of Rutland, GCB, Preserved at Belvoir Castle", Volume 4. Entry on page 47 reads:
    Oct 1283. Notification by Edmund son of Henry king of England that he has granted to his free men, tenants of lands in the vills of Eyton [Cold Eaton] and Alsop, that they may henceforth have common of pasture with all their own stock on his fee in the manor of Hertindon' [Hartington] as they used to have in the time of Margaret late countess de Ferrariis, without overstocking the pasture. For this grant the said men have given him 100 shillings sterling. Dat[um] apud Esseborne [Ashbourne] .... Hiis testibus: Domino Matheo de Cniveton'; Stephano de Ireton'; Rogero de Bradeborn'; Jordano de Sniterton' (and three others).
    Armorial seal of Edmund : three lions of England and a label.
  10. See for example "The Rolls of the 1281 Derbyshire Eyre", Derbyshire Record Society, entry 90; "The Kniveton Leiger", HMC. entries 25, 35, 36, 50, 52, 55, 56, 57, 66, 72, 73, 82, 85, 89, 97, 104, 112, 114, 119, 126, 137, 138, 140, 143, 167, 189, 190, 194, 199, 200, 203, 247, 251, 271, 275, 285, 293, 299, 348, 433, 438, 439, 445, 453, 455, 456, 478, 500, 512, 519, 520, 521; Collections for a History of Staffs VI.I.169,182; Staffs Record Office ref D(W)1733/A/4/2; Derbys Record Office refs D258/26/2/8, D258/26/7/10, D3287/56/7/7, D231M/T139, D231M/T140; Leics record Office ref 26D53/337; Notts Archives ref DD/FJ/1/105/6; Berkley Castle Muniments ref BCM/D/5/8/5; National Archives ref C 241/28/71; Wolley MSS vi.26, vi.32; Derbyshire Archaelogical Journal 14.6; Cal. Patent Rolls 1307.498, 1309.195; Jeayes Derbyshire Charters entries 338, 1151, 1741, 2549;
  11. Wolley Manuscripts, vi.26. British Library catalogue entry reads:
    Type of document : Grant
    Language : Latin
    Original date : Thursday after Annunccation of B.V.M., 21 Edward I
    Modern date : 20 August 1293
    Measurements : 138 x 197 mm; indented
    Medium : Vellum
    Contents : Grant, bipartide, by Henry de Knyveton to Thomas de Reverewiche of meadowland in the fee of Bradley and Sturston called le Tinkeremedue which Hawise, who was the wife of William de Stretton, once held as part of her dower, except the road by which Thomas, son of Lettice, is able to have ingress and egress to his 'precaria' (boon-work), and 'ad petas suas inde cariandas', and except that part that John, son of Reginald, is accustomed to hold; annual rent, 9s. Dated at Bradley, co. Derby.
    Bibliography : I. H. Jeayes, Derbyshire Charters, no. 401
    Witnesses : Sir Roger de Bradeburne
    Roger Cokayn
    Thomas de Mappleton
    Richard de Fenton
    Hervey de la Grene
    Geoffrey Wichened
    Richard the clerk
    with others (not named)
    Grantors : Henry de Knyveton [Kniveton]
    Grantees : Thomas de Reverewiche
    Seals : Pendent Tag only, seal now missing.
    Full list of places : Bradeley [Bradley, co. Derby]
    Sturston [Sturston, co. Derby]
  12. "The Kniveton Leiger", HMC. Entry 96 precis reads:
    Quitclaim by Robert of Corley, clerk, to Henry of Kniveton of all the land he held of Henry in Bradley, namely a bovate with a toft and croft which John le Roo held, 11½ acres of land and meadow together with the land called Led Doles which John le Roo held, and a toft with two acres (8 July 1294)
    Hiis testibus: domino Rogero de Bradeburn, Johanne fratre suo, Johanne Selveyn, Thoma de Peuerwiz, Matheo de Knyveton, Roberto de la Hul, Hervico de la Grene, Ricardo clerico et aliis. Dat' apud Bradel' in crastino translacionis sancti Thome martiris anno regni regis Edwardii xxiiº.
  13. "Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem and other analogous documents preserved in the Public Record Office, Vol 3, Edward I", entry no. 423, includes:
    EDMUND THE KING'S BROTHER
    ...
    DERBY.
          Bradeborne. The manor held by Roger de Bradeborne for ½ knight's fee.
  14. "Patent Rolls of the Reign of Edward I, Vol 4, 1301-1307". Entry on p117 reads:
    [1303] May 7. Association of John de Langeleye, in the room of Richard de Crapes, who is going to Scotland on the king's affairs with the sheriff of Gloucester, lately appointed to levy and collect in that county 40s. on every knight's fee, granted to the king 1 July, 18 Edward I. by the earls, barons and other magnates, for themselves and the whole commonalty of the realm in full parliament for the marriage of his eldest daughter.
    The like of the following:-
    Roger de Bradeburn, in the room of Henry de Braylesford, who is going to Scotland on the king's service, in the county of Derby.
  15. "Patent Rolls of the Reign of Edward I, Vol 4, 1301-1307". Entry on p144 reads:
    [1303] June 4. Association of Henry de Braylesford in the room of Roger de Bradeburn, who was put in his place for certain causes, with the sheriff of Derby to collect in that county the aid of 40s. on every knight's fee, granted on 1 July, 18 Edward I. by the prelates, earls, barons and other magnates in full parliament for marrying the king's eldest daughter; the first moiety to be delivered at the Exchequer a week after the Purification, the second on the morrow of the Ascension to the treasurer and chamberlains there.
  16. "Patent Rolls of the Reign of Edward II, Vol 1, 1307-1313". Entry on p22-4 reads:
    [1307] Nov 28. Appointment of Richard de Wyndesore and William de Pountz, together with a clerk to be chosen by them, and for whom they are to be responsible, to assess and collect the twentieth and fifteenth for the county of Middlesex granted to the king by the parliament holden at Northampton in the first year of his reign
    The like appointments of the undermentioned, viz :-
    ...
    co Derby
    Henry de Braylesford,
    Roger de Bradeburne
  17. "Patent Rolls of the Reign of Edward II, Vol 1, 1307-1313". Entry on p183-6 reads:
    [1309] Aug 26. Appointment of Richard le Brun, William de Molecastre, Alexander de Bastenthwayt, and Robert Tilliol, together with a clerk to be chosen by them, to assess and levy the twenty-fifth upon all movable goods in the county of Cumberland for the war in Scotland, and to pay the same into the Exchequer on the morrow of the feasts of St. Hilary and Holy Trinity. Any two of the commissioners with the clerk to form a quorum.
    The like appointments of the undermentioned, viz :-
    ...
    co Derby
    Henry de Braylesford,
    Henry de Knyveton,
    Roger de Bradeburne
  18. "The Kniveton Leiger", HMC. Entry 203 precis reads:
    Quitclaim by William Foljaumbe of Gratton to Henry of Kniveton of 2s 6d rent in Kniveton (13 December 1309)
    Witnesses list begins ..:
    Hiis testibus: domino Rogero de Bradeburn', Johanne fratre suo ....
  19. "Patent Rolls of the Reign of Edward II, Vol 1, 1307-1313". Entry on p248-50 reads:
    [1309] Dec 18. Commission to Henry de Cobeham the younger, John de Northwode and Roger de Tokton to enquire touching all prises taken in the county of Kent for the king's use, or for the use of other persons, contrary to the statute made in the Parliament at Stamford; as well as the names of such and who unduly burthened others. They are to hear and reduce to writing the complaints of persons who are aggrieved; and to attach all offenders, who are to appear before the king and council. The names of such persons who are not to be found in the county are also to be returned before the king and council, as well as a full report of the entire proceedings of the justices.
    Mandate to the coroners for the county of Kent to make proclamation that all aggrieved persons are to appear before the above-named justices to prefer their complaints.
    The like appointments of the under-mentioned, viz:-
    ...
    co Derby
    Henry de Cnyveton,
    Roger de Bradeburne,
    Richard Curzon of Brideshale
  20. "Patent Rolls of the Reign of Edward II, Vol 2, 1313-1317". Entry on p50 reads:
    [1313] Nov 28. Appointment of William de Broke and Walter Crepyn, together with a clerk to be chosen by them, to assess and collect the twentieth and fifteenth for the county of Middlesex; the money to bo paid into the Exchequer on the following terms, viz. one moiety on tho morrow of the elose of Easter, 1314, and the other moiety on the morrow of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist, 1314. [Parl Writs]
    The like appointments of assessors and collectors for the undermentioned counties, viz :-
    ...
    co Derby
    John de Eyncurt,
    Roger de Bradeborne
  21. "Patent Rolls of the Reign of Edward II, Vol 2, 1313-1317". Entry on p122/3 reads:
    [1314] June 5. Appointment of Henry de Cobeham, the younger, Roger le Sauvage and Richard de Rokesleye to be conservators of the peace and ot the statute of Winchester in the county ot Kent, as the king understands, from the loud complaint of his people, that after he set out upon his march to Scotland, great outrages had been committed as well by knights as others, who confederated together, held conventicles and other unlawful assemblies, as well by day as night, committed assaults and murders, broke the parks both of the king and his subjects, and hunted the deer, which outrages have not been duly repressed by the sheriffs and other officers and ministers of the king. The conservators are to enquire by the oath of good and lawful men concerning such disturbances and transgressions, and also all other offences against the peace. All persons against whom indictments shall be found, or who shall be notoriously suspected, are to he pursued, taken, and kept in custody by the sheriff so that they be not enlarged without the special command of the king. The posse comitatus is to be raised whenever necessary. The conservators are to make returns from month to month to the Council at Westminster of their proceedings, and of the names of the malefactors. The king will shortly send certain of his lieges into their county to do justice upon the offenders, and also to ascertain whether the conservators have been sufficiently diligent, and how the sheriff has conducted himself therein. [Parl Writs]
    The like appointment of the under-mentioned conservators for divers counties, viz :-
    ...
    co Derby
    Roger de Bradeborne,
    Henry de Braylesford,
    John de Eyncourt
  22. "Patent Rolls of the Reign of Edward II, Vol 2, 1313-1317". Entry on p128/9 reads:
    [1314] June 18. Commission to William Martyn, William de Botreux and Thomas de la Hyde, as tbe king is desirous tbat justice shall be done upon all persons indicted or accused, or who shall hereafter be found guilty before the conservators of the peace appointed for the counties of England by commissions dated 5 June last, for them or two of them to enquire in the counties of Devon and Cornwall of all felonies and trespasses in parks and fishponds, and other offences committed since Palm Sunday, 31 March last, whether the conservators have acted with due diligence, and also touching the action ot the sheriffs; they are to punish the conservators and sheriffs according to the gravity of their demerits, and to hear and determine all such felonies and trespasses as well at the king's suit as the suit of any other person. [Parl Writs]
    The like commisions for the under-mentioned commissioners for their respectve counties, viz :-
    ...
    Nottingham & Derby
    Walter de Gousle,
    Roger de Bradeburne,
    Richard de Wylughby
  23. "Patent Rolls of the Reign of Edward II, Vol 2, 1313-1317". Entry on p225/6 reads:
    [1314] July 10. Appointment of Robert son of Payn, Walter de Pavely, John Randolf and William de Hardene, or three of them, to be justices of gaol delivery in the counties of Somerset, Dorset, and Wilts, for the trial, as well of persons indicted, or to be indicted, of felonies and other trespasses before the keepers of the peace, since the king set out upon his journey towards Scotland, viz. since Palm Sunday, as of all others, &c. [Parl Writs]
    The like appointment of the under-mentioned justices of gaol delivery for the following counties, viz :-
    ...
    Nottingham & Derby
    Walter de Gousle,
    Roger de Bradeburne,
    Richard de Wylughby
  24. "Patent Rolls of the Reign of Edward II, Vol 2, 1313-1317". Entry on p350/1 reads:
    [1315] Sept 1. Commission to Henry de Cobeham, the younger, and William de Basyng, reciting part of the statute of Winchester and the late writs of proclamation to the sheriffs, and appointing them supervisors of the array of arms in the county of Kent. They are to enforce the execution of the writ, and to report defaulters to the king before All Saints, with the assistance of the sheriff and such others in the county as may be necessary. [Parl Writs]
    The like to the following in the counties named :-
    ...
    co Derby
    Roger de Bradeburne,
    John Deyncourt
  25. "Patent Rolls of the Reign of Edward II, Vol 2, 1313-1317". Entry on p460 reads:
    [1316] March 26. Appointment of Richard de Horsle, Roger Heyron and Nicholas Scot, to be commissioners of array in the county of Northumberland, for the general hosting for the war against the Scots. The muster is to beheld at Newcastle-on-Tyne on the quinzaine of Midsummer. [Parl Writs]
    The like of the under-mentioned to be commissioners of array in their respective counties, viz :-
    ...
    co Derby
    Walter de Goushille,
    Roger de Bradeburne,
    John Deyncourt
  26. "Patent Rolls of the Reign of Edward II, Vol 2, 1313-1317". Entry on p482 reads:
    [1316] June 14. Appointment of Walter Leuueyse and Geoffrey de la Lee, pursuant to the statute of Wincheater, to be conservators of tbe peace for the county of Hertford with the usual powers. Persons indicted or suspected are to be committed to prison until delivered according to law. [Parl Writs]
    Tbe like of the undermentioned persons to be conservators of the peace in their respective counties, viz :-
    ...
    co Derby
    Roger de Bradburne,
    John Deyncurt
  27. "Patent Rolls of the Reign of Edward II, Vol 2, 1313-1317". Entry on p482 reads:
    [1316] July 20. Commission of oyer and terminer to William Inge, Plillip de Say and Roger de Bradeburn, touching divers alleged trespasses of vert and venison in the forest of High Peak, co. Derby, held at will by queen Isabella of the king's grant; all fines and ransoms which shall be taken from transgressors convicted before them shall be taken for the use of tbe queen.
  28. "Calendar of Fine Rolls Preserved at the Public record Office, Vol 2, 1307-1319". Entry on p296 reads:
    [1316] Aug 5 Order to Richard de Horsle, Roger Heyrtm and Nicholas Scot, Lincoln. whom the king appointed to elect from every town in the county of Northumberland, the king's cities, boroughs and demesnes excepted, an armed footman to come on the king's service against the Scots, the king's enemies and rebels, and to provide that the men of those towns should find for such footmen their expenses until they should come to the place where the service due to the king should be summoned for the expedition of the said war and thereafter for sixty days going with the king against the Scots, each footman taking 4d a day, and whom afterwards the king ordered to elect the same footmen and assess their expenses according to a form before sent to them and to permit the said arms and expenses to remain with the said towns until further order, to meddle no further with such election or anything touching that business, and to send to the Exchequer all the money now in their hands and the hands of the men of the said towns by virtue of the king's last order to them, to be delivered in the treasury on the octave of the Assumption next, all such money levied from the men of the said towns to be allowed to them in the sixteenth granted by the commons of the realm on movable goods possessed at Michaelmas next for the expedition of the said war, in consideration whereof the king has released the said aid of footmen; and to make indentures of the names of those from whom the said money has been levied and of the said sums between them and any persons of the said townships, and to deliver such indentures to the taxers and collectors of the sixteenth, when they come to those parts, that they may be able to make the allowance due. The like to the following in the following counties :
    ...
    Walter de Goushill, Roger de Bradeburn and John Deincourt. Derby
  29. "Patent Rolls of the Reign of Edward II, Vol 2, 1313-1317". Entry on p482 reads:
    [1316] Dec 3. Commission of oyer and terminer to Bichard de Wylughby, Roger de Bradebnrn and Henry de Hambury, touching the persons who entered the park of Richard But at Waleton-on-Trent, co Derby, hunted therein and carried away deer.
    Changed because sealed otherwise at the instance of Walter Waldeshef
  30. "Descriptive catalogue of Derbyshire charters", Jeayes. Entry 147 reads:
    Grant from Dom. Roger de Ocouere, Dominus de Attelowe, to William de Knyveton, Dominus de Bradeleye, that they may put to use one piece of waste in Attelowe called le Heyedewode, lying between le Rugebrok, le Ouleclough, le Skouteok, and the rivers which run under the mill of Attelowe, and may grub up, plough, and sow, or make a meadow of the same, as it may seem best to him, reserving to the said Roger common of pasture thereon after the hay and corn shall be carried. Witn. Dom. Roger de Bradeburn, knt., Mag. John de Bradeburn, clerk, William de Hopton, Ralph de Muntioye, etc. Dat. S. a. r. of St. Laurence [2 Feb.], 10 Edw. II. [1317] (Okeover.)
  31. "Okeover of Okeover" archive at Derbyshire Record Office. Item ref D231M/T141. Catalogue entry reads:
    1317
    Grant by William de Knyveton [Kniveton] to Roger de Ocovere [Okeover] that he (Roger) may put to use a "waste place" in Attelowe [Atlow] called le Heyedewode lying between le Rugebrok and le Ouleclough and le Skoutlok and the streams which flow under the mill at Attlowe, that he (Roger) may grub up, plough, sow or make a meadow in the same, whichever seems best to him, saving to William and his heirs common of pasture in that place
    Witnesses: Roger de Bradeburn [Bradbourne], knight, Master John de Bradburn, clerk, William de Hopton, Ralph de Muntioye, Robert de la Cale and others
    Sunday after the Feast of St Laurence (7 Feb) 10 Edward II
  32. Wolley Manuscripts, ix.81. British Library catalogue entry reads:
    Type of document : Lease
    Language : French
    Original date : St Clement, 11 Edward II
    Modern date : 23 November 1317
    Measurements : 144 x 221 mm; indented
    Medium : Vellum
    Contents : Grant by Margery, widow of Serlo de Mungjoye, to Robert de Irlande, of her dower in Yeldersley and Urlewyke; annual rent, 5 marks and 10s.
    Endorsement : Yeldersley.
    Bibliography : I. H. Jeayes, Derbyshire Charters, no. 2726
    Witnesses : Sir Roger de Bradeburne
    Sir Nicholas de Marchentone
    William de ?...
    ... de ?...
    John son of ?...
    William de ?...
    with others (not named)
    Grantors : Margery widow of Serlo de Mungjoye [Mountjoy]
    Grantees : Robert de Irlande [Ireland]
    Seals : Pendent Tag and seal missing
    Full list of places : Yhildersele [Yeldersley, co. Derby]
    Bradeburne [Bradbourne, co. Derby]
    Marchenton [Marchington, co. Staff.]
  33. The National Archives. Ancient petitions. Ref SC 8/8/396. Catalogue entry reads:
    Petitioners: Philippa [de Bradeburn (Bradbourne)] widow of Roger de Bradbourne.
    Addressees: King and council.
    Places mentioned: Bradbourne, [Derbyshire]; Burwes [unidentified], [Derbyshire]; Howe (Heage), [Derbyshire].
    Other people mentioned: Roger de Bradeburn (Bradbourne); Henry [de Bradeburn (Bradbourne)].
    Nature of request: Philippa, the widow of Roger de Bradeburn states that Henry, Roger's son and heir dowered her with lands and tenements in Derbyshire, especially in the manors of Bradbourne and Heage and in 'Le Burwes', but also with a third of the rest of his inheritance throughout the county; and that Henry enfeoffed, gave, granted and confirmed all the rest of his inheritance to her, to hold to her and her heirs forever - as his charter on the matter shows - and put her in seisin of this on the Friday following the feast of the translation of St Thomas last, when he went overseas on the business of the earl of Lancaster. She remained in seisin during the whole of Henry's life and after, until the king's escheator seized the lands and tenements into his hand because of Henry's forfeiture. She requests a remedy.
    Endorsement: Certain faithful people are to be appointed to enquire into the contents of the petition, and, when the inquisition on this has been returned in Chancery, justice is further to be done to her.
    Covering dates [1322]
    Note: CCR 1318-1323, p.625 is dated at Newark, 25 January 1323, and states that an inquisition has been held which has shown Philippa's claims to be true. It also says that she was given the lands on the Friday after the translation of St Thomas (7 July) in the fifteenth year of the king's reign - so early July 1321 - and held them until the Saturday before the Annunciation next following - March 1322. This petition is then datable between March 1322 and January 1323.
  34. "Derbyshire Feet of Fines 1323-1546", Derbyshire Record Society, 1985. Entry no 735 reads:
    Westminster. Quindene of Easter 1331. Plaintiff: Roger de Bradeburn and Maude his wife by Henry de la Pole attorney for Maude by brief of the king. Deforciant: John de Brerton. Concerning (i) 2 messuages and 1 caracute and 30 acres of land in Knyveton and Peverwych which William son of Roger de Bradeburn held for life; (ii) 30 acres of land in Oftecote and Underwode which John de Bradeburn, senior, held for life; (iii) 4 acres of land in Longeleye which Henry de Meynill held for life; (iv) 4 acres of land in Longeleye which Emma, widow of Robert del Burghes held as dowry; (v) a moiety of a mill in Wyrkesworth which Richard son of Roger de Bradeburn held for life; (vi) the other moiety of the same mill which John, Richard's brotherheld for life of the inheritence of John de Brerton; and (vii) the manor of Bradeburn, 2 messuages, 2 mills, 1 caracute 32 acres of land, 10 acres of meadow, 3 acres of woodland and £6 3s 3d rent in Assheburne, Oftecote, Underwode, Clyfton, Knyveton, Peverwyche, Fennybenteleye, Holand, Stretton, Wyrkesworth, Wyardeston, Holynton, Yeveleye, Braylesford, Longeleye and Parva Ireton. Roger acknowledged all these tenements to the right of John who had those listed in (vii) of the gift of Roger. John granted and rendered them to Roger and Maude to hold to themselves and the heirs of their bodies of the chief lord etc forever. Remainder to the right heirs of Roger. John also granted that the remaining tenements (i.e.(i) to (vi)), which ought to revert to him and his heirs on the deaths of William, John de Bradeburn senior, Henry, Emma, Richard and his brother John, should remain instead to Roger and Maude and the heirs of their bodies. Remainder to the right heirs of Roger. Endorsed: Thomas son of Roger de Bradeborn lays his claim.
  35. "Derbyshire Feet of Fines 1323-1546", Derbyshire Record Society, 1985. Entry no 830 reads:
    Westminster. Easter three weeks 1346. Plaintff William son of Roger de Bradburne, junior, and Margaret his wife. Deforciant: John Dounville and Maude his wife. Concerning 1 messuage, 1 caracute 5 bovate and 30 acres of land, 10 marks rent and a moiety of a mill in Bradbourne, Assheburne, Wircusworthe, Perwyche, Bentleye and Kneveton, John and Maude granted and rendered the messuage, caracute of land and rent to William and Margaret to hold to themselves and the heirs of their bodies of the chief lord etc forever. They also granted for themselves and the heirs of Maude that (1) the 5 bovates 35 acres of land in Kneveton and Perwyche which William de Bradburne, senior, held for life; and (ii) the moiety of the mill in Wircusworth which Richard de Bradburne and John de Bradburne held for life of the inheritence of Maude, which tenements ought to revert to John Dounville, Maude and Maude's heirs on the deaths of William, Richard and John, should remain instead to William, son of Roger. William and Margret gave 40 marks of Silver.
  36. Entry from the Plea Rolls, National Archives reference CP40/432, folio 469 reads (abbreviations expanded):
    D[omi]n[u]s Rex mandavit Iustic[ariis] suis hic br[ev]e suu[m] clausu[m] in hec v[er]ba E[d]wardus dei gr[aci]a Rex Angl[ie] D[omi]n[u]s hib[er]n[ie] &
    Aquit[anie] Iustic[ariis] suis de Banco sal[u]t[e]m mittim[us] vob[is] sub pede sigilli n[ost]ri transcriptu[m] pedis cuiusdam finis leuati in cur[ia]
    n[ost]ra coram Joh[ann]e de Stonore & soc[iis] suis Iustic[ariis] n[ost]ris de Banco anno regni n[ost]ri vicesimo p[er] breve n[ost]r[u]m Int[er] Will[ielmu]m fil[ium]
    Rog[er]i de Bradburne Iuniore[m] & margareta vx[or]em eius quer[entes] & Joh[ann]em Domville & matill[em] vx[or]em eius deforc[iantes] de uno
    mesuagio vna carucata quinq[ue] bouatis & triginta acris t[er]re decem marcatis redditus & medietate vnius molendini cu[m] p[er]tin[entiis]
    in Bradburne Asshburne Wircusworthe Perwyche Benteleye & Kneveton quod cora[m] nob[is] in cancellar[iam] n[ost]ram c[er]tis
    de causis venire fecim[us] mandantes q[uo]d inspecto enscr[i]pti finis p[re]d[ict]i vlt[er]ius ad p[ro]secuc[i]o[n]em Joh[ann]is de Bradburne
    avunc[u]li & her[edis] p[re]d[i]c[t]i Will[ielm]i fieri fac[iamus] q[uo]d de iure & s[e]c[un]d[u]m lege[s] & consuetudine[s] regni n[ost]ri fue[ri]t faciend[um]
    T[este] me ip[s]o apud Westm[onasterium] x die Novembr[is] anno r[egni] n[ostri] quadragesimo s[e]c[und]o Transcr[i]ptu[m] p[re]d[i]c[tu]m sequ[en]tu[m] in hec
    v[e]rba hec est finalis concordia f[a]c[t]a in cur[ia] d[omi]ni Regis apud Westm[onasterium] a die pasch[is] in tres septi[man]as anno
    regni Edwardi Regis Angl[ie] t[er]cij a conquestu vicesimo & regni eiusde[m] Regis ffranc[ie] septimo coram Joh[ann]e de
    stonore Will[ielm]o de sharshull rog[er]o hillary Ric[hard]o de Kelleshull Ric[hard]o de Wylughby & Joh[ann]e de stonford
    Iustic[ariis] & aliis d[omi]ni Regis fidelib[us] tunc ibi p[re]sentib[us] Int[er] Will[ielmu]m fil[ium] Rog[er]i de Bradeburne Iuniore[m] & margareta[m] vx[or]em
    eius quer[entes] & Joh[ann]em Domville & matill[em] vx[or]em eius deforc[iantes] de vno mesuagio vna carucata quinq[ue] bouatis &
    triginta acris t[er]re decem marcatis redditus & medietate vnius molendini cu[m] p[er]tin[entiis] in Bradeburne Asshburne
    Wircusworthe Perwyche Benteleye & Kneveton vnde pl[ac]itum conuenc[i]o[n]is sum[monitum] fuit int[er] eos in eade[m] cur[ia] scil[ice]t q[uo]d
    p[re]d[i]c[t]i Joh[ann]es & matill[is] concesserunt p[re]d[i]c[t]is Will[ielm]o & margarete p[re]d[i]c[t]a mesuagiu[m] carucata[m] t[er]re & redditu[m] cu[m] p[er]tin[entiis]
    Et illa eis reddiderunt in eadem cur[ia] h[ab]end[um] & tenend[um] eisdem Will[ielm]o & margarete & her[edibus] de corp[or]ib[us] ip[s]or[um]
    Will[ielm]i & margarete exeuntib[us] de capit[alibus] d[omi]nis feodi illius p[er] s[er]vicia que ad illa ten[ementa] p[er]tinent imp[er]p[etuu]m Et p[re]t[er]ea
    ijdem Joh[ann]es & matill[is] concesserunt p[ro] se & her[edibus] ip[s]ius matill[is] q[uo]d quinq[ue] bouate & triginta & quinq[ue] acre t[er]re cu[m] p[er]tin[entiis]
    in p[re]d[i]c[t]is villis de Kneveton & Perwyche quae Will[ielmu]s de Bradburne senior tenuit ad t[er]minu[m] vite Et eciam
    q[uo]d medietas p[re]d[i]c[t]i molendini cum p[er]tin[entiis] in p[re]d[i]c[t]a villa de Wircusworth qua[m] Ric[hard]us de Bradburne & Joh[ann]es de Bradburne
    tenuerunt ad t[er]minu[m] vite de h[er]editate p[re]d[i]c[t]e matill[is] die quo hec concordia f[a]c[t]a fuit Et que post decessu[m] ip[s]or[um] Will[ielm]i
    de Bradburne senioris Ric[hard]i & Joh[ann]is de Bradburne ad p[re]d[i]c[t]os Joh[ann]em Domville & matill[em] & her[edes] ip[s]ius matill[is] debuerunt
    rev[er]ti post decessum ip[s]or[um] Will[ielm]i de Bradburne senioris Ric[hard]i & Joh[ann]is de Bradburne integre remaneant p[re]d[i]c[t]is Will[ielm]o
    fil[io] Rog[er]i & margarete & heredib[us] suis p[re]d[i]c[t]is Tenend[um] simul cu[m] p[re]d[i]c[t]is mesuagio carucata t[er]re & redditu que eis
    p[er] finem istum remanent de capit[alibus] d[omi]nis feodi illius p[er] s[er]vicia que ad illa ten[ementa] pertinent imp[er]p[etuu]m Et si contingat
    q[uo]d ijdem Will[ielmu]s fil[ius] Rog[er]i & margareta obierint sine herede de corp[or]ib[us] suis exeunte tunc post decessu[m] ip[s]or[um]
    Will[ielm]i & margarete p[re]d[i]c[t]a ten[ementa] cu[m] p[er]tin[entiis] integre remanebunt rectis heredib[us] p[re]d[i]c[t]i Will[ielm]i fil[ii] Rog[er]i Tenend[um] de capit[alibus]
    d[omi]nis feodi illius p[er] s[er]vicia que ad p[re]d[i]c[t]a ten[ementa] p[er]tinent imp[er]p[etuu]m Et p[ro] hac concessione reddic[i]o[n]e fine & concordia ijdem
    Will[ielmu]s fil[ius] Rog[er]i & margareta dederunt p[re]d[i]c[t]is Joh[ann]i Domville & matill[i] quadraginta marcas argenti Et sup[er]
    hec ven[it] quidam Joh[ann]es de Aston ex p[ar]te p[re]d[i]c[t]i Joh[ann]is de Bradburne & dic[it] q[uo]d p[re]d[i]c[t]us Will[ielmu]s de Bradburne senior
    obiit & q[uo]d p[re]d[i]c[t]i Will[ielmu]s fil[ius] Rog[er]i & margareta obierunt sine herede de corp[or]ib[us] suis exeunte & q[uo]d p[re]d[i]c[t]i Joh[ann]es Domville
    & matillis vxor eius p[re]d[i]c[t]a mesuagiu[m] carucata[m] & triginta acras t[er]re & redditu[m] cum p[er]tin[entiis] in p[re]d[i]c[t]is vill[i]s de Bradburne
    Asshburne Benteleye & Kneveton que sunt p[ar]cell[a] ten[enementorum] p[re]d[i]c[t]or[um] in d[i]c[t]o fine content[o] ingressi sunt se q[uo]d quidam
    Nich[ola]us fitz huerd & Joh[ann]es Whythed p[ar]sona medietat[is] eccl[es]ie de mogynton p[re]d[i]c[t]as quinq[ue] bouat[as] t[er]re cu[m] p[er]tin[entiis]
    in p[re]d[i]c[t]a villa de Perwyche ingressi sunt & eas tenent cont[ra] forma[m] finis p[re]d[i]c[t]i Et pet[it] inde vnu[m] br[ev]e vic[o]
    Derb[iensis] ad p[re]muniend[um] p[re]d[i]c[t]es Joh[ann]em Domville & matill[em] et aliud br[ev]e eidem vic[o] ad p[re]muniend[um] p[re]d[i]c[t]es Nich[olau]m
    & Joh[ann]em Whythed essend[a] hic a die s[an]c[t]i hillar[ii] in xv dies osten[dendum] si quid it[a] vid[e]l[ice]t p[re]d[i]c[t]i Joh[ann]es Domville
    & matill[is] quare p[re]d[i]c[t]a ten[ementa] cu[m] p[er]tin[entiis] que ip[s]i tenent in forma p[re]d[i]c[t]a Et p[re]d[i]c[t]i Nich[ola]us & Joh[ann]es Whythed
    osten[dendum] quare p[re]d[i]c[t]e quinq[ue] bouate t[er]re quas ip[s]i tenet in forma p[re]d[i]c[t]a post morte[s] p[re]d[i]c[t]or[um] Will[ielm]i de Bradburne
    senioris Will[ielm]i fil[ii] Rog[er]i & margarete p[re]fati Joh[ann]i de Bradburne avunc[u]li & her[edis] p[re]d[i]c[t]i Will[ielm]i fil[ii] Rog[er]i
    reman[er]e non debeant iuxta forma[m] finis p[re]d[i]c[t]i si it[a] eo q[uo]d p[re]d[i]c[t]i Will[ielmu]s fil[ius] Rog[er]i & margareta obierunt
    sine her[ede] de corp[or]ib[us] suis exeunte Et ei concedunt it[a] postea sc[i]l[ice]t a die paschis in xv dies     tuncp[ro]x[ime] sequ[entem] ven[it] quidam Rog[er]us de Bradburne et dic[it] q[uo]d ip[s]i est consanguinens & her[es] p[re]d[i]c[t]i Will[ielm]i fil[ii] Rog[er]i videl[ice]t fil[ius] Will[ielm]i fr[atr]is Rog[er]i fr[atr]is
    p[re]d[i]c[t]i Will[ielm]i fil[ii] Rog[er]i qui fuit pars finis p[re]d[i]c[t]i eo q[uo]d p[re]d[i]c[t]us Joh[ann]es de Bradburne obiit sine her[ede] de corp[or]e suo
    exeunte et pet[it] br[ev]e ad p[re]muniend[um] p[re]d[i]c[t]es Nich[olau]m & Joh[ann]em Whythed essend[a] hic osten[dendum] si quid it[a] quare p[re]d[i]c[t]e
    quinq[ue] bouate t[er]re quas ip[s]i tenent in forma p[re]d[i]c[t]a post morte[s] p[re]d[i]c[t]or[um] Will[ielm]i de Bradburne senioris Will[ielm]i fil[ii] Rog[er]i
    & margar[ete] prefato Rog[er]o consang[uinens] & her[ede] p[re]d[i]c[t]i Will[ielm]i fil[ii] Rog[er]i remanere non debeant iuxta forma[m] finis p[re]d[i]c[t]i si it[a]
    eo q[uo]d it[a] et ei concedit reto[r]nabile hic in Crastino s[an]c[t]i Joh[ann]is Bapt[ist]e it[a] ad qu[ar]e ost[endend]um vic[um] non inc[urrit] br[ev]e Et sup[er]
    hac ven[it] p[re]d[i]c[t]us Rog[er]us & dic[it] q[uo]d p[re]d[i]c[t]us Nich[ola]us mortuus est & q[uo]d p[re]d[i]c[t]us Joh[ann]es Whythed est integre tenens
    de p[re]d[i]c[t]is quinq[ue] bouat[a] t[er]re in p[re]d[i]c[t]a villa de Perwyche & eas tenet cont[ra] forma[m] finis p[re]d[i]c[t]i et pet[it] br[ev]e p[re]d[i]c[t]o vic[o] Derb[iensis]
    ad p[re]muniend[um] p[re]d[i]c[tu]m Joh[ann]em Whythed essend[a] hic osten[dendum] in forma p[re]d[i]c[t]a si it[a] eo q[uo]d it[a] Et ei concedit reto[r]nabil[e] hic
    a die s[an]c[t]i Nich[ola]is in xv dies it[a] Et sup[er] hoc concessu[m] est p[er] Iustic[ariis] q[uo]d Joh[ann]es de Aston sequat[ur] p[ro] p[re]d[i]c[t]o Rog[er]o qui infra
    etate est v[er]sus p[re]d[i]c[tu]m Joh[ann]em de p[re]d[i]c[t]o pl[ac]ito

    This translates as:
    The Lord King has committed (to) his Justices this his close writ, in these words: Edward, (by) god's grace King of England, Lord of Ireland & the Aquitaine, (to) his Justices of the Bench, greetings; we send (to) you, under the foot of our seal, a transcript of the foot of that fine levied in the court of us, before John de Stonore & his colleagues, our Justices of the Bench, (in) the year of our reign the twentieth [1346], by means of our writ, Between William, son of Roger de Bradburne, the younger & Margaret his wife, querents, & John Domville & Matilda his wife, deforciants, concerning one messuage, one carucate, five bovates, & thirty acres of land, ten marks rent, & the moiety of one mill, with appurtenances, in Bradburne, Asshburne, Wircusworthe, Perwyche, Benteleye, & Kneveton, that before us in our chancery, the writ for certain causes we have caused to come, commanding that (by) inspection of the inscribed fine aforesaid, further to the prosecution of John de Bradburne, uncle & heir of the aforesaid William, we caused (it) to be done, that by law & according to the statutes & customs of our reign, will be done; Witness myself at Westminster, (on the) 10(th) day of November (in) the year of our reign the fortieth (&) second [1368], the Transcript aforesaid following in these words: this is the final agreement made in the court of the lord King at Westminster, from the day of Easter Sunday, within three weeks, (in) the year of the reign of Edward, King of England the third after the conquest, the twentieth, and (of) the reign of the same, King of France, the seventh [1346], before John de Stonore, William de Sharshull, Roger Hillary, Richard de Kelleshull, Richard de Wylughby, & John de Stonford, Justices, & other of the lord King's faithful (subjects) then there present, Between William, son of Roger de Bradeburne, the younger, & Margaret, the wife of him, querents, & John Domville & Matilda his wife, deforciants, concerning one messuage, one carucate, five bovates, & thirty acres of land, ten marks rent, & the moiety of one mill, with appurtenances, in Bradeburne, Asshburne, Wircusworthe, Perwyche, Benteleye, & Kneveton, concerning which a plea of covenant had been summoned between them in the same court, namely that the aforesaid John & Matilda have granted (to) the aforesaid William & Margaret the aforesaid messuage, carucate of land, & rent, with appurtenances, And those (to) them (they) have surrendered in the same court, to have & to hold (to) the same William & Margaret, & (to) the heirs from the bodies of the same William & Margaret issuing, (to be holden) of the chief lords of that fee, through the services which to that holding belong, in perpetuity. And moreover, the same John & Matilda have granted for themselves, & (for) the heirs of the same Matilda, that five bovates & thirty-&-five acres of land, with appurtenances, in the aforesaid towns of Kneveton & Perwyche, which William de Bradburne the elder has held for the term of (his) life, And furthermore, that the moiety of the aforesaid mill, with appurtenances, in the aforesaid town of Wircusworth, which Richard de Bradburne & John de Bradburne have held for the term of (their) life, according to the heirship of the aforesaid Matilda, (from) the day that this agreement was made, And which after the demise of the said William de Bradburne the elder, (and of) Richard & John de Bradburne, to the aforesaid John Domville & Matilda, & (to) the heirs of the same Matilda, (they) have owed the reversion; after the demise of the same William de Bradburne the elder, (& of) Richard & John de Bradburne, (the properties) wholly passed (to) the aforesaid William, son of Roger, & (to) Margaret, & (to) their heirs aforesaid, To hold likewise with the aforesaid messuage, carucate of land, & rent, which (to) them by means of this fine pass, (to be holden) of the chief lords of that fee, through the services which to that holding belong, in perpetuity. And if it come to pass that the same William, son of Roger, & Margaret should die without an heir from their bodies issuing, then after the demise of the same William & Margaret, the aforesaid holding, with appurtenances, wholly will pass (to) the right heirs of the aforesaid William, son of Roger, To hold of the chief lords of that fee, through the services which to that holding belong, in perpetuity. And for this grant, surrender, fine, & agreement, the same William, son of Roger, & Margaret have given (to) the aforesaid John Domville & Matilda forty marks of silver. And moreover, in this place comes a certain John de Aston, from the party of the aforesaid John de Bradburne, & states that the aforesaid William de Bradburne the elder has died, and that the aforesaid William, son of Roger, & Margaret have died without an heir from their bodies issuing, & that the aforesaid John Domville & Matilda his wife, the aforesaid messuage, carucate, & thirty acres of land, & rent, with appurtenances, in the aforesaid towns of Bradburne, Asshburne, Benteleye, & Kneveton, which are parcels of the holdings aforesaid, within the said fine paid, are entered into themselves, that a certain Nicholas Fitz Huerd & John Whythed, parson of the moiety of the Church of Mogynton, the aforesaid five bovates of land, with appurtenances, in the aforesaid town of Perwyche, are entered into, & hold them against the terms of the fine aforesaid. And (he) petitions thereupon one writ (for) the place of Derby, to summon the aforesaid John Domville & Matilda, and another writ likewise (for) the same place, to summon the aforesaid Nicholas & John Whythed, being in this place from the day of Saint Hillary, within 15 days, to be shown if any thus, namely the aforesaid John Domville & Matilda, wherefore the aforesaid holdings, with appurtenances, which the same hold according to the terms aforesaid, And the aforesaid Nicholas & John Whythed to be shown wherefore the aforesaid five bovates of land which the same holds according to the terms aforesaid after the deaths of the aforesaid William de Bradburne the elder, (of) William, son of Roger, & (of) Margaret, (of) the afore-mentioned John de Bradburne, uncle & heir of the aforesaid William, son of Roger, should not pass according to the terms of the fine aforesaid, if thus, because the aforesaid William, son of Roger, & Margaret have died without an heir from their bodies issuing. And (they) are granted (to) him thus afterwards, namely from the day of Easter Sunday, within 15 days; then next following, comes a certain Roger de Bradburne and states that the same is a blood-relative & heir of the aforesaid William, son of Roger, namely the son of William, brother of Roger, brother of the aforesaid William, son of Roger, who was part of the fine aforesaid, because the aforesaid John de Bradburne has died without an heir from his body issuing, and (he) petitions a writ to summon the aforesaid Nicholas & John Whythed, being in this place to be shown if any thus, wherefore the aforesaid five bovates of land which the same hold according to the terms aforesaid after the deaths of the aforesaid William de Bradburne senior, (of) William, son of Roger, & (of) Margaret, (to) the afore-mentioned Roger, blood-relative & heir of the aforesaid William, son of Roger, should not pass according to the terms of the fine aforesaid, if thus, because thus, and (it) is granted (to) him, returnable here on the Morrow of Saint John the Baptist, thus to be shown wherefore (in) the place (he) should not incur the writ. And moreover, here comes the aforesaid Roger, & states that the aforesaid Nicholas is dead, & that the aforesaid John Whythed is wholly the tenant of the aforesaid five bovates of land in the aforesaid town of Perwyche, & holds them against the terms of the fine aforesaid, and (he) petitions a writ (for) the aforesaid place of Derby, to summon the aforesaid John Whythed, being here to be shown in accordance with the terms aforesaid, if thus, because thus. And (it) is granted (to) him, returnable here from the day of Saint Nicholas, within 15 days thus. And during this (time), (it) has been granted by the Justices that John of Aston pursue (proceedings) on behalf of the aforesaid Roger, who under age is, against the aforesaid John, according to the aforesaid plea.
  37. "Patent Rolls of the Reign of Edward II, Vol 2, 1313-1317". Entry on p21-25 reads:
    [1313] Oct 16. Pardon to Thomas, earl of Lancaster, and his adherents, followers, and Westminster, confederates, of all causes of anger, indignation, suits, accusations, &c, arisen in any manner on account of Peter de Gavaston, from the time of the king's marriage with his dear companion Isabella, whether on account of the capture, detention, or death of Peter de Gavaston, or on account of any forcible entries into any towns or castles, or any sieges of the same; or on account of having borne arms, or of having taken any prisoners, or of having entered into any confederacies whatever, or in any other manner touching or concerning Peter de Gavaston, or that which befel him. French. [Fadera: Parl Writs]
    The like, word for word, to the under-mentioned persons, adherents of Thomas, earl of Lancaster, for the death of Peter de Gavaston, viz -
    ...
    Henry de Bradeborne
    ...
  38. "Okeover of Okeover" archive at Derbyshire Record Office. Item ref D231M/T301. Catalogue entry reads:
    1319
    Gift by John son of Roger de Bradeburn [Bradbourne], knight, to Margery daughter of Matthew de Knyveton [Kniveton] of Bradeley of one messuage with buildings and superstructures and a courtyard with all appurtenances in Assheburn [Ashbourne], lying between the holding of Letitia de Clifton and the highway, and which extends in length from the holding of Lord Nicholas de Marchinton towards the highway: the courtyard lies between the holding of Lord Nicholas de Marchinton and the land which Roger [Wheeler], once held, and extends to length from the holding of Lord Nicholas de Marchinton up to the holding of Richard de Calewich
    Witnesses: William Cokayn de Assheburn, Thomas son of Adam of the same place, William de Kniveton, Roger de Marchinton, Robert de Cluware, Henry de Clifton, Richard, clerk, and others
    Wednesday the Feast of St Peter ad vincula
    (1 Aug) 1319

    A shorter precis appears in "Descriptive catalogue of Derbyshire charters", Jeayes. as entry 59, which only differs in that Roger is also described as lord of the manor ("John fil Dom Rogeri de Bradeburn, mil"")
  39. "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", Old Series, Volume X, Part 1. "Extracts from the Plea Rolls". Entry on p68 reads:
    And the same jurors [of Tamworth] said that about the Feast of Trinity, 17 E. II., a dispute arose between Thomas de Brumpton on one part and William de Ipstanes on the other concerning the Church of Chirche-Eyton, to which church the said Thomas had been instituted, and he held it until the said William de Ipstanes and John de Ipstanes his brother, Henry de Cressewalle, Philip de Ipstanes, Philip son of Vivian de Chetewynde, William de Chetelton, John de Picheford, Thomas de Budeyerd, Thomas of the Greneway, Stephen de Beghterton, John de Coueleye, Eoger Priour of Couleye and seven others named, had on the day and year above named ejected him by force, and they had all with the exception of William de Ipstanes, Henry de Cressewalle, William de Chetelton,(and Thomas of the Greneway, besieged the manor house of Mary de Brumpton at Eyton with swords, bows and arrows, against the King's peace, and to the great terror of the people. And that the said William de Ipstanes and his companions had maintained themselves in the said church until about the Nativity of St. John, the Baptist, 17 E. II., when the said Thomas de Brumpton, John son of William de Stafford, junior, Walter and William brothers of the said John, Roger son of Roger de Trumwyne, Roger de Chetewynd, John de Boulewas, Henry de Sogenhull, William Trumwyne of Cankbury, Thomas de Aston, near Stone, and Robert his son, John le Hore of Frodewall, Richard de Aston, near Stone, Robert de Beaumeis, Robert de Greseleie and Roger his brother, John son of John de Perton, and 21 others named, with the maintenance, council, and help of Sir William de Stafford, Knight, and of Roger Trumwyne, Knight, had come armed with men, both foot and horse, and had ejected the said William de Ipstanes from the said church against the King's peace, etc.
    And that on the Thursday before the Feast of St. Cedde, 19 E. II., after the return of the said John de Ipstanes from Gascony on the day that the County Court was held at Stafford and in full County, the said John de Ipstanes, Knight, came with Thomas Wither, Knight, Nicholas de Longeford, Knight, Edmund de Appelby, Knight, Philip de Barynton, Knight, Thomas de Barynton, Knight, Hugh son of Hugh de Meynil, Knight (miles), William de Chetelton, Henry de Cressewalle and Thomas his brother, John de Bradburn, Richard and William his brothers, Ralph de Stafford, Richard de Hastang, and Humphrey his brother, Geoffrey Biroun, Thomas of the Greneway, Philip son of Vivian de Chetewynde, Philip of the Lee, and Richard his brother, Richard Shirard, and William his son, William de Chetelton of Draycote, Thomas de Rudeyerd and John his brother, William Wyther, and Theobald de Barynton,armed to the great terror of the people, and they had in the same way congregated together in many other places, against the King's peace, etc. And at the next County Court of Staffordshire held at Stafford about the Feast of Pentecost, 18 E. II., there came John Priour of Stafford, Chaplain, Philip de Lutteley, Ralph de Stafford, and Richard his brother, William de Chetelton, Henry de Cressewalle, John Domville, Richard de Hastang and Umfrey his brother, William Blaunchard, John son of Thomas de Stafford, William de Chetelton of Draicote, and Philip his brother, Roger de Pipe of Lichefeld, and five others named, armed against the King's peace, with horse and foot, and in the same way at many other places in the said County at the maintenance of Thomas de Pipe, to the great terror of the people, etc. The Sheriff was therefore commanded to summon them to be before the said Justices at Lichefeld on the Friday after the Feast of St. Gregory, etc.
    And Thomas le Rous, Robert Mauveysyn, Hugh de Aston, William de Derlaston, Philip de Aust, Richard de Calengwode, Robert de Gresbrok, William de Stretton, Henry de Morf, Ralph de Eynefeld (Enville), William de le Horewode, and John de Mollesleye of the Hundreds of Offelowe and Seysdon, jurors, said upon oath that Henry le Parker of Bretteby had feloniously killed at Burton-upon-Trent, John Jons of Cateby, junior, on the Thursday, the Feast of the Ascension, 16 E. II. The Sheriff was therefore ordered to arrest him, etc. (as before), m. 1, dorso.
  40. "Collections for a History of Staffordshire", Old Series, Volume X, Part 1. "Extracts from the Plea Rolls". Entry on p42 reads:
    CORAM REGE ROLL, EASTER, 15 E II.
    Staff. An exemplication of the process against Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, which had been carried on before the King at Pontefract, was ordered to be publicly read and recorded, by writ dated from York, 6th May, 15 E. II. The process at Pontefract was taken on the Monday before the Annunciation of the Blessed Mary, 15 E. II., and details the proceedings at full length of the confederation and their correspondence with Robert Bruce, and judgment on the Earl of Lancaster that he should be beheaded, and that Warine de l'Isle, William Tuchet, Thomas Mauduit, Henry de Bradburn,[2] William fitzWilliam, and William Cheyney should be hanged.
    [2] Probably a Derbyshire tenant of the Earl: for on the same Roll, Matilda, formerly wife of Bartholomew de Sudle (one of the King's Barons), sued in person John de Bradbum, Henry de Bradburn, and William his brother, for robbery and breach of the King's peace, and by another writ she sued John de Bradburn for a rape committed on her in Derbyshire.
  41. "Croniques de London depuis L'an 44 Hen III Jusqu'a l'an 17 Edw III". Aungier, 1844 is a transcription of a contemporary French chronicle. Page 44/5 reads:
    En cele an, a le conversion de seint Poul, les ij. Mortimers se rendirent a le grace le roy, et furent amenez a le tour de Loundres par le counte de Garenne, Robert Lewer, et plusours autres, le samadi apres manger le veille de seint Valentyn. En cele temps fut le viscounte de Hereford traine et pendu a Gloucestre. En cele temps, le iij jour de Marz, les gentz de Loundres maunderent au roy autre foithe vj. xx hommes armez. En cele temps le mardy prochein apres le feste seint Gregorie, qe fut le xvj. jour de Marz, fut sire Thomas de Lancastre counte de v. counts prys a Burghbrigge par un sire Andreu de Hercle, et sire Humfrey de Boun counte de Hereford, tue, et moutz des bone gentz barounes de la tere tuez, pris, et enprisounez; et le xxj. jour de Marz fu le dit counte de Lancastre decole a Pountfreit. Et rnesme le jour William le fitz William, sire Waryn del Isle, sire Henry de Bradebourne, sire Thomas Mauduyt, sire William Tuchet, sire William Cheyne, barounes, et Thomas Page, vadlet au dit counte de Lancastre, furent touz treynez et penduz a Loundres, le tierze jour d'Averil, qe fut en la veille des Paumes. Et sire Johan Moubray, sire Roger de Clifford, sire Gosselyn d'Eyville, estoyent treynez et penduz aEverwik; et sire Henry Tyeis treine et pendu a Loundres.
    An Eglish translation is given in "The French Chronicle of London: Chronicles of the Mayors and Sheriffs of London: 1188-1274", which reads:
    15 Edward II. [A.D. 1321, 2]
    In this year, at the Conversion of Saint Paul [25 January] the two Mortimers threw themselves upon the King's favour, and were taken to the Tower of London by the Earl of Warenne, Robert Lewer, and many others, after dinner on Saturday, the Vigil of Saint Valentine [14 February]. At this time, the Sheriff of Hereford was drawn and hanged at Gloucester. At this time, on the third day of March, the people of London sent to the King, a second time, 120 men-at-arms. At this time, on the Tuesday after the Feast of Saint Gregory [12 March], being the 16th day of March, Sir Thomas de Lancaster, Earl of five Counties, was taken at Burghbrigge by one Sir Andrew de Hercle; and Sir Humphrey de Boun, Earl of Hereford, was slain, and many good folks, Barons of the land, slain, or taken and imprisoned; and on the 21st day of March the said Earl of Lancaster was beheaded at Pountfreit. On the same day also, William Fitz-William, Sir Waryn del Isle, Sir Henry de Bradebourne, Sir Thomas Mauduyt, Sir William Tuchet, Sir William Cheyne, Barons, and Thomas Page, esquire to the said Earl of Lancaster, were all drawn and hanged at London, it being the Vigil of Palm Sunday. Also, Sir John Moubray, Sir Roger de Clifford, and Sir Gosselyn d'Ey ville, were drawn and hanged at Euerwik; and Sir Henry Tyeis was drawn and hanged at London.
  42. The National Archives. Ancient petitions. Ref SC 8/204/10199. Catalogue entry reads:
    Places mentioned: Callow, [Derbyshire]; Idridgehay, Derbyshire; Leicester honour; Wirksworth wapentake, [Derbyshire]; Caverswall, [Staffordshire]; Haywra (Haverah Park), [West Riding of Yorkshire].
    Other people mentioned: Richard de Wylughby (Willoughby); Henry de Hambury (Hanbury); John de la Launde, first husband of Joan, widow of Richard le Foun; Henry de Bradeburn (Bradbourne); Joan [le Foun], widow of Richard le Foun; Roger Beler; Thomas [of Lancaster], earl of Lancaster; Richard le Foun, late husband of Joan le Foun, and steward of the honour of Leicester.
    Nature of request: Writ of Edward II to Willoughby and Hanbury assigning them to hold an inquisition by jury into the complaint of Joan le Foun made by petition concerning the manor of Callow and the mill of Idridgehay which she held by enfeoffment of her first husband through Henry de Bradbourne, and which has been taken into the king's hand because her second husband was the earl of Lancaster's steward of the honour of Leicester, he dieing following his arrest.
    Endorsement: [None].
    Covering dates 1322
    Note: The writ is dated in its dating clause to 28 May 1322 (15 Edw. II).
  43. The National Archives. Ancient petitions. Ref SC 8/204/10198. Catalogue entry reads:
    Places mentioned: Derby, [Derbyshire]; Callow, [Derbyshire]; Idridgehay, Derbyshire; Leicester honour; Wirksworth wapentake, [Derbyshire]; Caverswall, [Staffordshire].
    Other people mentioned: Richard de Wylughby (Willoughby); Henry de Hambury (Hanbury); Robert Tok (Took), keeper of the lands and tenements late of Richard le Foun in Derbyshire; Ralph de Bakepuitz; Robert de Grendon; Roger de Rossinton; Robert de Ashborn (Ashbourne); Henry de Alsop; Roger de la Hay; William de Luchirche (Litchurch); Thomas [de Benteley], son of Richard de Bentley; John de Burgilon; Henry de Kent; John Troccok; Adam de la Corner; John de la Launde, first husband of Joan, widow of Richard le Foun; Henry de Bradeborn (Bradbourne); Joan [le Founz (Foun)], widow of Richard le Foun; Roger Beler; Thomas [of Lancaster], Earl of Lancaster; Richard le Founz (Foun), late husband of Joan le Foun, and steward of the honour of Leicester.
    Nature of request: Inquisition taken at Derby before Willoughby and Hanbury by a jury who say that her first husband enfeoffed Bradbourne with the manor of Callow and Idridgehay mill and he granted it to her when she was Launde's wife. She continued to be seised by this feoffment for 20 years or more until after the death of her second husband when Beler took the manor and mill into the king's hand because her second husband had been the steward of the earl of Lancaster in his honour of Leicester for which reason he had been taken at Bradbourne to Caverswall Castle where he died.
    Endorsement: [None].
    Covering dates 1322
    Note: The inquisition is dated in its dating clause to 6 August 1322 (16 Edw II).
  44. "Close Rolls of the Reign of Edward II, 1318-1323". Entry on p589/90 reads:
    [1322] Aug 8. To Robert Tok and William de Bircheovre, keeper of certain goods that belonged to Richard le Foun in the king's hands. As the king learns by inquisition taken by Richard de Wylughby and Henry de Hambury that Fulk de Penebrugge, John de Chetewynde, Walter de Hugeford, and others unknown, on Sunday after St. Gregory last, took Richard le Foun at Bradeburne, co. Derby, and carried him thence to the castle of Careswell, co. Stafford, and there detained him until Friday the feast of St. George following, when he died a natural death, and that he was not convicted of any trespass, felony, or rebellion, and was not an adherent of Thomas, late earl of Lancaster, except that he was his steward of Leicester, and that in his lifetime he made his will, whereof he appointed Joan his wife and Richard her brother his executors, and that Roger Reler, on Wednesday before Palm Sunday last, took certain of the said Richard's goods into the king's hands, to wit two plough-oxen, price 13s. 4d; a plough-beast (jumentum), price 20s; three foals, price 10s each; 10 oxen, price 13s 4d each; 3 cows, price 13s 4d each; two young heifers, price 6s 8d each; a calf, price 2s; 200 wool-bearing sheep, price 2s 6d each; 30 lambs, price 16d each; 6 quarters of wheat, price 13s 4d a quarter; 45 quarters of oats, price 4s a quarter; the king orders the said Robert and William to deliver the aforesaid goods to the executors for the execution of the said Richard's will.
                                                              By pet. of C. [1 1674-6.]
    To Thomas de Dunstaple, keeper of certain goods that belonged to Richard le Feoun in the king's hands. Like recital and order concerning a woman's saddle, price 10 marks; six robes for the said Richard, price £6; two robes for the aforesaid Joan, price £6; six beds, price £12; four beds, price £4; twelve cloths (mappas) and towels (manutergiis), price 100s; a forcer, with divers jewels, to the value of £lO, which belonged to the said Richard, and which he took into the king's hands on Saturday the morrow of St. Gregory last.
                                                              By pet. of C.
    To Robert Tok, keeper of the lands of the aforesaid Richard. Order to deliver to Joan, late the wife of the said Richard, the manor of Caldelowe and the mill of Edrichelay, co. Derby, as the king learns by inquisition taken by Richard de Wylughby and Henry de Hambury that John de la Launde, Joan's first husband, enfeoifed Henry de Bradebourn of the said manor and mill, and that Henry, having had seisin thereof, granted them to Joan for life, with reversion to John son of the said John de la Launde and Joan, and that Joan continued her seisin thereof for twenty years and more, until Roger Beler took the manor and mill into the king's hands because the aforesaid Richard was the steward of Thomas, late earl of Lancaster.
                                                              By pet. of C.
    To the same. As the king lenrns by the aforesaid inquisition that the said Richard was seised in his demesne as of fee at his death of a messuage and a carucate of land in Yeveley, co. Derby, and held them of Hugh son of Hugh de Menill by tbe service of 12d yearly for all service, that Richard, son of the said Richard, is his next heir and is aged six years, and that the custody of the lands pertains to Joan, late the wife of Richard, the elder, mother of Richard, the younger, by reason of the socage aforesaid, and that Richard, the elder, died at Careswell, as above, and that the lands were taken into the king's hands by Roger Beler, the king orders the keeper to deliver the lands and the issues thereof to the aforesaid Joan as nearest [friend] of the heir.
                                                              By pet. of C.
  45. The National Archives. Ancient petitions. Ref SC 8/204/10197. Catalogue entry reads:
    Petitioners: Joan [le Foun], widow of Richard le Foun.
    Addressees: King and council.
    Places mentioned: Callow, Derbyshire; Idridgehay, Derbyshire; Bradbourne, [Derbyshire]; Caverswall, [Staffordshire]; Leicester honour.
    Other people mentioned: Richard le Foun, late second husband of the petitioner; John de la Launde, late first husband of the petitioner; John [de la Launde], son of John de la Launde; Henry de Bradebourne (Bradbourne); [Thomas of Lancaster], Earl of Lancaster; Roger Beler.
    Nature of request: Foun requests remedy as her first husband enfeoffed Bradbourne with the manor of Callow and Idridgehay mill and he granted it to her when she was Launde's wife. She continued to be seised by this feoffment for twenty years or more until after the death of her second husband when Beler took the manor and mill into the king's hand because her second husband had been the steward of the earl of Lancaster in his honour of Leicester for which reason he had been taken at Bradbourne to Caverswall Castle where he died.
    1) Endorsement: Let good people be assigned to enquire of the truth in the presence of Roger Beler, and let the inquisition be returned into Chancery, and let justice be done.
    2) Coram rege, Fulbourn.
    Covering dates [1322]
    Note The petition dates to 1322 as the associated documents all date to May and August 1322, so that the petition must predate these, but postdate the fall of the earl of Lancaster (SC 8/203/10198-9) and the keeper of Richard le Foun's lands was ordered to restore them to the petitioner on 8 August 1322 (CCR 1318-23, p.589).
  46. "Close Rolls of the Reign of Edward II, 1318-1323". Entry on p625 reads:
    [1323] Jan 25. To Robert Tok, keeper of certain of the rebels' lands in co. Derby. As the king learns by inquisition taken by Roger Beler, John Cheynel, and Walter Waldeshef that Henry de Bradebourn, son and heir of Roger de Bradebourn, dowered his mother Philippa with all the lands in co. Derby whereof his father was seised when he married her, to wit the manor of Bradebourn, except two parts of the services of the tenants of the manor, in allowance of her dower of that manor, and of two carucates of land 'en Les Borwes', and of a carucate of land in the manor of Le Howe, and of a third of the same manor, and of a third of the remainder of all his inheritance in the said county, at St. Hilary, in the 13th year of the king's reign, and that he afterwards enfeoffed her of the whole residue of his inheritance, to have with her dower to her and her heirs, and that he delivered in person to her at Bradebourn seisin of that manor on Friday after the Translation of St. Thomas, in the 15th year of the king's reign, and appointed Master John de Bradeburn his attorney to deliver to her in his name seisin of all the residue of his lands, and that Master John delivered seisin to her on Monday after the aforesaid feast, and that Philippa continued her seisin of all the manors and lands aforesaid from the said Friday and Monday until Saturday before the Annunciation next following, when the manors and lands were taken into the king's hands upon the forfeiture of the said Henry as if he had been then seised thereof, and it appears by another inquisition taken by the aforesaid keeper and Richard de Wylughby that the manors and lands aforesaid are not held of the king, the king therefore orders the keeper not to intermeddle further with the manors and lands, and to restore the issues thereof.
  47. "Calendar of Fine Rolls Preserved at the Public record Office, Vol 3, 1319-1327". Entry on p332/3 reads:
    [1325] Feb 23. Order to John de Bolingbrok, escheator in the counties of Warwick, Leicester, Nottingham, Derby and Lancaster, to take into the king's hand and to keep safely until further order the manors and lands below specified delivered to Philippa, mother of Henry de Bradbourn, saving to Philippa her right therein; it having been found by an inquisition made by Roger Beler, John Cheynel and Walter Waldeshef, that the said Henry, son and heir of Roger de Bradeburn, dowered his said mother with all the lands in the county of Derby whereof his said father was seised on the day when he espoused her, to wit, the manor of Bradeburn, except two parts of the services of the tenants thereof in allowance of her dower thereof, and 2 carucates of land in ' les Borwes,' and a carucate of land within the manor 'del Howe', and a third part of that manor, and a third part of the residue of his whole inheritance within the said county, at Hilary, 13 Edward II, and that afterwards the same Henry enfeoffed her by charter of the whole residue of his inheritance, to hold with the said dower to her and her heirs, and in his own person delivered to her at Bradeburn seisin of that manor on Friday after the Translation of St. Thomas the Martyr, 15 Edward II, and by his letters patent appointed Master John de Bradeburn his attorney to deliver seisin of the residue of the said lands, which Master John delivered such seisin on Monday after the said Translation, and that Philippa was so seised of the said manors and lands and continued seisin thereof from the said Friday and Monday until the Saturday before the Annunciation following, on which day the said manors and lands were taken into the king's hand by the forfeiture of the said Henry, as if he had been seised thereof; by virtue of which inquisition the king ordered Robert Tok, then keeper of forfeited lands in the county of Derby, not to meddle with the said manors and lands, if they had been taken into the king's hand on that account and no other, and to deliver any issues thereof received by him to those whose they were; but because in the commission made to the said Roger, John and Walter, it was contained that the inquisition to be made by them should be taken in the presence of the keeper of forfeited lands in the said county, and in the said inquisition taken by them and returned to Chancery there is no mention that the keeper was summoned or was present at the taking thereof, by virtue of which inquisition the said manors and lands were afterwards delivered to Philippa by the king's writ, process was had thereon before the king in his court, wherein it was decided that the said manors and lands so delivered to her should be resumed into the king's hand.
  48. The National Archives. Ancient petitions. Ref SC 8/200/9988. Catalogue entry reads:
    Petitioners: Philippa [de Brodborne (Bradbourne)], widow of Roger de Brodborne (Bradborne).
    Addressees: King and council.
    Other people mentioned: Roger de Brodborne (Bradbourne); Henry de Bradborne (Bradbourne), son and heir of Roger de Bradborne (Bradbourne); Roger Beler; Robert Tok; Robert de Ayleston; William de Herle; John de Denum.
    Nature of request: [This petition is damaged.]
    Philippa, widow of Roger de Brodborne, states that Henry, Roger's son and heir, enfeoffed her with all his inheritance, both her dower which had previously been assigned and the rest, to hold from him and his heirs forever, and that she was seised of these lands and tenements until the escheator, after Henry's death, seized them into the King's hand because of his forfeiture. She petitioned parliament for a remedy, and the King and council ordered an inquisition. This found in her favour and the King removed his hand, but because the inquisition did not specifically mention that the keeper of the lands was present, they have been taken back into the King's hand, and she is again expelled. She requests a remedy.
    Endorsement: Because the council is agreed that the matter of the contents etc. was previously discussed before the King, therefore before the King.A commission was previously issued to Robert de Ayleston, William de Herle and John de Denum, so that Robert would be one, to inquire into the contents of the petition, in the presence of the keeper, and to return the inquisition: therefore she is to sue for that commission if she wishes.
    Covering dates [c. 1325]
    Note: CFR 1319-27 pp.332-333 is dated 23 February 1325, and the petition would seem to date from shortly thereafter.The commission for the first inquisition (CIM 1307-49 no. 576) is dated 1 September 16 Edward II (1322), and CCR 1318-23 p.625 is dated 25 January 1323. The commission for CIM 1307-49 no.597 is dated 1 January 16 Edward II (1323).
  49. "Close Rolls of the Reign of Edward III, 1327-1330". Entry on p54 reads:
    [1327] Feb 18. To John de Denum, keeper of the lands that belonged to Philippa, late the wife of Roger de Bradeburn, in co. Derby, or to him who supplies his place. The aforesaid Philippa has shewn the king, by her petition before him and his council, that she, long before Thomas, late earl of Lancaster, prosecuted his quarrel against Hugh le Despenser, the elder, and others, acquired to her and her heirs in fee from Henry de Bradeburn, deceased, the manors of Bradeburn and Hogh, in the said county, and was seised thereof in her demesne as of fee until the late king's escheator in those parts unjustly amoved her from the manors and took them into the late king's hands, because the said Henry adhered to the earl in the aforesaid quarrel, pretending that the manors were Henry's and not hers, whereupon she afterwards prayed the late king to provide a remedy; and although it was found by an inquisition taken before Roger de Beler and his fellows by the late king's order that the manors were the right of Philippa by reason of the acquisition aforesaid, and they were delivered to her as her right by virtue of a writ of the late king's directed to the aforesaid keeper, and she was long seised of them by the aforesaid delivery, the late king caused them to be taken into his hands again because the inquisition did not say that it was taken in the presence of the keeper of the manors, and the manors are thus in the king's hands, wherefore she has prayed the king to provide a remedy: as it appears by the rolls of chancery that the manors were at first taken into the late king's hands by reason of the quarrel aforesaid, which has been adjudged good and just by the king and the whole parliament, and the judgments rendered against those who were of the quarrel have been wholly annulled, the king orders the keeper to deliver the manors to Philippa, together with the issues and arrears of ferms for which answer has not been made to the late king.
  50. The National Archives. Ancient petitions. Ref SC 8/158/7879. Catalogue entry reads:
    Petitioners: Philippa [de Bradebourne (Bradbourne)], widow of Roger de Bradbourne.
    Addressees: King and council.
    Places mentioned: Bradbourne, [Derbyshire]; Hegh (Heage), [Derbyshire]; Derbyshire.
    Other people mentioned: Roger de Bradebourne (Bradbourne), late husband of the petitioner; Henry de Bradebourne (Bradbourne); Roger de Belers, justice; Robert de Baldok; Hugh le Despenser.
    Nature of request: Bradebourne requests remedy as she was disseised of the manors of Bradbourne and Heage by the escheator who alleged that they were Henry de Bradbourne's, an adherent of the earl of Lancaster, and she recovered these following a petition to parliament, but was again disseised by Despenser.
    Endorsement: Let this petition be sent to Chancery, and the chancellor should advise himself of the cause of the taking of the manors into the king's hand, and if it was taken because of the quarrel with the earl of Lancaster let the manor be restored with the issues and arrears.
    Covering dates [1327]
    Note: The petition dates to 1327 as John de Denum, keeper of the lands belonging to the petitioner was ordered to restore them on 18 February 1327 (CCR 1327-30, p.54).
  51. The National Archives. Chancery and Exchequer: King's Remembrancer: Parliamentary and Council Proceedings. Ref C 49/6/4. Catalogue entry reads:
    Petition of Roger brother of Henry de Bradebourne for the restitution of his lands
    Covering dates 1 Edw III
    Note : printed in Rotuli Parliamentorum II p 434

    The cited entry from Rotuli Parliamentorum reads:
    To the Petition of Roger de Bradeburn, brother and heire of Henry de Bradeburn, beseeching, .That all the Lands and Tenements which were of the inheritance of the foresaid Henry were taken into the King's hands, because the said Henry did adhere to Thomas late Earle of Lanc' &c.
    It is answered thus, Let the Petition be dd into the Chancery, and let the Chancery bee advised of the cause of the taking of the Lands &c. Let them be restored &c. Rot. 3º.
  52. "Calendar of Fine Rolls Preserved at the Public record Office, Vol 4, 1327-1337". Entry on p60 reads:
    [1327] Feb 10 Order to Thomas de Harpeden, escheator in the said counties, to take into the king's hand the lands late of Laurence Tremuer, deceased, tenant in chief of Edward II.
    The like to the escheator beyond Trent touching the lands late of Henry de Bradburne.



Notes:


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